The Hacker News Logo
Subscribe to Newsletter

The Hacker News - Cybersecurity News and Analysis

Report: 97% of Cybersecurity Companies Have Leaked Data on the Dark Web

Report: 97% of Cybersecurity Companies Have Leaked Data on the Dark Web

September 15, 2020The Hacker News
In a new report into the global cybersecurity industry's exposure on the Dark Web this year, global application security company, ImmuniWeb , uncovered that 97% of leading cybersecurity companies have data leaks or other security incidents exposed on the Dark Web, while on average, there are over 4,000 stolen credentials and other sensitive data exposed per cybersecurity company. Even the cybersecurity industry itself is not immune to these problems, as demonstrated in ImmuniWeb's research. Key findings that the research found relating to the leading global cybersecurity companies' exposure on the Dark Web included: 97% of companies have data leaks and other security incidents exposed on the Dark Web. 631,512 verified security incidents were found with over 25% (or 160,529) of those classed as a high or critical risk level+ containing highly sensitive information such as plaintext credentials or PII, including financial or similar data. Hence, on average, there a
CISA: Chinese Hackers Exploiting Unpatched Devices to Target U.S. Agencies

CISA: Chinese Hackers Exploiting Unpatched Devices to Target U.S. Agencies

September 15, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
The US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) issued a new advisory on Monday about a wave of cyberattacks carried by Chinese nation-state actors targeting US government agencies and private entities. "CISA has observed Chinese [Ministry of State Security]-affiliated cyber threat actors operating from the People's Republic of China using commercially available information sources and open-source exploitation tools to target US Government agency networks," the cybersecurity agency said. Over the past 12 months, the victims were identified through sources such as Shodan , the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposure ( CVE ) database, and the National Vulnerabilities Database (NVD), exploiting the public release of a vulnerability to pick vulnerable targets and further their motives. By compromising legitimate websites and leveraging spear-phishing emails with malicious links pointing to attacker-owned sites in order to gain initial access, the Chinese
New Linux Malware Steals Call Details from VoIP Softswitch Systems

New Linux Malware Steals Call Details from VoIP Softswitch Systems

September 11, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
Cybersecurity researchers have discovered an entirely new kind of Linux malware dubbed "CDRThief" that targets voice over IP (VoIP) softswitches in an attempt to steal phone call metadata. "The primary goal of the malware is to exfiltrate various private data from a compromised softswitch, including call detail records ( CDR )," ESET researchers said in a Thursday analysis . "To steal this metadata, the malware queries internal MySQL databases used by the softswitch. Thus, attackers demonstrate a good understanding of the internal architecture of the targeted platform." Softswitches (short for software switches) are generally VoIP servers that allow for telecommunication networks to provide management of voice, fax, data and video traffic, and call routing. ESET's research uncovered that CDRThief targeted a specific Linux VoIP platform, namely the VOS2009 and 3000 softswitches from Chinese company Linknat, and had its malicious functionalit
New Unpatched Bluetooth Flaw Lets Hackers Easily Target Nearby Devices

New Unpatched Bluetooth Flaw Lets Hackers Easily Target Nearby Devices

September 10, 2020Mohit Kumar
Bluetooth SIG—an organization that oversees the development of Bluetooth standards—today issued a statement informing users and vendors of a newly reported unpatched vulnerability that potentially affects hundreds of millions of devices worldwide. Discovered independently by two separate teams of academic researchers, the flaw resides in the Cross-Transport Key Derivation (CTKD) of devices supporting both — Basic Rate/Enhanced Data Rate (BR/EDR) and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) standard. Cross-Transport Key Derivation (CTKD) is a Bluetooth component responsible for negotiating the authenticate keys when pairing two Bluetooth devices together, also known as "dual-mode" devices. Dubbed 'BLURtooth' and tracked as CVE-2020-15802 , the flaw exposes devices powered with Bluetooth 4.0 or 5.0 technology, allowing attackers to unauthorizedly connect to a targeted nearby device by overwriting the authenticated key or reducing the encryption key strength. "Dual-mod
Hackers Stole $5.4 Million From Eterbase Cryptocurrency Exchange

