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Chrome, Firefox, Edge and Safari Plans to Disable TLS 1.0 and 1.1 in 2020

Chrome, Firefox, Edge and Safari Plans to Disable TLS 1.0 and 1.1 in 2020

October 15, 2018Swati Khandelwal
All major web browsers, including Google Chrome, Apple Safari, Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, and Mozilla Firefox, altogether today announced to soon remove support for TLS 1.0 (20-year-old) and TLS 1.1 (12-year-old) communication encryption protocols. Developed initially as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol, Transport Layer Security (TLS) is an updated cryptographic protocol used to establish a secure and encrypted communications channel between clients and servers. There are currently four versions of the TLS protocol—TLS 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3 ( latest )—but older versions, TLS 1.0 and 1.1, are known to be vulnerable to a number of critical attacks, such as  POODLE  and  BEAST . Since TLS implementation in all major web browsers and applications supports downgrade negotiation process, it leaves an opportunity for attackers to exploit weaker protocols even if a server supports the latest version. All Major Web Browsers Will Remove TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1 Support in 2020
From today, Google Chrome starts marking all non-HTTPS sites 'Not Secure'

From today, Google Chrome starts marking all non-HTTPS sites 'Not Secure'

July 24, 2018Mohit Kumar
Starting today with the release of Chrome 68, Google Chrome prominently marks all non-HTTPS websites as 'Not Secure' in its years-long effort to make the web a more secure place for Internet users. So if you are still running an insecure HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) website, many of your visitors might already be greeted with a 'Not Secure' message on their Google Chrome browser warning them that they can't trust your website to be secure. By displaying ' Not Secure ,' Google Chrome means that your connection is not secure because there is no SSL Certificate to encrypt your connection between your computer and the website's server. So, anything sent over a non-HTTPS connection is in plain text, like your password or payment card information, allowing attackers to snoop or tamper with your data. The non-https connection has been considered dangerous particularly for web pages that transfer sensitive information—like login pages and payment
Google Chrome Bans Chinese SSL Certificate Authorities WoSign and StartCom

Google Chrome Bans Chinese SSL Certificate Authorities WoSign and StartCom

July 08, 2017Mohit Kumar
As a punishment announced last October, Google will no longer trust SSL/TLS certificate authorities WoSign and its subsidiary StartCom with the launch of Chrome 61 for not maintaining the "high standards expected of CAs." The move came after Google was notified by GitHub's security team on August 17, 2016, that Chinese Certificate Authority WoSign had issued a base certificate for one of GitHub's domains to an unnamed GitHub user without authorization. After this issue had been reported, Google conducted an investigation in public as a collaboration with Mozilla and the security community, which uncovered several other cases of WoSign misissuance of certificates. As a result, the tech giant last year began limiting its trust of certificates backed by WoSign and StartCom to those issued before October 21st, 2016 and has been removing whitelisted hostnames over the course of several Chrome releases since Chrome 56. Now, in a Google Groups post published
Symantec API Flaws reportedly let attackers steal Private SSL Keys and Certificates

Symantec API Flaws reportedly let attackers steal Private SSL Keys and Certificates

March 28, 2017Swati Khandelwal
A security researcher has disclosed critical issues in the processes and third-party API used by Symantec certificate resellers to deliver and manage Symantec SSL certificates. The flaw, discovered by Chris Byrne, an information security consultant and instructor for Cloud Harmonics, could allow an unauthenticated attacker to retrieve other persons' SSL certificates, including public and private keys, as well as to reissue or revoke those certificates. Even without revoking and reissuing a certificate, attackers can conduct "man-in-the-middle" attack over the secure connections using stolen SSL certs, tricking users into believing they are on a legitimate site when in fact their SSL traffic is being secretly tampered with and intercepted. "All you had to do was click a link sent in [an] email, and you could retrieve a cert, revoke a cert, and re-issue a cert," Byrne wrote in a Facebook post published over the weekend. Symantec knew of API Flaws Si
Google Chrome to Distrust Symantec SSLs for Mis-issuing 30,000 EV Certificates

Google Chrome to Distrust Symantec SSLs for Mis-issuing 30,000 EV Certificates

March 24, 2017Swati Khandelwal
Google announced its plans to punish Symantec by gradually distrusting its SSL certificates after the company was caught improperly issuing 30,000 Extended Validation (EV) certificates over the past few years. The Extended Validation (EV) status of all certificates issued by Symantec-owned certificate authorities will no longer be recognized by the Chrome browser for at least a year until Symantec fixes its certificate issuance processes so that it can be trusted again. Extended validation certificates are supposed to provide the highest level of trust and authentication, where before issuing a certificate, Certificate Authority must verify the requesting entity's legal existence and identity. The move came into effect immediately after Ryan Sleevi, a software engineer on the Google Chrome team, made this announcement on Thursday in an online forum . "This is also coupled with a series of failures following the previous set of misissued certificates from Symantec, c
Google becomes its own Root Certificate Authority

