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The Hacker News - Cybersecurity News and Analysis: DNS hijacking

New York Times, Twitter and Huffington Post Domains hijacked by Syrian Electronic Army

New York Times, Twitter and Huffington Post Domains hijacked by Syrian Electronic Army

August 28, 2013Mohit Kumar
Media companies including the New York Times, Twitter and the Huffington Post has been unavailable since Tuesday after the external malicious attack by a group of hackers supporting Syrian President Bashar Assad. For the second time this month, the New York Times' website has gone down. " The New York Times website was unavailable to readers on Tuesday afternoon following an attack on the company's domain name registrar, Melbourne IT ," the Times wrote. In its most recent alleged attack, SEA was apparently able to use what's called a spear phishing attack to gain access to the Australia-based domain registrar for The New York Times website and read: " Hacked by SEA, Your server security is very weak ." It appears the domain name system (DNS) for NYTimes.com was rerouted, but can be found using its numerical Internet Protocol addresses, which is 170.149.168.130. The New York Times website has been restored just now, at least temporarily a
Thousands of websites defaced after Belgium and Netherland domain registrars hacked

Thousands of websites defaced after Belgium and Netherland domain registrars hacked

July 10, 2013Wang Wei
On Tuesday, The Foundation for Internet Domain Registration (.NL) in the Netherlands (SIDN) was compromised and some malicious files were uploaded to their server by hackers. According to a blog post ,  SQL injection vulnerability was used to compromise one of the website ( 25jaarvan.nl ) on same server initially, that allows hacker to temporarily access to the domain name registration system. " The DRS web application was shut down and zone file publication was temporarily suspended. ", company said. " As a result of our precautionary action, some areas of the website that registrars use to download registrarship-related data have been unavailable since Tuesday evening. " In another cyber attack on Tuesday, several Belgium websites was also got defaced by another group of hackers. Domain Registrar behind Belgium i.e DNS.be was compromised by attackers. The hackers were able to infiltrate and modify a DNS server, pointing all of the websites to
LinkedIn was not Hacked, suffered outage due to DNS issue

LinkedIn was not Hacked, suffered outage due to DNS issue

June 20, 2013Mohit Kumar
The LinkedIn became inaccessible for an hour last night. Few Hours before App.net co-founder Bryan Berg posted that LinkedIn DNS was hijacked but later LinkedIn confirmed that they suffered outage due to DNS issue, not Hack. DNS Hijacking is an unauthorized modification of a DNS server or change of DNS address that directs users attempting to access a web page to a different web page that looks the same, but contains extra content such as advertisements, is a competitor page, a malware page, or third-party search page. Bryan said," all of your traffic has been sent to a network hosted by this company [confluence-networks.com]. And they don't require SSL, so if you tried to visit, your browser sent your long-lived session cookies in plaintext ." LinkedIn tweeted " Our site is now recovering for some members. We determined it was a DNS issue, we're continuing to work on it. Thanks for your patience, " but provided no further details. LinkedIn DNS hacked
Algerian Hacker hijack Romanian Google and Yahoo Domain

Algerian Hacker hijack Romanian Google and Yahoo Domain

November 28, 2012Mohit Kumar
Algerian Hacker today hijack DNS Yahoo, Microsoft or Google and Paypal redirect users to a deface page. Credit being taken by Hacker going by name MCA-CRB , a serial website defacer. MCA-CRB is a prolific online graffiti artist who has defaced at least 5,000 sites, according to records kept by Zone-H. After Hijacking both domains resolve to an IP address located in the Netherlands," at 95.128.3.172 (server1.joomlapartner.nl). " When we heard about this incident, we were pretty skeptical about the attack. A site such as Google's can be theoretically hacked, but it is very unlikely. Then we noticed that both domains were directed to an IP address in the Netherlands […], so it seemed more like a DNS poisoning attack ," said Stefan Tanase from Kaspersky Lab Romania. " All we know is that Google's public DNS servers (8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4) were resolving requests for google.ro and other major .RO websites to the IP address hosting the defacement page ," Tanase said. Google
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