Hackers Stole $5.4 Million From Eterbase Cryptocurrency Exchange

September 10, 2020Swati Khandelwal
Cybercriminals successfully plundered another digital cryptocurrency exchange. European cryptocurrency exchange Eterbase this week disclosed a massive breach of its network by an unknown group of hackers who stole cryptocurrencies worth 5.4 million dollars. Eterbase, which has now entered maintenance mode until the security issue is resolved, described itself as Europe's Premier Digital Asset Exchange. Based in Bratislava, Slovakia, and launched in 2019, Eterbase is a small cryptocurrency exchange platform that focuses on crypto to SEPA integration (via individual IBAN accounts), multi-asset support, and regulatory compliance. On Monday night, malicious threat actors managed to raid six Eterbase's hot wallets for Bitcoin, Ethereum, XRP, Tezos, Algorand, and TRON and transferred the funds into their wallets managed at six rival crypto exchanges, Eterbase reported on its Telegram channel on Tuesday. According to a tweet posted by the affected exchange, Eterbase t
A Successful Self-Service Password Reset (SSPR) Project Requires User Adoption

A Successful Self-Service Password Reset (SSPR) Project Requires User Adoption

September 10, 2020The Hacker News
IT help desks everywhere are having to adjust to the 'new normal' of supporting mainly remote workers. This is a major shift away from visiting desks across the office and helping ones with traditional IT support processes. Many reasons end-users may contact the helpdesk. However, password related issues are arguably the most common. Since the onset of the global pandemic that began earlier this year, help desks are now dealing with password resets of users who are working remotely. Servicing users who are working remotely and assisting with password resets can be cumbersome and expose organizations to potential security risks. Self-service password reset (SSPR) solutions can significantly assist in providing the tools that remote workers need to service their accounts. However, there can be challenges with enrollment and other issues. Let's take a look at SSPR and see how businesses can manage enrollment compliance. What is Self-Service Password Reset (SSPR)
New Raccoon Attack Could Let Attackers Break SSL/TLS Encryption

New Raccoon Attack Could Let Attackers Break SSL/TLS Encryption

September 10, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
A group of researchers has detailed a new timing vulnerability in Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol that could potentially allow an attacker to break the encryption and read sensitive communication under specific conditions. Dubbed " Raccoon Attack ," the server-side attack exploits a side-channel in the cryptographic protocol (versions 1.2 and lower) to extract the shared secret key used for secure communications between two parties. "The root cause for this side channel is that the TLS standard encourages non-constant-time processing of the DH secret," the researchers explained their findings in a paper. "If the server reuses ephemeral keys, this side channel may allow an attacker to recover the premaster secret by solving an instance of the Hidden Number Problem." However, the academics stated that the vulnerability is hard to exploit and relies on very precise timing measurements and on a specific server configuration to be exploitable.
Cynet Takes Cyber Threat Protection Automation to the Next Level with Incident Engine

Cynet Takes Cyber Threat Protection Automation to the Next Level with Incident Engine

September 09, 2020The Hacker News
We have all heard of the "cybersecurity skills gap" — firms' inability to hire and retain high-level cybersecurity talent. I see this gap manifesting in two ways. First, companies that want to hire cybersecurity talent simply cannot find candidates with sufficient skills. Second, companies that cannot afford specialized cybersecurity talent and therefore lack the necessary skills to adequately protect their organizations from the growing and increasingly sophisticated cyber threats. Both of these are real problems, and both can lead to devastating consequences. It's also fair to say that most cybersecurity teams today are overworked and understaffed. One of the primary reasons we need such high-level cybersecurity skills lies in the shortcomings of cybersecurity technologies. Due to the changing and increasingly sophisticated stream of attack techniques, the breadth and depth of cybersecurity defensive technologies used to combat these threats and protect org
Cybercriminals Are Using Legit Cloud Monitoring Tools As Backdoor

