#1 Trusted Cybersecurity News Platform Followed by 4.50+ million
The Hacker News Logo
Subscribe – Get Latest News
Cloud Security

South Korea | Breaking Cybersecurity News | The Hacker News

Duuzer Trojan: A New Backdoor Targeting South Korean Organizations

Duuzer Trojan: A New Backdoor Targeting South Korean Organizations

Oct 27, 2015
Security researchers at Symantec have uncovered a new Backdoor Trojan that grants hackers remote access and some control over infected machines. " Duuzer ," as dubbed by the researchers, has been targeting organizations in South Korea and elsewhere in an attempt to steal valuable information. The Trojan is designed to infect both 32-bit and 64-bit computers running Windows 7, Windows Vista, and Windows XP. Duuzer gives attackers remote access to the compromised computer, allowing them to: Collect system and drive information Create, enumerate, and end processes Access, modify and delete files Upload and Download additional files Change the time attributes of files Execute malicious commands Steal data from infected system Know about victim's Operating System Duuzer Infects via Spear Phishing or Watering Hole Attacks It is currently unclear how the malware is being distributed, but according to Symantec Researchers, the most obvious routes ar
South Korean Nuclear Power Plant Hacked

South Korean Nuclear Power Plant Hacked

Dec 24, 2014
Koreans have once again gain media attention but this time not as an accused of any kind of hack attack, but as a victim of a severe attack on computers systems at a nuclear power plant in South Korea by an unknown hacker or a group. South Korea was hit by a cyber attack on its nuclear power plant, causing the operator to conduct drills in order to test the ability of the nuclear plant to cope with a full-scale cyber-attack. Although the plant's operator says no critical data has been leaked. The cyber attack came into light after a hacker posted blueprints of nuclear reactors online and threatened further "leaks" unless authorities close down the reactors. According to the South Korean Yonhap News Agency, the hacker was able to access blueprints of reactors, floor maps and other internal information on the plant. Last week with the help of a Twitter account named " president of anti-nuclear reactor group ," the hacker posted leaked data revea
AI Copilot: Launching Innovation Rockets, But Beware of the Darkness Ahead

AI Copilot: Launching Innovation Rockets, But Beware of the Darkness Ahead

Apr 15, 2024Secure Coding / Artificial Intelligence
Imagine a world where the software that powers your favorite apps, secures your online transactions, and keeps your digital life could be outsmarted and taken over by a cleverly disguised piece of code. This isn't a plot from the latest cyber-thriller; it's actually been a reality for years now. How this will change – in a positive or negative direction – as artificial intelligence (AI) takes on a larger role in software development is one of the big uncertainties related to this brave new world. In an era where AI promises to revolutionize how we live and work, the conversation about its security implications cannot be sidelined. As we increasingly rely on AI for tasks ranging from mundane to mission-critical, the question is no longer just, "Can AI  boost cybersecurity ?" (sure!), but also "Can AI  be hacked? " (yes!), "Can one use AI  to hack? " (of course!), and "Will AI  produce secure software ?" (well…). This thought leadership article is about the latter. Cydrill  (a
70% of South Korean Population Victimized In Online Gaming Heist

70% of South Korean Population Victimized In Online Gaming Heist

Aug 27, 2014
More than half of South Korea's 50 million population aged between 15 and 65 have been affected in a massive data breach, compromising their personal information. The data breach came to light when 16 individual were arrested following the theft of about 220 million stolen records from a number of online game, ringtone storefronts and movie ticket sites that contains personally identifiable information related to 27 million victims. The stolen records included actual name, account name, password and resident registration number of the victims, According to the English version of a Seoul-based daily newspaper, the Korea Joongang Daily . Among 16 perpetrators, the South Jeolla Provincial Police Agency arrested a 24-year-old man named 'Kim' , for allegedly obtaining and selling all 220 million personal information including names, registration numbers, account names, and passwords , from a Chinese hacker he met through an online game in 2011. Police estimated the
cyber security

Today's Top 4 Identity Threat Exposures: Where To Find Them and How To Stop Them

websiteSilverfortIdentity Protection / Attack Surface
Explore the first ever threat report 100% focused on the prevalence of identity security gaps you may not be aware of.
25 Million 'NAVER' Accounts Breached using Stolen Data

