The Hacker News Logo
Subscribe to Newsletter

The Hacker News - Cybersecurity News and Analysis: windows security

Warning — Unpatched Critical 'Wormable' Windows SMBv3 Flaw Disclosed

Warning — Unpatched Critical 'Wormable' Windows SMBv3 Flaw Disclosed

March 11, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
Shortly after releasing its monthly batch of security updates , Microsoft late yesterday separately issued an advisory warning billions of its Windows users of a new critical, unpatched, and wormable vulnerability affecting Server Message Block 3.0 ( SMBv3 ) network communication protocol. It appears Microsoft originally planned to fix the flaw as part of its March 2020 Patch Tuesday update only, but, for some reason, it pulled the plug at the last minute, which apparently did not stop a tech company from accidentally leaking the existence of the unpatched flaw. The yet-to-be patched flaw (tracked as CVE-2020-0796 ), if exploited successfully, could allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code on the target SMB Server or SMB Client. The belated acknowledgment from Microsoft led some researchers to call the bug " SMBGhost ." "To exploit the vulnerability against an SMB Server, an unauthenticated attacker could send a specially crafted packet to a targeted SMBv3
Update Windows 10 Immediately to Patch a Flaw Discovered by the NSA

Update Windows 10 Immediately to Patch a Flaw Discovered by the NSA

January 14, 2020Mohit Kumar
After Adobe today releases its first Patch Tuesday updates for 2020, Microsoft has now also published its January security advisories warning billions of users of 49 new vulnerabilities in its various products. What's so special about the latest Patch Tuesday is that one of the updates fixes a serious flaw in the core cryptographic component of widely used Windows 10, Server 2016 and 2019 editions that was discovered and reported to the company by the National Security Agency (NSA) of the United States. What's more interesting is that this is the first security flaw in Windows OS that the NSA reported responsibly to Microsoft, unlike the  Eternalblue SMB flaw that the agency kept secret for at least five years and then was leaked to the public by a mysterious group, which caused WannaCry menace in 2017. CVE-2020-0601: Windows CryptoAPI Spoofing Vulnerability According to an advisory released by Microsoft, the flaw, dubbed ' NSACrypt ' and tracked as CVE-20
Are You Ready for Microsoft Windows 7 End of Support on 14th January 2020?

Are You Ready for Microsoft Windows 7 End of Support on 14th January 2020?

January 07, 2020The Hacker News
January 14, 2020, is a day cybersecurity stakeholders should pay attention to, as it marks the end of Microsoft support in Windows 7. From a security perspective, both the routine monthly security patches as well as hotfixes for attacks in the wild will not be available, effectively making any newly discovered vulnerability a Windows 7 zero-day. Cynet 360 autonomous breach protection is a good example of a multilayered advanced protection solution that can enable organizations who run Windows 7 to remain secure despite the end of support ( to learn more click here ). Let's dig a bit deeper to understand the risk. The reality is that all software contains bugs. Ideally, these bugs are discovered during the development process. In practice, many of them surface only following the product release in the course of their interactions with real users. Bugs that can be exploited for malicious purposes are called vulnerabilities. Microsoft conducts rigorous and ongoing research
New Chrome 0-day Bug Under Active Attacks – Update Your Browser Now!

New Chrome 0-day Bug Under Active Attacks – Update Your Browser Now!

