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Casino Gets Hacked Through Its Internet-Connected Fish Tank Thermometer

Casino Gets Hacked Through Its Internet-Connected Fish Tank Thermometer

April 16, 2018Wang Wei
Internet-connected technology, also known as the Internet of Things (IoT), is now part of daily life, with smart assistants like Siri and Alexa to cars, watches, toasters, fridges, thermostats, lights, and the list goes on and on. But of much greater concern, enterprises are unable to secure each and every device on their network, giving cybercriminals hold on their network hostage with just one insecure device. Since IoT is a double-edged sword, it not only poses huge risks to enterprises worldwide but also has the potential to severely disrupt other organisations, or the Internet itself . There's no better example than Mirai , the botnet malware that knocked the world's biggest and most popular websites offline for few hours over a year ago. We have another great example that showcases how one innocent looking insecure IoT device connected to your network can cause security nightmares. Nicole Eagan, the CEO of cybersecurity company Darktrace, told attendees at
Smart Devices Can Be Hijacked to Track Your Body Movements And Activities Remotely

Smart Devices Can Be Hijacked to Track Your Body Movements And Activities Remotely

August 20, 2017Unknown
If your smartphones, tablets, smart refrigerators, smart TVs and other smart devices are smart enough to make your life easier, their smart behavior could also be leveraged by hackers to steal data, invade your privacy or spy on you, if not secured properly. One such experiment has recently been performed by a team of student hackers, demonstrating a new attack method to turn smart devices into spying tools that could track your every move, including inferring sexual activity. Dubbed CovertBand , the attack has been developed by four researchers at the University of Washington's Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering, and is so powerful that it can record what a person is doing through a wall. The CovertBand tracking system makes use of the built-in microphones and speakers—found in smartphones, laptops, tablets, smart assistant and other smart devices—as a receiver to pick up reflected sound waves, tracking the movements of anyone near the audio sourc
Hacking A $1500 'Smart Gun' With $15 Magnets

Hacking A $1500 'Smart Gun' With $15 Magnets

July 29, 2017Mohit Kumar
I think we should stop going crazy over the smart things unless it's secure enough to be called SMART—from a toaster, security cameras, and routers to the computers and cars—everything is hackable. But the worst part comes in when these techs just require some cheap and easily available kinds of stuff to get compromised. Want example? It took just cheap magnets purchased from Amazon online store for a security researcher to unlock a "smart" gun that only its owner can fire. The German manufacturer of the Armatix IP1 "smart" gun which claimed the weapon would 'usher in a new era of gun safety' as the gun would only fire by its owners who are wearing an accompanying smartwatch. However, for the first time, a skilled hacker and security researcher who goes by the pseudonym "Plore" found multiple ways to defeat the security of Armatix GmbH Smart System and its $1,400 smart gun. According to a detailed report by Wired , the smart idea
Smart Vacuum Cleaners Making Map Of Your Home — And Wants to Sell It

Smart Vacuum Cleaners Making Map Of Your Home — And Wants to Sell It

July 26, 2017Swati Khandelwal
What if I say that your cute, smart robotic vacuum cleaner is collecting data than just dirt? During an interview with Reuters, the CEO of iRobot, the company which manufactured Roomba device, has revealed that the robotic vacuum cleaner also builds a map of your home while cleaning — and is now planning to sell this data to third-party companies. I know it sounds really creepy, but this is what the iRobot company has planned with the home mapping data its Roomba robots collect on its users. What is Roomba? Manufactured by Massachusetts-based firm iRobot, Roomba is a cute little robotic vacuum cleaner — which ranges in price from $375 to $899 — that has been vacuuming up household dirt since 2002. Early versions of Roomba used IR or laser sensors to avoid obstacles in their way, but the company began distributing high-end Wi-Fi-connected Roomba models from 2015, such as the Roomba 980, which includes a camera and Simultaneous Localisation And Mapping (SLAM) technology tha
Remotely Exploitable Flaw Puts Millions of Internet-Connected Devices at Risk

Remotely Exploitable Flaw Puts Millions of Internet-Connected Devices at Risk

July 18, 2017Swati Khandelwal
Security researchers have discovered a critical remotely exploitable vulnerability in an open-source software development library used by major manufacturers of the Internet-of-Thing devices that eventually left millions of devices vulnerable to hacking. The vulnerability (CVE-2017-9765), discovered by researchers at the IoT-focused security firm Senrio, resides in the software development library called gSOAP toolkit (Simple Object Access Protocol) — an advanced C/C++ auto-coding tool for developing XML Web services and XML application. Dubbed " Devil's Ivy ," the stack buffer overflow vulnerability allows a remote attacker to crash the SOAP WebServices daemon and could be exploited to execute arbitrary code on the vulnerable devices. The Devil's Ivy vulnerability was discovered by researchers while analysing an Internet-connected security camera manufactured by Axis Communications. "When exploited, it allows an attacker to remotely access a video
Internet-Connected Medical Washer-Disinfector Found Vulnerable to Hacking