25 Million 'NAVER' Accounts Breached using Stolen Data

Mar 27, 2014
A 31-year-old South Korean has been recently accused by the police for the allegation of infiltrating and hacking the accounts of 25 million users of   Naver , one of the popular search portal in South Korea. On Wednesday, the Asian National Police Agency revealed that the suspect purchased the private information of 25 million users, including names, residential numbers, Internet IDs and passwords from a Korean-Chinese, back in August last year, Korea Herald reported. The suspect surnamed  ' Seo ', supposedly used the purchased information to hack into the accounts of Naver users and sent out spam messages and other ' illicit emails ' to the account holders. He had made an illegal profit of some 160 million won ( $148,000 ) using this, according to the report. Also a hacker surnamed  ' Hong ', has been arrested by the police who was suspected to develop the hacking program that automatically enter users' IDs and passwords, which was apparently used by
20 Million Credit Cards stolen in South Korea; 40% Population affected by the Data Leak

20 Million Credit Cards stolen in South Korea; 40% Population affected by the Data Leak

Jan 20, 2014
Since all threats to data security and privacy often come from outside, but internal threats are comparatively more dangerous and a difficult new dimension to the data loss prevention challenge i.e. Data Breach . The " Insider threats " have the potential to cause greater financial losses than attacks that originate outside the company. This is what happened recently with three credit card firms in South Korea , where the financial and personal data belonging to users of at least 20 million, in a country of 50 million, was stolen by an employee, who worked as a temporary consultant at Korean Credit Bureau (KCB). " Confidential data of customers ranging from the minister-level officials to celebrities, including their phone numbers, addresses, credit card numbers, and even some banking records, have been leaked from Kookmin Bank, Shinhan Bank and several other commercial banks ", The stolen data includes the bank account numbers, customers' names, social security number
Rogue software update cause Malware attack on Japanese Nuclear Power Plant

Rogue software update cause Malware attack on Japanese Nuclear Power Plant

Jan 10, 2014
The most critical and worst target of a State-sponsored cyber-attack s could be Hospitals, Dams, Dykes and Nuclear power stations and this may cause military conflicts between countries. According to Japan Today , The Monju nuclear power plant in Tsuruga, Japan was accidentally targeted by a malware on 2nd January, when a worker updated the system to the latest version of the video playback program. Monju Nuclear Plant  is a sodium-cooled fast reactor, was launched in April 1994. It has not been operational for most of the past 20 years, after an accident in which a sodium leak caused a major fire. Employees over there are only left with a regular job of company's paperwork and maintenance. So the malware could have stolen only some sensitive documents, emails, training records and employees' data sheets. The Malware command-and-control server suspected to be from South Korea. The malware itself is not much sophisticated like Stuxnet  or Duqu, but the unmanaged software u
South Korea hit by Android Trojan, Malware in Gaming apps and DDoS attack

South Korea hit by Android Trojan, Malware in Gaming apps and DDoS attack

Oct 25, 2013
Last Tuesday, The National Police Agency of South Korea warned the people that many Malware infected video games being offered in the South Korean markets with the purpose of launching Cyber attacks on the Country. That Malware is collecting location data and IP addresses of infected users and according to experts, malware is sending data back to its master servers based in North Korea . Just today the Korea's largest anti-virus software firm AhnLab  confirmed that they have detected distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks on local companies' websites. According to the report, about 16 websites of 13 companies, including Daum, MSN and the JoongAng Ilbo newspaper had been affected. AhnLab said that some 10-thousand computers have been hit, mainly because they failed to install a vaccination program or update an existing one since the last cyber attack in July. The attack was detected around 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, infecting around 10,000 computer
South Korea defense bans Smartphones for data security

South Korea defense bans Smartphones for data security

Jul 04, 2013
South Korea 's Ministry of National Defense is banning its employees from using the  smart phones inside of the ministry's building in a bid to prevent military data leaks. At present, the only way to ensure sensitive corporate and Defense data is not lost is to provide employees with devices owned and controlled by the enterprise. Staffers will still be allowed to make phone calls or use text messaging services and also visitors will also be required to leave their smartphones at the entrance, officials said Wednesday. Defense ministry employees will be required to install a smart phone application which deactivates major smart phone functions like computing, Internet connectivity and the camera. Employees will be allowed to answer and make phone calls and use text messaging services and the plan will kick in on July 15.
Cybersecurity Resources