November 01, 2019Swati Khandelwal
Attention readers, if you are using Chrome on your Windows, Mac, and Linux computers, you need to update your web browsing software immediately to the latest version Google released earlier today. With the release of Chrome 78.0.3904.87, Google is warning billions of users to install an urgent software update immediately to patch two high severity vulnerabilities, one of which attackers are actively exploiting in the wild to hijack computers. Without revealing technical details of the vulnerability, the Chrome security team only says that both issues are use-after-free vulnerabilities, one affecting Chrome's audio component ( CVE-2019-13720 ) while the other resides in the PDFium ( CVE-2019-13721 ) library. The use-after-free vulnerability is a class of memory corruption issues that allows corruption or modification of data in the memory, enabling an unprivileged user to escalate privileges on an affected system or software. Thus, both flaws could enable remote attackers
Patches for 2 Severe LibreOffice Flaws Bypassed — Update to Patch Again

Patches for 2 Severe LibreOffice Flaws Bypassed — Update to Patch Again

August 16, 2019Swati Khandelwal
If you are using LibreOffice, you need to update it once again. LibreOffice has released the latest version 6.2.6/6.3.0 of its open-source office software to address three new vulnerabilities that could allow attackers to bypass patches for two previously addressed vulnerabilities. LibreOffice is one of the most popular and open source alternatives to Microsoft Office suite and is available for Windows, Linux and macOS systems. One of the two vulnerabilities, tracked as CVE-2019-9848 , that LibreOffice attempted to patch just last month was a code execution flaw that affected LibreLogo, a programmable turtle vector graphics script that ships by default with LibreOffice. This flaw allows an attacker to craft a malicious document that can silently execute arbitrary python commands without displaying any warning to a targeted user. Apparently, the patch for this vulnerability was insufficient, as The Hacker News also reported late last month , which allowed two separate secu
New Brute-Force Botnet Targeting Over 1.5 Million RDP Servers Worldwide

New Brute-Force Botnet Targeting Over 1.5 Million RDP Servers Worldwide

June 07, 2019Swati Khandelwal
Security researchers have discovered an ongoing sophisticated botnet campaign that is currently brute-forcing more than 1.5 million publicly accessible Windows RDP servers on the Internet. Dubbed GoldBrute , the botnet scheme has been designed in a way to escalate gradually by adding every new cracked system to its network, forcing them to further find new available RDP servers and then brute force them. To fly under the radar of security tools and malware analysts, attackers behind this campaign command each infected machine to target millions of servers with a unique set of username and password combination so that a targeted server receives brute force attempts from different IP addresses. The campaign, discovered  by Renato Marinho at Morphus Labs, works as shown in the illustrated image, and its modus operandi has been explained in the following steps: Step 1 — After successfully brute-forcing an RDP server, the attacker installs a JAVA-based GoldBrute botnet malware
Update: Hacker Disclosed 4 New Microsoft Zero-Day Exploits in Last 24 Hours

Update: Hacker Disclosed 4 New Microsoft Zero-Day Exploits in Last 24 Hours

May 22, 2019Mohit Kumar
Less than 24 hours after publicly disclosing an unpatched zero-day vulnerability in Windows 10 , the anonymous hacker going by online alias "SandboxEscaper" has now dropped new exploits for two more unpatched Microsoft zero-day vulnerabilities. The two new zero-day vulnerabilities affect Microsoft's Windows Error Reporting service and Internet Explorer 11. Just yesterday, while releasing a Windows 10 zero-day exploit for a local privilege escalation bug in Task Scheduler utility, SandboxEscaper claimed to have discovered four more zero-day bugs, exploits for two has now been publicly released. AngryPolarBearBug2 Windows Bug One of the latest Microsoft zero-day vulnerabilities resides in the Windows Error Reporting service that can be exploited using a discretionary access control list (DACL) operation—a mechanism that identifies users and groups that are assigned or denied access permissions to a securable object. Upon successful exploitation, an attacker can del
PoC Exploit For Unpatched Windows 10 Zero-Day Flaw Published Online