Internet-Connected Medical Washer-Disinfector Found Vulnerable to Hacking

March 27, 2017Swati Khandelwal
Internet-of-Things devices are turning every industry into the computer industry, making customers think that their lives would be much easier with smart devices. There are, of course, some really good reasons to connect certain devices to the Internet. For example, remotely switching on your A/C a few minutes before you enter your home, instead of leaving it blasting all day. But does everything need to be connected? Of course, not. One such example is the latest bug report at Full Disclosure, affecting an Internet-connected washer-disinfector appliance by Germany-based manufacturer Miele . The Miele Professional PG 8528 appliance, which is used in medical establishments to clean and properly disinfect laboratory and surgical instruments, is suffering from a Web Server Directory Traversal vulnerability. Jens Regel of German consultancy Schneider & Wulf has discovered the flaw ( CVE-2017-7240 ) that allows an unauthenticated, remote attacker to access directories oth
Smile! Hackers Can Remotely Access Your Samsung SmartCam Security Cameras

Smile! Hackers Can Remotely Access Your Samsung SmartCam Security Cameras

January 18, 2017Swati Khandelwal
It's not necessary to break into your computer or smartphone to spy on you. Today all devices in our home are becoming more connected to networks than ever to make our lives easy. But what's worrisome is that these connected devices can be turned against us, anytime, due to lack of stringent security measures and insecure encryption mechanisms implemented in these Internet of Things (IoTs) devices. The most recent victim of this issue is the Samsung's range of SmartCam home security cameras. Yes, it's hell easy to hijack the popular Samsung SmartCam security cameras, as they contain a critical remote code execution (RCE) vulnerability that could let hackers gain root access and take full control of these devices. SmartCam is one of the Samsung's SmartThings range of devices, which allows its users to connect, manage, monitor and control "smart" devices in their home using their smartphones or tablets. Back in 2014, the hacking group Exploiteer
FTC sets $25,000 Prize for Automatic IoT Patch Management Solution

FTC sets $25,000 Prize for Automatic IoT Patch Management Solution

January 04, 2017Mohit Kumar
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has announced a "prize competition" for creating a software or hardware-based solution with the ability to auto-patch vulnerable Internet of Things (IoT) devices. Today we are surrounded by a number of Internet-connected devices. Our homes are filled with tiny computers embedded in everything from security cameras, TVs and refrigerators to thermostat and door locks. While IoT is going to improve life for many, the number of security risks due to lack of stringent security measures and encryption mechanisms in the devices have increased exponentially, giving attackers a large number of entry points to affect you in some or the other way. Remember Mirai Botnet ? A botnet of just 100,000 hijacked IoT devices was used to flood the Dyn DNS service with unwanted requests and close down the Internet for Millions of Users a few months ago. At that time, Chinese firm Hangzhou Xiongmai Technology admitted its smart products – DVRs and
Police Ask for Amazon Echo Data to Help Solve a Murder Case

Police Ask for Amazon Echo Data to Help Solve a Murder Case

December 28, 2016Swati Khandelwal
Hey, Alexa! Who did this murder? Arkansas police are seeking help from e-commerce giant Amazon for data that may have been recorded on its Echo device belonging to a suspect in a murder case, bringing the conflict into the realm of the Internet of Things. Amazon Echo is a voice-activated smart home speaker capable of controlling several smart devices by integrating it with a variety of home automation hubs. It can do tasks like play music, make to-do lists, set alarms, and also provide real-time information such as weather and traffic. As first reported by The Information, authorities in Bentonville have issued a warrant for Amazon to hand over audio or records from an Echo device belonging to James Andrew Bates in the hope that they'll aid in uncovering additional details about the murder of Victor Collins. Just like Apple refused the FBI to help them unlock iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino terrorists, Amazon also declined to give police any of the info
Google 'Android Things' — An Operating System for the Internet of Things

Google 'Android Things' — An Operating System for the Internet of Things

December 21, 2016Wang Wei
Google announced a Developers Preview of " Android Things " — an Android-based operating system platform for smart devices and Internet of Things (IoT) products. The Android-based Internet of Things OS is designed to make it easier for developers to build a smart appliance since they will be able to work with Android APIs and Google Services they're already familiar with. As the Developers page of Android Things says: " If you can build an app, you can build a device ." The Android-based Internet of Things operating system is supposed to run on products like security cameras, connected speakers, and routers. Android Things is a rebranded version Google Brillo , an Android-based IoT OS that Google announced in 2015, with added tools like Android Studio, the Android Software Development Kit (SDK), Google Play Services, and Google Cloud Platform. Unlike Brillo, development on Android Things can be achieved with " the same developer tools as stan
Friday's Massive DDoS Attack Came from Just 100,000 Hacked IoT Devices