Google becomes its own Root Certificate Authority

January 28, 2017Swati Khandelwal
In an effort to expand its certificate authority capabilities and build the "foundation of a more secure web," Google has finally launched its root certificate authority. In past few years, we have seen Google taking many steps to show its strong support for sites using HTTPS, like: Giving more preference to HTTPS websites in its search rankings than others. Warning users that all HTTP pages are not secure. Starting an industry-wide initiative, Certificate Transparency − an open framework to log, audit, and monitor certificates that CAs have issued. However, Google has been relying on an intermediate Certificate Authority (Google Internet Authority G2 - GIAG2) issued by a third party, with the latest suppliers being GlobalSign and GeoTrust, which manages and deploys certificates to Google's products and services. Google announced Thursday the creation of its own certified, and independent Root Certificate Authority called Google Trust Services , allowing
OpenSSL Releases Patch For "High" Severity Vulnerability

OpenSSL Releases Patch For "High" Severity Vulnerability

November 10, 2016Mohit Kumar
As announced on Tuesday, the OpenSSL project team released OpenSSL version 1.1.0c that addresses three security vulnerabilities in its software. The most serious of all is a heap-based buffer overflow bug (CVE-2016-7054) related to Transport Layer Security (TLS) connections using *-CHACHA20-POLY1305 cipher suites. The vulnerability, reported by Robert Święcki of the Google Security Team on September 25, can lead to DoS attack by corrupting larger payloads, resulting in a crash of OpenSSL. The severity of the flaw is rated "High" and does not affect OpenSSL versions prior to 1.1.0. However, the OpenSSL team reports there is no evidence that the flaw is exploitable beyond a DoS attack. The OpenSSL project also patches a moderate severity flaw (CVE-2016-7053) that can cause applications to crash. "Applications parsing invalid CMS structures can crash with a NULL pointer dereference. This is caused by a bug in the handling of the ASN.1 CHOICE type in OpenSSL 1.1.0
Critical DoS Flaw found in OpenSSL — How It Works

Critical DoS Flaw found in OpenSSL — How It Works

September 23, 2016Swati Khandelwal
The OpenSSL Foundation has patched over a dozen vulnerabilities in its cryptographic code library, including a high severity bug that can be exploited for denial-of-service (DoS) attacks. OpenSSL is a widely used open-source cryptographic library that provides encrypted Internet connections using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or Transport Layer Security (TLS) for the majority of websites, as well as other secure services. The vulnerabilities exist in OpenSSL versions 1.0.1, 1.0.2 and 1.1.0 and patched in OpenSSL versions 1.1.0a, 1.0.2i and 1.0.1u. The Critical-rated bug ( CVE-2016-6304 ) can be exploited by sending a large OCSP Status Request extension on the targeted server during connection negotiations, which causes memory exhaustion to launch DoS attacks, the OpenSSL Project said . What is OCSP Protocol? OCSP (Online Certificate Status Protocol), supported by all modern web browsers, is a protocol designed to perform verification and obtain the revocation status of a digital
Chinese Certificate Authority 'mistakenly' gave out SSL Certs for GitHub Domains

Chinese Certificate Authority 'mistakenly' gave out SSL Certs for GitHub Domains

August 29, 2016Swati Khandelwal
A Chinese certificate authority (CA) appeared to be making a significant security blunder by handing out duplicate SSL certificates for a base domain if someone just has control over its any subdomain. The certificate authority, named WoSign , issued a base certificate for the Github domains to an unnamed GitHub user. But How? First of all, do you know, the traditional Digital Certificate Management System is the weakest link on the Internet today and has already been broken? Billions of Internet users blindly rely on hundreds of Certificate Authorities (CA) around the globe to ensure the confidentiality and integrity of their personal data. But, these CAs have powers to issue valid SSL cert for any domain you own, despite the fact you already have one purchased from another CA. ...and that's the biggest loophole in the CA system. In the latest case as well, WoSign issued a duplicate SSL certificate for GitHub domains without verifying ownership of the base domain.
'Ridiculous' Bug in Popular Antivirus Allows Hackers to Steal all Your Passwords