PoC Exploit For Unpatched Windows 10 Zero-Day Flaw Published Online

May 21, 2019Mohit Kumar
An anonymous hacker with an online alias "SandboxEscaper" today released proof-of-concept (PoC) exploit code for a new zero-day vulnerability affecting Windows 10 operating system—that's his/her 5th publicly disclosed Windows zero-day exploit [ 1 , 2 , 3 ] in less than a year. Published on GitHub , the new Windows 10 zero-day vulnerability is a privilege escalation issue that could allow a local attacker or malware to gain and run code with administrative system privileges on the targeted machines, eventually allowing the attacker to gain full control of the machine. The vulnerability resides in Task Scheduler, a utility that enables Windows users to schedule the launch of programs or scripts at a predefined time or after specified time intervals. SandboxEscaper's exploit code makes use of SchRpcRegisterTask, a method in Task Scheduler to register tasks with the server, which doesn't properly check for permissions and can, therefore, be used to set an arb
Microsoft Releases Patches For A Critical 'Wormable Flaw' and 78 Other Issues

Microsoft Releases Patches For A Critical 'Wormable Flaw' and 78 Other Issues

May 14, 2019Mohit Kumar
It's Patch Tuesday—the day when Microsoft releases monthly security updates for its software. Microsoft has software updates to address a total of 79 CVE-listed vulnerabilities in its Windows operating systems and other products, including a critical wormable flaw that can propagate malware from computer to computer without requiring users' interaction. Out of 79 vulnerabilities, 18 issues have been rated as critical and rest Important in severity. Two of the vulnerabilities addressed this month by the tech giant are listed as publicly known, of which one is listed as under active attack at the time of release. May 2019 security updates address flaws in Windows OS, Internet Explorer, Edge, Microsoft Office, and Microsoft Office Services and Web Apps, ChakraCore, .NET Framework, and ASP.NET, Skype for Android, Azure DevOps Server, and the NuGet Package Manager. Critical Wormable RDP Vulnerability The wormable vulnerability ( CVE-2019-0708 ) resides in Remote Desktop
Researcher Hijacks a Microsoft Service Using Loophole in Azure Cloud Platform

Researcher Hijacks a Microsoft Service Using Loophole in Azure Cloud Platform

April 17, 2019Mohit Kumar
A cybersecurity professional today demonstrated a long-known unpatched weakness in Microsoft's Azure cloud service by exploiting it to take control over Windows Live Tiles , one of the key features Microsoft built into Windows 8 operating system. Introduced in Windows 8, the Live tiles feature was designed to display content and notifications on the Start screen, allowing users to continuously pull up-to-date information from their favorite apps and websites. To make it easier for websites to offer their content as Live Tiles, Microsoft had a feature available on a subdomain of a separate domain, i.e., " notifications.buildmypinnedsite.com ," that allowed website admins to automatically convert their RSS feeds into a special XML format and use it as a meta tag on their websites. The service, which Microsoft had already shut down, was hosted on its own Azure Cloud platform with the subdomain configured/linked to an Azure account operated by the company. However,
Microsoft Announces Windows Defender ATP Antivirus for Mac

Microsoft Announces Windows Defender ATP Antivirus for Mac

March 22, 2019Mohit Kumar
Brace yourself guys. Microsoft is going to release its Windows Defender ATP antivirus software for Mac computers. Sounds crazy, right? But it's true. Microsoft Thursday announced that the company is bringing its anti-malware software to Apple's macOS operating system as well—and to more platforms soon, like Linux. As a result, the technology giant renamed its Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) to Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) in an attempt to minimize name-confusion and reflect the cross-platform nature of the software suite. But wait, does your Macbook need antivirus protection? Of course! For all those wondering if Mac even gets viruses—macOS is generally more secure than Windows, but in recent years cybercriminals have started paying attention to the Mac platform, making it a new target for viruses, Trojans, spyware, adware, ransomware, backdoors, and other nefarious applications. Moreover, hackers have been successful many ti
Unpatched vCard Flaw Could Let Attackers Hack Your Windows PCs

