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Hacking Firmware from Mobile Phone Hacking Company Leaked Online

Hacking Firmware from Mobile Phone Hacking Company Leaked Online

Oct 26, 2016
The Israeli firm Cellebrite , which provides digital forensics tools and software to help law enforcement access mobile phones in investigations, has had its firmware and software leaked online. Yes, you heard that right. Cellebrite's most sensitive in-house capabilities have been made public by one of its products' resellers, who is now distributing copies of Cellebrite's firmware and software for anyone to download. The apparent reseller is McSira Professional Solutions , which hosts software for various versions of Cellebrite's Universal Forensic Extraction Device (UFED). UFED is one of the company's key products that help investigators bypass the security mechanisms of mobile phones, especially iPhones, and extract all data and passwords from them. For the Cellebrite's hand on iOS devices, you can watch the 2015 YouTube video (below), which demonstrates one of the company's products that unlocked the iPhone device in few hours. Download  L
Forensic Firm that Unlocked Terrorist's iPhone 5C is Close to Crack iPhone 6

Forensic Firm that Unlocked Terrorist's iPhone 5C is Close to Crack iPhone 6

Apr 11, 2016
The FBI didn't disclose the identity of the third-party company that helped them access the San Bernardino iPhone, but it has been widely believed that the Israeli mobile forensic firm Cellebrite was hired by the FBI to put an end to the Apple vs. FBI case. For those unfamiliar in the Apple vs. FBI case: Apple was engaged in a legal battle with the Department of Justice over a court order that was forcing the company to write software, which could disable passcode protection on terrorist's iPhone, helping them access data on it. However, Apple refused to comply with the court order, so the FBI hired an unknown third-party firm, most likely Cellebrite, who managed to successfully hack the locked iPhone 5C used by the terrorist in the San Bernardino shooting incident last year. The new method helped the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to hack iPhone 5C, but that wasn't the FBI's victory as the method didn't work on iPhone 5S and later iPhone
6 Ways to Simplify SaaS Identity Governance

6 Ways to Simplify SaaS Identity Governance

Feb 21, 2024SaaS Security / Identity Management
With SaaS applications now making up the vast majority of technology used by employees in most organizations, tasks related to identity governance need to happen across a myriad of individual SaaS apps. This presents a huge challenge for centralized IT teams who are ultimately held responsible for managing and securing app access, but can't possibly become experts in the nuances of the native security settings and access controls for hundreds (or thousands) of apps. And, even if they could, the sheer volume of tasks would easily bury them. Modern IT teams need a way to orchestrate and govern SaaS identity governance by engaging the application owners in the business who are most familiar with how the tool is used, and who needs what type of access.  Nudge Security is a  SaaS security and governance solution  that can help you do just that, with automated workflows to save time and make the process manageable at scale. Read on to learn how it works. 1 . Discover all SaaS apps used b
Apple Decrypts Seized iPhones For The Police

Apple Decrypts Seized iPhones For The Police

May 10, 2013
The security features built into Apple 's iOS software are so good that the police are unable to gain access to defendant's iPhones when they need to.  Companies like Apple and Google are being asked by law enforcement officials to bypass these protections to aid in investigations. Apple receives so many police demands to decrypt seized iPhones that it has created a waiting list to handle the deluge of requests. In one of the recent cases, according to court documents, the federal agents were baffled by the encrypted iPhone 4S of a man in Kentucky who was charged for supplying crack cocaine. CNET reports that ATF agent Rob Maynard spent three months trying to "locate a local, state, or federal law enforcement agency with the forensic capabilities to unlock" an iPhone 4S. After everyone said that they did not have the capabilities, Maynard turned to Apple. Apple can reportedly bypass the security lock to get access to data on a phone, download it to an external devic
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NIST Cybersecurity Framework: Your Go-To Cybersecurity Standard is Changing

websiteArmorPointCybersecurity / Risk Management
Find everything you need to know to prepare for NIST CSF 2.0's impending release in this guide.
Researchers grab cryptographic keys from Frozen Android Phones

Researchers grab cryptographic keys from Frozen Android Phones

Mar 08, 2013
Using a new attack on most popular Android phones platform, a team of researchers in Germany managed to grab stored cryptographic keys if the device is frozen state for an hour. The method which able to bypasses Google's data scrambling encryption system introduced in Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich to reveal the phone's hidden data, when leaving Android phones in a freezer until they fell below -10 degrees Celsius, which revealed previously scrambled data, including contact lists, browsing histories, and photos. The team developed software called FROST , Forensic Recovery of Scrambled Telephones, which lets them copy data from the phone for analysis on a computer. Abstract   explains ," We present FROST, a tool set that supports the forensic recovery of scrambled telephones. To this end we perform cold boot attacks against Android smartphones and retrieve disk encryption keys from RAM. We show that cold boot attacks against Android phones are generally possible fo
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