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Security Experts Warn of Two Primary Client-Side Risks Associated with Data Exfiltration and Loss

Security Experts Warn of Two Primary Client-Side Risks Associated with Data Exfiltration and Loss

Jul 19, 2022
Two client-side risks dominate the problems with data loss and data exfiltration: improperly placed trackers on websites and web applications and malicious client-side code pulled from third-party repositories like NPM.  Client-side security researchers are finding that improperly placed trackers, while not intentionally malicious, are a growing problem and have clear and significant privacy implications when it comes to both compliance/regulatory concerns, like HIPAA or PCI DSS 4.0. To highlight the risks with misplaced trackers, a  recent study  by The Markup (a non-profit news organization) examined Newsweek's top 100 hospitals in America. They found a Facebook tracker on one-third of the hospital websites which sent Facebook highly personal healthcare data whenever the user clicked the "schedule appointment" button. The data was not necessarily anonymized, because the data was connected to an IP address, and both the IP address and the appointment information get delivered to Fac
Avoiding Death by a Thousand Scripts: Using Automated Content Security Policies

Avoiding Death by a Thousand Scripts: Using Automated Content Security Policies

Jul 12, 2022
Businesses know they need to secure their client-side scripts. Content security policies (CSPs) are a great way to do that. But CSPs are cumbersome. One mistake and you have a potentially significant client-side security gap. Finding those gaps means long and tedious hours (or days) in manual code reviews through thousands of lines of script on your web applications. Automated content security policies can help streamline the code review process by first identifying all first- and third-party scripts and the assets they access, and then generating an appropriate content security policy to help better secure the client-side attack surface. There are few developers or AppSec professionals who claim to enjoy deploying CSPs. First, the CSP has to work for the specific web application. Then the team needs to make sure it provides the appropriate level of protection. The CSP also can't conflict with any existing widgets or plugins (or the decision must be made to not deploy the CSP or dea
Google Chrome Bug Could Let Hackers Bypass CSP Protection; Update Web Browsers

Google Chrome Bug Could Let Hackers Bypass CSP Protection; Update Web Browsers

Aug 11, 2020
If you haven't recently updated your Chrome, Opera, or Edge web browser to the latest available version, it would be an excellent idea to do so as quickly as possible. Cybersecurity researchers on Monday disclosed details about a zero-day flaw in Chromium-based web browsers for Windows, Mac and Android that could have allowed attackers to entirely bypass Content Security Policy (CSP) rules since Chrome 73. Tracked as CVE-2020-6519 (rated 6.5 on the CVSS scale), the issue stems from a CSP bypass that results in arbitrary execution of malicious code on target websites. According to PerimeterX, some of the most popular websites, including Facebook, Wells Fargo, Zoom, Gmail, WhatsApp, Investopedia, ESPN, Roblox, Indeed, TikTok, Instagram, Blogger, and Quora, were susceptible to the CSP bypass. Interestingly, it appears that the same flaw was also highlighted by Tencent Security Xuanwu Lab more than a year ago, just a month after the release of Chrome 73 in March 2019, but
Hackers Using Google Analytics to Bypass Web Security and Steal Credit Cards

Hackers Using Google Analytics to Bypass Web Security and Steal Credit Cards

Jun 23, 2020
Researchers reported on Monday that hackers are now exploiting Google's Analytics service to stealthily pilfer credit card information from infected e-commerce sites. According to several independent reports from PerimeterX , Kaspersky , and Sansec , threat actors are now injecting data-stealing code on the compromised websites in combination with tracking code generated by Google Analytics for their own account, letting them exfiltrate payment information entered by users even in conditions where content security policies are enforced for maximum web security. "Attackers injected malicious code into sites, which collected all the data entered by users and then sent it via Analytics," Kaspersky said in a report published yesterday. "As a result, the attackers could access the stolen data in their Google Analytics account." The cybersecurity firm said it found about two dozen infected websites across Europe and North and South America that specialized in
Another Facebook Quiz App Left 120 Million Users' Data Exposed

Another Facebook Quiz App Left 120 Million Users' Data Exposed

Jun 28, 2018
People are still getting over the most controversial data scandal of the year, i.e., Cambridge Analytica scandal , and Facebook is under fire yet again after it emerges that a popular quiz app on the social media platform exposed the private data of up to 120 million users for years. Facebook was in controversies earlier this year over a quiz app that sold data of 87 million users to a political consultancy firm, who reportedly helped Donald Trump win the US presidency in 2016. Now, a different third-party quiz app, called NameTests, found exposing data of up to 120 million Facebook users to anyone who happened to find it, an ethical hacker revealed. NameTests[.]com, the website behind popular social quizzes, like "Which Disney Princess Are You?" that has around 120 million monthly users, uses Facebook's app platform to offer a fast way to sign up. Just like any other Facebook app, signing up on the NameTests website using their app allows the company to fetch neces
Update Google Chrome Immediately to Patch a High Severity Vulnerability

Update Google Chrome Immediately to Patch a High Severity Vulnerability

Jun 06, 2018
You must update your Google Chrome now. Security researcher Michał Bentkowski discovered and reported a high severity vulnerability in Google Chrome in late May, affecting the web browsing software for all major operating systems including Windows, Mac, and Linux. Without revealing any technical detail about the vulnerability, the Chrome security team described the issue as incorrect handling of CSP header ( CVE-2018-6148 ) in a blog post published today. "Access to bug details and links may be kept restricted until a majority of users are updated with a fix. We will also retain restrictions if the bug exists in a third party library that other projects similarly depend on, but haven't yet fixed," the Chrome security team notes. Content Security Policy (CSP) header allows website administrators to add an extra layer of security on a given web page by allowing them to control resources the browser is allowed to load. Mishandling of CSP headers by your web brow
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