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Report: 97% of Cybersecurity Companies Have Leaked Data on the Dark Web

Report: 97% of Cybersecurity Companies Have Leaked Data on the Dark Web

September 15, 2020The Hacker News
In a new report into the global cybersecurity industry's exposure on the Dark Web this year, global application security company, ImmuniWeb , uncovered that 97% of leading cybersecurity companies have data leaks or other security incidents exposed on the Dark Web, while on average, there are over 4,000 stolen credentials and other sensitive data exposed per cybersecurity company. Even the cybersecurity industry itself is not immune to these problems, as demonstrated in ImmuniWeb's research. Key findings that the research found relating to the leading global cybersecurity companies' exposure on the Dark Web included: 97% of companies have data leaks and other security incidents exposed on the Dark Web. 631,512 verified security incidents were found with over 25% (or 160,529) of those classed as a high or critical risk level+ containing highly sensitive information such as plaintext credentials or PII, including financial or similar data. Hence, on average, there a
CISA: Chinese Hackers Exploiting Unpatched Devices to Target U.S. Agencies

CISA: Chinese Hackers Exploiting Unpatched Devices to Target U.S. Agencies

September 15, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
The US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) issued a new advisory on Monday about a wave of cyberattacks carried by Chinese nation-state actors targeting US government agencies and private entities. "CISA has observed Chinese [Ministry of State Security]-affiliated cyber threat actors operating from the People's Republic of China using commercially available information sources and open-source exploitation tools to target US Government agency networks," the cybersecurity agency said. Over the past 12 months, the victims were identified through sources such as Shodan , the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposure ( CVE ) database, and the National Vulnerabilities Database (NVD), exploiting the public release of a vulnerability to pick vulnerable targets and further their motives. By compromising legitimate websites and leveraging spear-phishing emails with malicious links pointing to attacker-owned sites in order to gain initial access, the Chinese
New Linux Malware Steals Call Details from VoIP Softswitch Systems

New Linux Malware Steals Call Details from VoIP Softswitch Systems

September 11, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
Cybersecurity researchers have discovered an entirely new kind of Linux malware dubbed "CDRThief" that targets voice over IP (VoIP) softswitches in an attempt to steal phone call metadata. "The primary goal of the malware is to exfiltrate various private data from a compromised softswitch, including call detail records ( CDR )," ESET researchers said in a Thursday analysis . "To steal this metadata, the malware queries internal MySQL databases used by the softswitch. Thus, attackers demonstrate a good understanding of the internal architecture of the targeted platform." Softswitches (short for software switches) are generally VoIP servers that allow for telecommunication networks to provide management of voice, fax, data and video traffic, and call routing. ESET's research uncovered that CDRThief targeted a specific Linux VoIP platform, namely the VOS2009 and 3000 softswitches from Chinese company Linknat, and had its malicious functionalit
New Unpatched Bluetooth Flaw Lets Hackers Easily Target Nearby Devices

New Unpatched Bluetooth Flaw Lets Hackers Easily Target Nearby Devices

September 10, 2020Mohit Kumar
Bluetooth SIG—an organization that oversees the development of Bluetooth standards—today issued a statement informing users and vendors of a newly reported unpatched vulnerability that potentially affects hundreds of millions of devices worldwide. Discovered independently by two separate teams of academic researchers, the flaw resides in the Cross-Transport Key Derivation (CTKD) of devices supporting both — Basic Rate/Enhanced Data Rate (BR/EDR) and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) standard. Cross-Transport Key Derivation (CTKD) is a Bluetooth component responsible for negotiating the authenticate keys when pairing two Bluetooth devices together, also known as "dual-mode" devices. Dubbed 'BLURtooth' and tracked as CVE-2020-15802 , the flaw exposes devices powered with Bluetooth 4.0 or 5.0 technology, allowing attackers to unauthorizedly connect to a targeted nearby device by overwriting the authenticated key or reducing the encryption key strength. "Dual-mod
Hackers Stole $5.4 Million From Eterbase Cryptocurrency Exchange