'Ridiculous' Bug in Popular Antivirus Allows Hackers to Steal all Your Passwords

January 12, 2016Mohit Kumar
If you have installed Trend Micro's Antivirus on your Windows computer, then Beware. Your computer can be remotely hijacked, or infected with any malware by even through a website – Thanks to a critical vulnerability in Trend Micro Security Software. The Popular antivirus maker and security firm Trend Micro has released an emergency patch to fix critical flaws in its anti-virus product that allow hackers to execute arbitrary commands remotely as well as steal your saved password from Password Manager built into its AntiVirus program. The password management tool that comes bundled with its main antivirus is used to store passwords by users and works exactly like any other password manager application. Even Websites Can Hack Into Your Computer Google's Project Zero security researcher, Tavis Ormandy, discovered the remote code execution flaw in Trend Micro Antivirus Password Manager component, allowing hackers to steal users’ passwords. In short, o
Hackers Install Free SSL Certs from Let's Encrypt On Malicious Web Sites

Hackers Install Free SSL Certs from Let's Encrypt On Malicious Web Sites

January 07, 2016Swati Khandelwal
Who else didn't see this coming? It was so obvious as I stressed earlier that the  Let's Encrypt free HTTPS certificates would not just help legitimate website operators to encrypt its users' traffic, but also help criminals to bother innocent users with malware through secure sites. Let's Encrypt allows anyone to obtain free SSL/TLS ( Secure Socket Layer/Transport Layer Security ) certificates for their web servers that encrypt all the Internet traffic passed between a server and users. Let's Encrypt is recognized by all major browsers, including Google's Chrome, Mozilla's Firefox and Microsoft's Internet Explorer. The organization started offering Free HTTPS certs to everyone from last month, and it is very easy for anyone to set up an HTTPS website in a few simple steps ( How to Install Free SSL Cert ). However, the most bothersome part is that Let's Encrypt free SSL certs are not only used by website owners to secure its
Kazakhstan makes it Mandatory for its Citizens to Install Internet Backdoor

Kazakhstan makes it Mandatory for its Citizens to Install Internet Backdoor

December 04, 2015Mohit Kumar
Next in the queue, Kazakhstan is also planning to Spy on encrypted Internet Traffic of its citizens, but in the most shameless way. Unlike other spying nations that are themselves capable of spying on their citizens, Kazakhstan will force every internet user in the country to install bogus security certs on their PCs and mobile devices, allowing the 'Dictator' Government to: Intercept users' Internet traffic to any Secure website, i.e. Man-in-the-Middle  Attack Access everything from user's web browsing history to usernames and passwords to secure and HTTPS-encrypted traffic This Program will seriously restrict Citizens' Freedom of Speech and Expression. What the F… is "National Internet Security Certificate"? On Monday, the nation's largest Internet service provider Kazakhtelecom JSC published a notice, which said: Citizens are "obliged" to install a so-called " National Internet Security Certificate "
Millions of IoT Devices Using Same Hard-Coded CRYPTO Keys

Millions of IoT Devices Using Same Hard-Coded CRYPTO Keys

November 27, 2015Swati Khandelwal
Millions of embedded devices, including home routers, modems, IP cameras, VoIP phones, are shareing the same hard-coded SSH (Secure Shell) cryptographic keys or HTTPS (HTTP Secure) server certificates that expose them to various types of malicious attacks. A new analysis by IT security consultancy SEC Consult shows that the lazy manufacturers of the Internet of Things (IoTs) and Home Routers are reusing the same set of hard-coded cryptographic keys, leaving devices open to Hijacking. In simple words, this means that if you are able to access one device remotely, you can possibly log into hundreds of thousands of other devices – including the devices from different manufacturers. Re-Using Same Encryption Keys In its survey of IoT devices , the company studied 4,000 embedded devices from 70 different hardware vendors, ranging from simple home routers to Internet gateway servers, and discovered that… …over 580 unique private cryptographic keys for SSH and HTTPS a
Dell's Laptops are Infected with 'Superfish-Like' pre-installed Malware