Friday's Massive DDoS Attack Came from Just 100,000 Hacked IoT Devices

October 27, 2016Swati Khandelwal
Guess how many devices participated in last Friday's massive DDoS attack against DNS provider Dyn that caused vast internet outage? Just 100,000 devices. I did not miss any zeros. Dyn disclosed on Wednesday that a botnet of an estimated 100,000 internet-connected devices was hijacked to flood its systems with unwanted requests and close down the Internet for millions of users. Dyn executive vice president Scott Hilton has issued a statement , saying all compromised devices have been infected with a notorious Mirai malware that has the ability to take over cameras, DVRs, and routers. "We're still working on analyzing the data but the estimate at the time of this report is up to 100,000 malicious endpoints," Hilton said. "We are able to confirm that a significant volume of attack traffic originated from Mirai-based botnets." Mirai malware scans for Internet of Things (IoT) devices that are still using their default passwords and then enslaves those
Challenge! WIN $50,000 for Finding Non-traditional Ways to Detect Vulnerable IoT Devices

Challenge! WIN $50,000 for Finding Non-traditional Ways to Detect Vulnerable IoT Devices

October 10, 2016Mohit Kumar
If you are concerned about the insecurity of Internet of Things, have good hands at programming and know how to hack smart devices, then you can grab an opportunity to earn $50,000 in prize money for discovering the non-traditional ways to secure IoT devices. Internet of Things (IoT) market is going to expand rapidly over the next decade. We already have 6.5 billion to 8 billion IoT devices connected to the Internet worldwide, and the number is expected to reach 50 billion by 2020. While IoT is going to improve life for many, the number of security risks due to lack of stringent security measures and encryption mechanisms in the devices have increased exponentially. This rise in the number of security risks would continue to widen the attack surface, giving hackers a large number of entry points to affect you some or the other way. Recently, we saw a record-breaking DDoS attack (Distributed Denial of Service) against the France-based hosting provider OVH that reached over
World's largest 1 Tbps DDoS Attack launched from 152,000 hacked Smart Devices

World's largest 1 Tbps DDoS Attack launched from 152,000 hacked Smart Devices

September 28, 2016Swati Khandelwal
Do you know — Your Smart Devices may have inadvertently participated in a record-breaking largest cyber attack that Internet has just witnessed. If you own a smart device like Internet-connected televisions, cars, refrigerators or thermostats, you might already be part of a botnet of millions of infected devices that was used to launch the biggest DDoS attack known to date, with peaks of over 1 Tbps of traffic. France-based hosting provider OVH was the victim to the record-breaking Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that reached over one terabit per second (1 Tbps) over the past week. As the Internet of Things (IoT) or connected devices are growing at a great pace, they continue to widen the attack surface at the same time, giving attackers a large number of entry points to affect you some or the other way. 1 Tbps DDoS Attack Hits OVH IoTs are currently being deployed in a large variety of devices throughout your home, businesses, hospitals, and even entire cities (
How to Hack Smart Bluetooth Locks and IoT Devices — Check this Out

How to Hack Smart Bluetooth Locks and IoT Devices — Check this Out

September 13, 2016Wang Wei
Bluetooth Low Energy, also known as Bluetooth Smart or Bluetooth 4, is the leading protocol designed for connecting IoT devices, medical equipment, smart homes and like most emerging technologies, security is often an afterthought. As devices become more and more embedded in our daily lives, vulnerabilities have real impact on our digital and physical security. Enter the Bluetooth lock, promising digital key convenience with temporary and Internet shareable access. The problem is, almost all of these locks have vulnerabilities, easily exploited via Bluetooth! DEF CON always has the coolest new hacks and security news, and this year was no exception. The hacking conferences are a great way to get a pulse on the general status of the security world, what people are interested in, worried about, or looking to exploit. This year clearly had an uptick in Internet of Things (IoT) devices and ways to hack them. Obviously, we had to go and take a look at the Bluetooth lock hack, and
First-Ever Ransomware For Smart Thermostat is Here — It's Hot!

First-Ever Ransomware For Smart Thermostat is Here — It's Hot!