Unpatched vCard Flaw Could Let Attackers Hack Your Windows PCs

January 15, 2019Wang Wei
A zero-day vulnerability has been discovered and reported in the Microsoft's Windows operating system that, under a certain scenario, could allow a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code on Windows machine. Discovered by security researcher John Page (@hyp3rlinx), the vulnerability was reported to the Microsoft security team through Trend Micro's Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) Program over 6 months ago, which the tech giant has refused to patch, at least for now. The vulnerability, which has not been assigned any CVE number, actually resides within the processing of a vCard file—a standard file format for storing contact information for a person or business, which is also supported by Microsoft Outlook. According to the researcher, a remote attacker can maliciously craft a VCard file in a way that the contact's website URL stored within the file points to a local executable file, which can be sent within a zipped file via an email or delivered separately via drive-b
Microsoft Patch Tuesday — January 2019 Security Updates Released

Microsoft Patch Tuesday — January 2019 Security Updates Released

January 08, 2019Swati Khandelwal
Microsoft has issued its first Patch Tuesday for this year to address 49 CVE-listed security vulnerabilities in its Windows operating systems and other products, 7 of which are rated critical, 40 important and 2 moderate in severity. Just one of the security vulnerabilities patched by the tech giant this month has been reported as being publicly known at the time of release, and none are being actively exploited in the wild. All the seven critical-rated vulnerabilities lead to remote code execution and primarily impact various versions of Windows 10 and Server editions. Two of the 7 critical flaws affect Microsoft's Hyper-V host OS that fails to properly validate input from an authenticated user on a guest operating system, three affect the ChakraCore scripting engine that fails to properly handle objects in memory in Edge, one affects Edge directly that occurs when the browser improperly handles objects in memory, and one impacts the Windows DHCP client that fails to pro
Microsoft Releases Patches for 60 Flaws—Two Under Active Attack

Microsoft Releases Patches for 60 Flaws—Two Under Active Attack

August 14, 2018Mohit Kumar
Get your update caps on. Just a few minutes ago Microsoft released its latest monthly Patch Tuesday update for August 2018, patching a total of 60 vulnerabilities, of which 19 are rated as critical. The updates patch flaws in Microsoft Windows, Edge Browser, Internet Explorer, Office, ChakraCore, .NET Framework, Exchange Server, Microsoft SQL Server and Visual Studio. Two of these vulnerabilities patched by the tech giant is listed as publicly known and being exploited in the wild at the time of release. According to the advisory released by Microsoft, all 19 critical-rated vulnerabilities lead to remote code execution (RCE), some of which could eventually allow attackers to take control of the affected system if exploited successfully. Besides this, Microsoft has also addressed 39 important flaws, one moderate and one low in severity. Here below we have listed brief details of a few critical and publically exploited important vulnerabilities: Internet Explorer Memory Co
Microsoft June 2018 Patch Tuesday Pushes 11 Critical Security Updates

Microsoft June 2018 Patch Tuesday Pushes 11 Critical Security Updates

June 12, 2018Mohit Kumar
It's time to gear up for the latest June 2018 Microsoft security patch updates. Microsoft today released security patch updates for more than 50 vulnerabilities, affecting Windows, Internet Explorer, Edge, MS Office, MS Office Exchange Server, ChakraCore, and Adobe Flash Player—11 of which are rated critical and 39 as important in severity. Only one of these vulnerabilities, a remote code execution flaw ( CVE-2018-8267 ) in the scripting engine, is listed as being publicly known at the time of release. However, none of the flaws are listed as under active attack. Discovered by security researcher Dmitri Kaslov, the publicly known vulnerability is a remote memory-corruption issue affecting Microsoft Internet Explorer. The flaw exists within the IE rendering engine and triggers when it fails to properly handle the error objects, allowing an attacker to execute arbitrary code in the context of the currently logged-in user. Microsoft has also addressed an important vulnera
Microsoft's Meltdown Patch Made Windows 7 PCs More Insecure