Dell's Laptops are Infected with 'Superfish-Like' pre-installed Malware

November 24, 2015Swati Khandelwal
Similar to the Superfish malware that surrounded Lenovo laptops in February, another big computer manufacturer Dell spotted selling PCs and laptops pre-installed with a rogue SSL certificate that could allow attackers: To impersonate as any HTTPS-protected website and spy on when banking or shopping online. The rogue certificate, dubbed eDellRoot , was first discovered over the weekend by a software programmer named Joe Nord . The certificate is so creepy that it automatically re-installs itself even when removed from the Windows operating system. Also Read:  Lenovo Caught Using Rootkit to Secretly Install Unremovable Software Superfish 2.0: Unkillable Zombie The self-signed transport layer security (TLS) credential came pre-installed as a root certificate on Dell PCs and laptops that are signed with the same private cryptographic key, which is stored locally. That means an attacker with moderate technical skills can extract the key and abuse it to sign fo
Free Encryption Project to issue First SSL/TLS Certificates Next Month

Free Encryption Project to issue First SSL/TLS Certificates Next Month

June 19, 2015Swati Khandelwal
Let's Encrypt , a project aimed to provide free-of-charge and easier-to-implement way to obtain and use a digital cryptographic certificates (SSL/TLS) to secure HTTPS website, is looking forward to issue its first digital certificates next month. With Let's Encrypt , any webmaster interested in implementing HTTPS for their services can get the certificates for free, which is a great move for encouraging people to encrypt their users’ connections to their websites. Let's Encrypt is a combined effort of digital-era rights advocate Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Mozilla Foundation , Cisco Systems , Internet content distributor Akamai Technologies , certificate provider IdenTrust and researchers from the University of Michigan . Generally, the process of implementation of an SSL certificate, including the need to obtain and install a certificate, is complicated for most web developers as it sounds. In most cases, the cost related issues force web adm
Critical SSL Vulnerability Leaves 25,000 iOS Apps Vulnerable to Hackers

Critical SSL Vulnerability Leaves 25,000 iOS Apps Vulnerable to Hackers

April 25, 2015Mohit Kumar
A critical vulnerability resides in AFNetworking could allow an attacker to cripple the HTTPS protection of 25,000 iOS apps available in Apple's App Store via man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks . AFNetworking is a popular open-source code library that lets developers drop networking capabilities into their iOS and OS X products. But, it fails to check the domain name for which the SSL certificate has been issued. Any Apple iOS application that uses AFNetworking version prior to the latest version 2.5.3 may be vulnerable to the flaw that could allow hackers to steal or tamper data, even if the app protected by the SSL (secure sockets layer) protocol . Use any SSL Certificate to decrypt users' sensitive data: An attacker could use any valid SSL certificate for any domain name in order to exploit the vulnerability, as long as the certificate issued by a trusted certificate authority (CA) that’s something you can buy for $50. " This meant that a coffee sh
iOS 8 Vulnerability Lets Hackers Crash Any iPhone and iPad Within Wi-Fi Range

iOS 8 Vulnerability Lets Hackers Crash Any iPhone and iPad Within Wi-Fi Range

April 22, 2015Swati Khandelwal
Security researchers have uncovered a zero-day vulnerability in iOS 8 that could repeatedly crash users' Apple iPhones, iPads and iPods when the devices connect to a malicious wireless hotspot. It’s like Denial of Service (DoS) attack on Apple's iOS devices that results in crashing either individual iOS apps or users' entire iPhones. NO iOS ZONE Adi Sharabani and Yair Amit of Mobile security firm Skycure presented their latest research, titled " No iOS Zone ", at the RSA security conference in San Francisco on Tuesday. The duo showed: It is possible for an attacker to create malicious Wi-Fi networks in order to crash nearby users’ mobile devices with incredible accuracy. Also, even the "No iOS Zone" attack is capable to make iOS things within the range completely unusable by triggering constant numbers of reboots. It is nothing but a DoS attack… ...that makes the device inaccessible by its users, just like in the ca
Gogo In-flight Internet issues Fake SSL Certificates to its own Customers

Gogo In-flight Internet issues Fake SSL Certificates to its own Customers

January 06, 2015Swati Khandelwal
Gogo — one of the largest providers of in-flight Internet service — has been caught issuing fake SSL certificates, allowing the inflight broadband provider to launch man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks on its own users, view passwords and other sensitive information. The news came to light when security engineer Adrienne Porter Felt , who works on Google Chrome’s security team, was served the phony SSL certificate while trying to connect to Google's video service YouTube. She noticed that the SSL certificate was signed by an untrusted issuer and wasn’t issued by Google, but rather by Gogo itself. Felt publicly posted details about the spoofed certificate on Twitter and also provided a screenshot of the HTTPS certificate Gogo issued her when she visited YouTube. Felt tweeted , “ Hey, @Gogo, why are you issuing *.google.com certificates on your planes? ” Alike other unauthorized certificates, the fake Gogo certificate would generate warnings by virtually all modern bro
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