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Want More Secure Software? Start Recognizing Security-Skilled Developers

Want More Secure Software? Start Recognizing Security-Skilled Developers

Oct 05, 2022
Professional developers want to do the right thing, but in terms of security, they are rarely set up for success. Organizations must support their upskilling with precision training and incentives if they want secure software from the ground up. The cyber threat landscape grows more complex by the day, with our data widely considered highly desirable "digital gold". Attackers are constantly scanning networks for vulnerable applications, programs, cloud instances, and the latest flavor of the month is APIs, with Gartner  correctly predicting  that they would become the most common attack vector in 2022, and that is in no small part thanks to their often lax security controls.  Threat actors are so persistent that new apps can sometimes be compromised and exploited within hours of deployment. The  Verizon 2022 Data Breach Investigations Report  reveals that errors and misconfigurations were the cause of 13% of breaches, with the human element responsible overall for 82% of the 23,000
The Ultimate Security Blind Spot You Don't Know You Have

The Ultimate Security Blind Spot You Don't Know You Have

Sep 02, 2022
How much time do developers spend actually writing code? According to recent studies , developers spend more time maintaining, testing and securing existing code than they do writing or improving code. Security vulnerabilities have a bad habit of popping up during the software development process, only to surface after an application has been deployed. The disappointing part is that many of these security flaws and bugs could have been resolved in an earlier stage and there are proper methods and tools to uncover them. How much time does a developer spend on learning to write a functioning code? And how much is spent on learning about code security? Or learning how not to code?" Wouldn't it be better to eradicate the problem from the system rather than having it there, and then trying to detect and stop an ongoing attack targeting it? You can test your secure coding skills with this short  self-assessment. The true cost of bugs Everyone makes mistakes, even developers.
Two Key Ways Development Teams Can Increase Their Security Maturity

Two Key Ways Development Teams Can Increase Their Security Maturity

Aug 01, 2022
Now more than ever, organizations need to enable their development teams to build and grow their security skills. Today organizations face a threat landscape where individuals, well-financed syndicates, and state actors are actively trying to exploit errors in software. Yet, according to recent global research, 67% of developers that were interviewed said they were still shipping code they knew contained vulnerabilities.  Helping your development teams progress to achieve security maturity is possible, and ultimately beneficial. It will help ensure secure software development at every stage of the software development lifecycle. But how can you help your development teams reach security maturity? We dug deep and leveraged insights from over 400 of our customers to identify traits and behaviors that occur when a development team increases its security maturity. Here we share two of them: #1: A deep understanding of your gaps Before creating any maturity program, we first need to u
An Easier Way to Keep Old Python Code Healthy and Secure

An Easier Way to Keep Old Python Code Healthy and Secure

Jul 22, 2022
Python has its pros and cons, but it's nonetheless used extensively. For example, Python is frequently used in data crunching tasks even when there are more appropriate languages to choose from. Why? Well, Python is relatively easy to learn. Someone with a science background can pick up Python much more quickly than, say, C. However, Python's inherent approachability also creates a couple of problems. Whenever Python is updated, it means a big refactoring workload, which often gets dealt with poorly – or not at all. That leads to poor performance and security vulnerabilities. But maybe there is a better way: a tool to keep your Python tasks running smoothly and securely day in, day out. Let's take a look. It's slow, but it does the job Python isn't the fastest language around, but despite its comparative disadvantages, you'll often see it used for intensive data crunching operations. Think machine learning, computer vision, or even pure math in high-perform
Why Developers Hate Changing Language Versions

Why Developers Hate Changing Language Versions

Jul 08, 2022
Progress powers technology forward. But progress also has a cost: by adding new capabilities and features, the developer community is constantly adjusting the building blocks. That includes the fundamental languages used to code technology solutions. When the building blocks change, the code behind the technology solution must change too. It's a challenging and time-consuming exercise that drains resources. But what if there's an alternative? The problem: reading code someone else wrote Let's take a step back and take a look at one of the fundamental challenges in development: editing someone else's code. Editing code you just wrote, or wrote a couple of weeks ago, is just fine. But editing your own code written years ago – never mind someone else's code - that's a different story. In-house code style rules can help but there are always odd naming conventions for variables and functions, or unusual choices for algorithms. Arguably, a programmer's abilit
The Importance of Defining Secure Code