Cybercriminals Are Using Legit Cloud Monitoring Tools As Backdoor

September 09, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
A cybercrime group that has previously struck Docker and Kubernetes cloud environments has evolved to repurpose genuine cloud monitoring tools as a backdoor to carry out malicious attacks, according to new research. "To our knowledge, this is the first time attackers have been caught using legitimate third party software to target cloud infrastructure," Israeli cybersecurity firm Intezer said in a Tuesday analysis. Using software called Weave Scope , which is used as a visualization and monitoring tool for Docker and Kubernetes services, the TeamTNT threat actor not only mapped the cloud environment of their victims but also executed system commands without having to deploy malicious code on the target server explicitly. TeamTNT has been active at least since late April this year, directing their attacks on misconfigured Docker ports to install a cryptocurrency mining malware and a Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) bot. Then last month , the crypto-mining gan
Microsoft Releases September 2020 Security Patches For 129 Flaws

Microsoft Releases September 2020 Security Patches For 129 Flaws

September 08, 2020Swati Khandelwal
As part of this month's Patch Tuesday, Microsoft today released a fresh batch of security updates to fix a total of 129 newly discovered security vulnerabilities affecting various versions of its Windows operating systems and related software. Of the 129 bugs spanning its various products — Microsoft Windows, Edge browser, Internet Explorer, ChakraCore, SQL Server, Exchange Server, Office, ASP.NET, OneDrive, Azure DevOps, Visual Studio, and Microsoft Dynamics — that received new patches, 23 are listed as critical, 105 are important, and one is moderate in severity. Unlike the past few months, none of the security vulnerabilities the tech giant patched in September are listed as being publicly known or under active attack at the time of release or at least not in knowledge of Microsoft. A memory corruption vulnerability ( CVE-2020-16875 ) in Microsoft Exchange software is worth highlighting all the critical flaws. The exploitation of this flaw could allow an attacker to run
Japan, France, New Zealand Warn of Sudden Uptick in Emotet Trojan Attacks

Japan, France, New Zealand Warn of Sudden Uptick in Emotet Trojan Attacks

September 08, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
Cybersecurity agencies across Asia and Europe have issued multiple security alerts regarding the resurgence of email-based Emotet malware attacks targeting businesses in France, Japan, and New Zealand. "The emails contain malicious attachments or links that the receiver is encouraged to download," New Zealand's Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) said. "These links and attachments may look like genuine invoices, financial documents, shipping information, resumes, scanned documents, or information on COVID-19, but they are fake." Echoing similar concerns, Japan's CERT (JPCERT/CC) cautioned it found a rapid increase in the number of domestic domain (.jp) email addresses that have been infected with the malware and can be misused to send spam emails in an attempt to spread the infection further. First identified in 2014 and distributed by a threat group tracked as TA542 (or Mummy Spider), Emotet has since evolved from its original roots as a s
New PIN Verification Bypass Flaw Affects Visa Contactless Payments

New PIN Verification Bypass Flaw Affects Visa Contactless Payments

September 07, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
Even as Visa issued a warning about a new JavaScript web skimmer known as Baka , cybersecurity researchers have uncovered an authentication flaw in the company's EMV enabled payment cards that permits cybercriminals to obtain funds and defraud cardholders as well as merchants illicitly. The research , published by a group of academics from the ETH Zurich, is a PIN bypass attack that allows the adversaries to leverage a victim's stolen or lost credit card for making high-value purchases without knowledge of the card's PIN, and even trick a point of sale (PoS) terminal into accepting an unauthentic offline card transaction. All modern contactless cards that make use of the Visa protocol, including Visa Credit, Visa Debit, Visa Electron, and V Pay cards, are affected by the security flaw, but the researchers posited it could apply to EMV protocols implemented by Discover and UnionPay as well. The loophole, however, doesn't impact Mastercard, American Express, and JC
SMB Cybersecurity Catching Up to Enterprise… But the Human Element Still a Major Concern

SMB Cybersecurity Catching Up to Enterprise… But the Human Element Still a Major Concern

September 07, 2020The Hacker News
Cyberattacks on small to medium-sized businesses (SMBs) are continuing at a relentless pace, with the vast majority of data breaches coming from outside the organization . Some believe hackers are aggressively targeting these smaller firms because they believe SMBs lack adequate resources and enterprise-grade security tools, making them easier prey than larger businesses. A new report from Cisco, however, challenges this assumption. SMBs have made significant strides enhancing their security protocols and are closing the gap with their bigger counterparts. The report notes 87 percent of SMB business owners rank security a top priority, and more than 99 percent have a dedicated resource focusing on security. SMBs are also becoming more diligent about defining metrics to assess their security effectiveness and implementing security controls and tools at rates similar to large enterprises. No doubt, the emergence of security solutions developed specifically for SMBs is support
Evilnum hackers targeting financial firms with a new Python-based RAT

