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New JavaScript Malware Targeted 50,000+ Users at Dozens of Banks Worldwide

New JavaScript Malware Targeted 50,000+ Users at Dozens of Banks Worldwide

Dec 21, 2023 Online Banking / Malware
A new piece of JavaScript malware has been observed attempting to steal users' online banking account credentials as part of a campaign that has targeted more than 40 financial institutions across the world. The activity cluster, which employs JavaScript web injections, is estimated to have led to at least 50,000 infected user sessions spanning North America, South America, Europe, and Japan. IBM Security Trusteer said it detected the campaign in March 2023. "Threat actors' intention with the web injection module is likely to compromise popular banking applications and, once the malware is installed, intercept the users' credentials in order to then access and likely monetize their banking information," security researcher Tal Langus  said . Attack chains are characterized by the use of scripts loaded from the threat actor-controlled server ("jscdnpack[.]com"), specifically targeting a page structure that's common to several banks. It's susp
TrickBot Malware Using New Techniques to Evade Web Injection Attacks

TrickBot Malware Using New Techniques to Evade Web Injection Attacks

Jan 25, 2022
The cybercrime operators behind the notorious TrickBot malware have once again upped the ante by fine-tuning its techniques by adding multiple layers of defense to slip past antimalware products. "As part of that escalation, malware injections have been fitted with added protection to keep researchers out and get through security controls," IBM Trusteer  said  in a report. "In most cases, these extra protections have been applied to injections used in the process of online banking fraud — TrickBot's main activity since its inception after the  Dyre Trojan 's demise." TrickBot , which started out as a banking trojan, has evolved into a multi-purpose crimeware-as-a-service (CaaS) that's employed by a variety of actors to deliver additional payloads such as ransomware. Over 100 variations of TrickBot have been identified to date, one of which is a " Trickboot " module that can modify the UEFI firmware of a compromised device. In the fall of 2
SaaS Compliance through the NIST Cybersecurity Framework

SaaS Compliance through the NIST Cybersecurity Framework

Feb 20, 2024Cybersecurity Framework / SaaS Security
The US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) cybersecurity framework is one of the world's most important guidelines for securing networks. It can be applied to any number of applications, including SaaS.  One of the challenges facing those tasked with securing SaaS applications is the different settings found in each application. It makes it difficult to develop a configuration policy that will apply to an HR app that manages employees, a marketing app that manages content, and an R&D app that manages software versions, all while aligning with NIST compliance standards.  However, there are several settings that can be applied to nearly every app in the SaaS stack. In this article, we'll explore some universal configurations, explain why they are important, and guide you in setting them in a way that improves your SaaS apps' security posture.  Start with Admins Role-based access control (RBAC) is a key to NIST adherence and should be applied to every SaaS a
This Code Injection Technique can Potentially Attack All Versions of Windows

This Code Injection Technique can Potentially Attack All Versions of Windows

Oct 28, 2016
Guess what? If you own a Windows PC, which is fully-patched, attackers can still hack your computer. Isn't that scary? Well, definitely for most of you. Security researchers have discovered a new technique that could allow attackers to inject malicious code on every version of Microsoft's Windows operating system, even Windows 10, in a manner that no existing anti-malware tools can detect, threaten millions of PCs worldwide. Dubbed " AtomBombing ," the technique does not exploit any vulnerability but abuses a designing weakness in Windows. New Code Injection Attack helps Malware Bypass Security Measures AtomBombing attack abuses the system-level Atom Tables, a feature of Windows that allows applications to store information on strings, objects, and other types of data to access on a regular basis. And since Atom are shared tables, all sorts of applications can access or modify data inside those tables. You can read a more detailed explanation of Atom T
cyber security

Are You Vulnerable to Third-Party Breaches Through Interconnected SaaS Apps?

websiteWing SecuritySaaS Security / Risk Management
Protect against cascading risks by identifying and mitigating app2app and third-party SaaS vulnerabilities.
iBanking Android Malware targeting Facebook Users with Web Injection techniques

iBanking Android Malware targeting Facebook Users with Web Injection techniques

Apr 16, 2014
iBanking is nothing but a mobile banking Trojan app which impersonates itself as a so-called ' Security App ' for Android devices and distributed through HTML injection attacks on banking sites, in order to deceive its victims. Recently, its source code has been leaked online through an underground forum that gave the opportunities to a larger number of cyber criminals to launch attacks using this kind of ready-made mobile malware. The malicious iBanking app installed on victims' phone has capabilities to spy on user's communications. The bot allows an attacker to spoof SMS, redirect calls to any pre-defined phone number, capture audio using the device's microphone and steal other confidential data like call history log and the phone book contacts. According to new report from ESET security researchers, now this iBanking Trojan ( Android/Spy.Agent.AF ) is targeting Facebook users by tricking them to download a malware application. The malware uses
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