Hackers Stole $5.4 Million From Eterbase Cryptocurrency Exchange

September 10, 2020Swati Khandelwal
Cybercriminals successfully plundered another digital cryptocurrency exchange. European cryptocurrency exchange Eterbase this week disclosed a massive breach of its network by an unknown group of hackers who stole cryptocurrencies worth 5.4 million dollars. Eterbase, which has now entered maintenance mode until the security issue is resolved, described itself as Europe's Premier Digital Asset Exchange. Based in Bratislava, Slovakia, and launched in 2019, Eterbase is a small cryptocurrency exchange platform that focuses on crypto to SEPA integration (via individual IBAN accounts), multi-asset support, and regulatory compliance. On Monday night, malicious threat actors managed to raid six Eterbase's hot wallets for Bitcoin, Ethereum, XRP, Tezos, Algorand, and TRON and transferred the funds into their wallets managed at six rival crypto exchanges, Eterbase reported on its Telegram channel on Tuesday. According to a tweet posted by the affected exchange, Eterbase t
A Successful Self-Service Password Reset (SSPR) Project Requires User Adoption

A Successful Self-Service Password Reset (SSPR) Project Requires User Adoption

September 10, 2020The Hacker News
IT help desks everywhere are having to adjust to the 'new normal' of supporting mainly remote workers. This is a major shift away from visiting desks across the office and helping ones with traditional IT support processes. Many reasons end-users may contact the helpdesk. However, password related issues are arguably the most common. Since the onset of the global pandemic that began earlier this year, help desks are now dealing with password resets of users who are working remotely. Servicing users who are working remotely and assisting with password resets can be cumbersome and expose organizations to potential security risks. Self-service password reset (SSPR) solutions can significantly assist in providing the tools that remote workers need to service their accounts. However, there can be challenges with enrollment and other issues. Let's take a look at SSPR and see how businesses can manage enrollment compliance. What is Self-Service Password Reset (SSPR)
New Raccoon Attack Could Let Attackers Break SSL/TLS Encryption

New Raccoon Attack Could Let Attackers Break SSL/TLS Encryption

September 10, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
A group of researchers has detailed a new timing vulnerability in Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol that could potentially allow an attacker to break the encryption and read sensitive communication under specific conditions. Dubbed " Raccoon Attack ," the server-side attack exploits a side-channel in the cryptographic protocol (versions 1.2 and lower) to extract the shared secret key used for secure communications between two parties. "The root cause for this side channel is that the TLS standard encourages non-constant-time processing of the DH secret," the researchers explained their findings in a paper. "If the server reuses ephemeral keys, this side channel may allow an attacker to recover the premaster secret by solving an instance of the Hidden Number Problem." However, the academics stated that the vulnerability is hard to exploit and relies on very precise timing measurements and on a specific server configuration to be exploitable.
Cynet Takes Cyber Threat Protection Automation to the Next Level with Incident Engine

Cynet Takes Cyber Threat Protection Automation to the Next Level with Incident Engine

September 09, 2020The Hacker News
We have all heard of the "cybersecurity skills gap" — firms' inability to hire and retain high-level cybersecurity talent. I see this gap manifesting in two ways. First, companies that want to hire cybersecurity talent simply cannot find candidates with sufficient skills. Second, companies that cannot afford specialized cybersecurity talent and therefore lack the necessary skills to adequately protect their organizations from the growing and increasingly sophisticated cyber threats. Both of these are real problems, and both can lead to devastating consequences. It's also fair to say that most cybersecurity teams today are overworked and understaffed. One of the primary reasons we need such high-level cybersecurity skills lies in the shortcomings of cybersecurity technologies. Due to the changing and increasingly sophisticated stream of attack techniques, the breadth and depth of cybersecurity defensive technologies used to combat these threats and protect org
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