Microsoft's Meltdown Patch Made Windows 7 PCs More Insecure

March 29, 2018Swati Khandelwal
Meltdown CPU vulnerability was bad, and Microsoft somehow made the flaw even worse on its Windows 7, allowing any unprivileged, user-level application to read content from and even write data to the operating system's kernel memory. For those unaware, Spectre and Meltdown were security flaws disclosed by researchers earlier this year in processors from Intel, ARM, and AMD, leaving nearly every PC, server, and mobile phone on the planet vulnerable to data theft. Shortly after the researchers disclosed the Spectre and Meltdown exploits , software vendors, including Microsoft, started releasing patches for their systems running a vulnerable version of processors. However, an independent Swedish security researcher Ulf Frisk found that Microsoft's security fixes to Windows 7 PCs for the Meltdown flaw—which could allow attackers to read kernel memory at a speed of 120 KBps—is now allowing attackers to read the same kernel memory at a speed of Gbps, making the issue even wo
Patch Tuesday: Microsoft Releases Update to Fix 53 Vulnerabilities

Patch Tuesday: Microsoft Releases Update to Fix 53 Vulnerabilities

November 14, 2017Swati Khandelwal
It's Patch Tuesday—time to update your Windows devices. Microsoft has released a large batch of security updates as part of its November Patch Tuesday in order to fix a total of 53 new security vulnerabilities in various Windows products, 19 of which rated as critical, 31 important and 3 moderate. The vulnerabilities impact the Windows OS, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Scripting Engine, .NET Core, and more. At least four of these vulnerabilities that the tech giant has now fixed have public exploits, allowing attackers to exploit them easily. But fortunately, none of the four are being used in the wild, according to Gill Langston at security firm Qualys . The four vulnerabilities with public exploits identified by Microsoft as CVE-2017-8700 (an information disclosure flaw in ASP.NET Core), CVE-2017-11827 (Microsoft browsers remote code execution), CVE-2017-11848 (Internet Explorer information disclosure) and CVE-2017-11883 (denial of ser
Unpatched Windows Kernel Bug Could Help Malware Hinder Detection

Unpatched Windows Kernel Bug Could Help Malware Hinder Detection

September 18, 2017Unknown
A 17-year-old programming error has been discovered in Microsoft's Windows kernel that could prevent some security software from detecting malware at runtime when loaded into system memory. The security issue, described by enSilo security researcher Omri Misgav, resides in the kernel routine "PsSetLoadImageNotifyRoutine," which apparently impacts all versions of Windows operating systems since Windows 2000. Windows has a built-in API, called PsSetLoadImageNotifyRoutine, that helps programs monitor if any new module has been loaded into memory. Once registered, the program receives notification each time a module is loaded into memory. This notification includes the path to the module on disk. However, Misgav found that due to "caching behaviour, along with the way the file-system driver maintains the file name and a severe coding error," the function doesn't always return the correct path of the loaded modules. What's bad? It seems like Micro
 Microsoft Is Paying Up To $250,000 With Its New Bug Bounty Program

Microsoft Is Paying Up To $250,000 With Its New Bug Bounty Program

July 26, 2017Wang Wei
Microsoft has finally launched a new dedicated bug bounty program to encourage security researchers and bug hunters for finding and responsibly reporting vulnerabilities in its latest Windows versions of operating systems and software. Being the favourite target of hackers and cyber criminals, every single zero-day vulnerability in Windows OS—from critical remote code execution, mitigation bypass and elevation of privilege to design flaws—could cause a crisis like recent WannaCry and Petya Ransomware attacks. In past five years the tech giant has launched multiple time-limited bug bounty programs focused on various Windows features, and after seeing quite a bit of success, Microsoft has decided to continue. "Security is always changing, and we prioritise different types of vulnerabilities at different points in time. Microsoft strongly believes in the value of the bug bounties, and we trust that it serves to enhance our security capabilities." With its latest bu
Exclusive Offers

Sign up for cybersecurity newsletter and get latest news updates delivered straight to your inbox daily.