August 08, 2016Swati Khandelwal
Internet of Things (IoT) is the latest buzz in the world of technology, but they are much easier to hack than you think. Until now we have heard many scary stories of hacking IoT devices , but how realistic is the threat? Just think of a scenario where you enter in your house, and it's sweltering, but when you head on to check the temperature of your thermostat, you find out that it has been locked to 99 degrees. And guess what? Your room thermostat is demanding $300 in Bitcoins to regain its control. Congratulations, Your Thermostat has been Hacked! This is not just a hypothetical scenario; this is exactly what Ken Munro and Andrew Tierney of UK-based security firm Pen Test Partners have demonstrated at the DEFCON 24 security conference in Las Vegas last Saturday. Two white hat hackers recently showed off the first proof-of-concept (PoC) ransomware that infects a smart thermostat. Ransomware is an infamous piece of malware that has been known for locking up comput
Most Vulnerable Smart Cities to Cyber Attack on Internet of Things (IoT)

Most Vulnerable Smart Cities to Cyber Attack on Internet of Things (IoT)

July 31, 2015Khyati Jain
Imagine… You drive to work in your Smart-Car connected to the GPS automatically, but a hacker breaks into your car's network, takes control of the steering wheel, crashes you into a tree, and BOOM ! Believe it or not, such cyber attacks on smart devices are becoming reality. Car Hacking was recently demonstrated by a pair of security researchers who controlled a Jeep Cherokee remotely from miles away, which shows a rather severe threat to the growing market of the Internet of Things (IoT) . Internet of Things (IoT) — A technology that connects objects to a network or the Internet, and enables interaction among varied devices such as: Smart Cars Smart TVs Refrigerators Wearables Routers Other embedded computing as well as non-computing devices. Few days back, I had read about Smart Dustbins that are the latest smart objects to become Wi-Fi-enabled. Internet of Things to make Cities Smart or Dumb? Cities around the world are becoming
Smart LED Lightbulbs Can be Hacked too; Vulnerability exposes Wi-Fi Passwords

Smart LED Lightbulbs Can be Hacked too; Vulnerability exposes Wi-Fi Passwords

July 08, 2014Swati Khandelwal
Until now, we have seen how different smart home appliances such as refrigerators, TVs and routers could expose our private data, but now you can add another worry to your list —LED light bulb. Don’t laugh! It’s true. Researchers at UK security firm Context have formulated an attack against the Wi-Fi connected lightbulbs, which is available to buy in the UK, that exposes credentials of the Wi-Fi network, it relies on to operate, to anyone in accessibility to one of the LED devices. Security vulnerabilities found in the LIFX Smart light bulbs , that can be controlled by the iOS-based and Android-based devices, could allow an attacker to gain access to a “master bulb” and with the help of that they could control all connected bulbs across that network, and help them expose user network configurations. Along with other Internet of Things (IoTs) devices, the smart bulbs are part of a rising trend in which the manufacturers enclose computing and networking capabilities to their devices s
World’s First Google Glass Spyware app unveiled

World’s First Google Glass Spyware app unveiled

March 20, 2014Swati Khandelwal
In the mob of Smart Devices, after Smartphones... Google glass would definitely be the next must-have device. It’s non-other than a small computer you wear like eyeglasses allows you to surf the Web, email, text, take photos, live videos and more, -- all hands free. Google Glasses are yet in very limited release, but researchers have developed the world’s first spyware that could hijack your Google’s Glass computer eyepieces. Two Polytechnic graduate researchers, 22-year-old Mike Lady and 24-year-old Kim Paterson , from California designed an app that has the capability to convert the Google Glass into a Spy Camera, click a photo every ten seconds without giving any visible sign to the wearer, Forbes reported yesterday . The malware app developed by the researchers, masquerades itself as a fair piece of note-taking software, ironically dubbed as ‘ Malnotes ’, that trick users accept the permissions which allow them to capture images of whatever the glass wearer is l
Hacking a Car remotely with $20 iPhone sized Device

Hacking a Car remotely with $20 iPhone sized Device

February 08, 2014Swati Khandelwal
In the era of Smart devices, we have Smartphones, Smart TVs, Smart Fridges, and even the Smart cars! We have made our life very easy and comfortable by providing the master control of every task to such smart devices. But imagine if an attacker wants to take revenge or hurt someone, now they can hack your car, rather failing breaks in the traditional way. Sounds Horrible ! WELL, Two Security researchers - Javier Vazquez-Vidal and Alberto Garcia Illera have developed a home-made gadget called ' CAN Hacking Tools (CHT) ', a tiny device smaller than your Smartphone, which is enough to hack your Cars. The Kit costs less than $20, but is far capable to give away the entire control of your car to an attacker from windows and headlights to its steering and brakes. The device uses the Controller Area Network (CAN) ports that are built into cars for computer-system checks, and draws power from the car’s electrical system. Injecting a malicious code to CAN ports all
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