Evilnum hackers targeting financial firms with a new Python-based RAT

September 04, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
An adversary known for targeting the fintech sector at least since 2018 has switched up its tactics to include a new Python-based remote access Trojan (RAT) that can steal passwords, documents, browser cookies, email credentials, and other sensitive information. In an analysis published by Cybereason researchers yesterday, the Evilnum group has not only tweaked its infection chain but has also deployed a Python RAT called "PyVil RAT," which possesses abilities to gather information, take screenshots, capture keystrokes data, open an SSH shell and deploy new tools. "Since the first reports in 2018 through today, the group's TTPs have evolved with different tools while the group has continued to focus on fintech targets," the cybersecurity firm said . "These variations include a change in the chain of infection and persistence, new infrastructure that is expanding over time, and the use of a new Python-scripted Remote Access Trojan (RAT)" to spy
(Live) Webinar – XDR and Beyond with Autonomous Breach Protection

(Live) Webinar – XDR and Beyond with Autonomous Breach Protection

September 03, 2020The Hacker News
Anyone paying attention to the cybersecurity technology market has heard the term XDR - Extended Detection and Response. XDR is a new technology approach that combines multiple protection technologies into a single platform. All the analyst firms are writing about it, and many of the top cybersecurity companies are actively moving into this space. Why is XDR receiving all the buzz? Combining (or orchestrating) security technologies in a usable manner has become the bane of cybersecurity as technology spread has overwhelmed the space. There's a massive market for cybersecurity technologies that combine and rationalize other cybersecurity technologies (see SIEM and SOAR). However, most companies find selecting, implementing, integrating, normalizing, operating, and maintaining a fully combined set of cybersecurity technologies far too daunting and only within reach of the largest companies with the deepest pockets. XDR Insights Next week, Senior Analyst Dave Gruber of E
Cisco Jabber Bug Could Let Hackers Target Windows Systems Remotely

Cisco Jabber Bug Could Let Hackers Target Windows Systems Remotely

September 03, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
Networking equipment maker Cisco has released a new version of its Jabber video conferencing and messaging app for Windows that includes patches for multiple vulnerabilities—which, if exploited, could allow an authenticated, remote attacker to execute arbitrary code. The flaws, which were uncovered by Norwegian cybersecurity firm Watchcom during a pentest, affect all currently supported versions of the Jabber client (12.1-12.9) and has since been fixed by the company. Two of the four flaws can be exploited to gain remote code execution (RCE) on target systems by sending specially crafted chat messages in group conversations or specific individuals. The most severe of the lot is a flaw (CVE-2020-3495, CVSS score 9.9) that's caused by improper validation of message contents, which could be leveraged by an attacker by sending maliciously-crafted Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol ( XMPP ) messages to the affected software. "A successful exploit could allow the
New Web-Based Credit Card Stealer Uses Telegram Messenger to Exfiltrate Data

New Web-Based Credit Card Stealer Uses Telegram Messenger to Exfiltrate Data

September 02, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
Cybercriminal groups are constantly evolving to find new ways to pilfer financial information, and the latest trick in their arsenal is to leverage the messaging app Telegram to their benefit. In what's a new tactic adopted by Magecart groups, the encrypted messaging service is being used to send stolen payment details from compromised websites back to the attackers. "For threat actors, this data exfiltration mechanism is efficient and doesn't require them to keep up infrastructure that could be taken down or blocked by defenders," Jérôme Segura of Malwarebytes said in a Monday analysis . "They can even receive a notification in real time for each new victim, helping them quickly monetize the stolen cards in underground markets." The TTP was first publicly documented by security researcher @AffableKraut in a Twitter thread last week using data from Dutch cybersecurity firm Sansec. Injecting e-skimmers on shopping websites by exploiting a known
Online Courses and Software

Sign up for cybersecurity newsletter and get latest news updates delivered straight to your inbox daily.