The Importance of Defining Secure Code

May 05, 2022
The developers who create the software, applications and programs that drive digital business have become the lifeblood of many organizations. Most modern businesses would not be able to (profitably) function, without competitive applications and programs, or without 24-hour access to their websites and other infrastructure. And yet, these very same touchpoints are also often the gateway that hackers and other nefarious users employ in order to steal information, launch attacks and springboard to other criminal activities such as fraud and ransomware.  Successful attacks remain prevalent, even though spending on cybersecurity in most organizations is way up, and even though movements  like DevSecOps  are shifting security towards those developers who are the lifeblood of business today. Developers understand the importance of security, and overwhelmingly want to deploy secure and quality code, but software vulnerabilities continue to be exploited.  Why? For the 2nd year, Secure Co
Incentivizing Developers is the Key to Better Security Practices

Incentivizing Developers is the Key to Better Security Practices

Sep 30, 2021
Professional developers want to embrace DevSecOps and write secure code, but their organizations need to support this seachange if they want that effort to grow. The cyber threat landscape is becoming more complex by the day. Attackers are constantly scanning networks for vulnerable applications, programs, cloud instances, and the latest flavor of the month is APIs, widely considered an easy win thanks to their often lax security controls. They are so persistent that new apps can sometimes be compromised and exploited within hours of deployment. The Verizon 2021 Data Breach Investigations Report makes it very clear that the threats leveled against businesses and organizations  are more dangerous  today than at any other point in history. It's becoming very clear that the only way to truly fortify the software being created is to ensure that it's built on secure code. In other words, the best way to stop the threat actor invasion is to deny them a foothold into your applications in
Shifting the focus from reactive to proactive, with human-led secure coding

Shifting the focus from reactive to proactive, with human-led secure coding

Jun 07, 2021
The same 10 software vulnerabilities have caused more security breaches in the last 20+ years than any others. And yet, many businesses still opt for post-breach, post-event remediation, muddling through the human and business ramifications of it all. But now,  a new research study  points to a new, human-led direction. ‍ The following discusses insights derived from a study conducted by Secure Code Warrior with Evans Data Corp titled 'Shifting from reaction to prevention: The changing face of application security' (2021) exploring developers attitudes towards secure coding, secure code practices, and security operations.  Read the report. ‍‍In the study, developers and development managers were asked about their common secure coding practices. The top three methods highlighted were: Scanning applications for irregularities or vulnerabilities after they are deployed Scrutinizing write code to inspect for irregularities or vulnerabilities The reuse of pre-approved code t
How to Create a Culture of Kick-Ass DevSecOps Engineers

How to Create a Culture of Kick-Ass DevSecOps Engineers

Jun 01, 2020
Much like technology itself, the tools, techniques, and optimum processes for developing code evolve quickly. We humans have an insatiable need for more software, more features, more functionality… and we want it faster than ever before, more qualitative, and on top of that: Secure. With an estimated 68% of organizations experiencing zero-day attacks from undisclosed/unknown vulnerabilities in 2019, this is an upward trend that we need to address as an industry by shipping secure code at a reasonable speed. While many people and organizations are moving on from Waterfall to Agile — and not everybody is there yet, let's be real — they are already encountering a new problem. Development teams and their operations counterparts are still working in silos, and this is still causing headaches for development managers and their counterparts across the business. In this environment, how can small teams working in an Agile way deliver on that promise of faster deployment, and fast
5 Reasons Why Programmers Should Think like Hackers

5 Reasons Why Programmers Should Think like Hackers

Dec 16, 2019
Programming has five main steps: the identification and definition of the problem, the planning of the solution for the problem, coding of the program, testing, and documentation. It's a meticulous process that cannot be completed without going through all the essential points. In all of these, security must be taken into account. As you come up with a solution to the problem and write the code for it, you need to make sure security is kept intact. Cyber attacks are becoming more and more prevalent, and the trend is unlikely to change in the foreseeable future. As individuals, businesses, organizations, and governments become more reliant on technology, cybercrime is expected to only grow. Most of what people do in contemporary society involves the internet, computers, and apps/software. It's only logical for programmers to be mindful of the security aspect of making applications or software. It's not enough for programmers to produce something that works. After
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