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The Hacker News - Cybersecurity News and Analysis: local root exploit

15-Year-Old Apple macOS 0-Day Kernel Flaw Disclosed, Allows Root Access

15-Year-Old Apple macOS 0-Day Kernel Flaw Disclosed, Allows Root Access

January 02, 2018Swati Khandelwal
A security researcher on New Year's eve made public the details of an unpatched security vulnerability in Apple's macOS operating system that can be exploited to take complete control of a system. On the first day of 2018, a researcher using the online moniker Siguza released the details of the unpatched zero-day macOS vulnerability, which he suggests is at least 15 years old, and proof-of-concept (PoC) exploit code on GitHub . The bug is a serious local privilege escalation (LPE) vulnerability that could enable an unprivileged user (attacker) to gain root access on the targeted system and execute malicious code. Malware designed to exploit this flaw could fully install itself deep within the system. From looking at the source, Siguza believes this vulnerability has been around since at least 2002, but some clues suggest the flaw could actually be ten years older than that. "One tiny, ugly bug. Fifteen years. Full system compromise," he wrote. This local p
A Decade Old Unix/Linux/BSD Root Privilege-Escalation Bug Discovered

A Decade Old Unix/Linux/BSD Root Privilege-Escalation Bug Discovered

June 20, 2017Swati Khandelwal
Update: Find working Exploits and Proof-of-Concepts at the bottom of this article. Security researchers have discovered more than a decade-old vulnerability in several Unix-based operating systems — including Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD and Solaris — which can be exploited by attackers to escalate their privileges to root, potentially leading to a full system takeover. Dubbed Stack Clash , the vulnerability ( CVE-2017-1000364 ) has been discovered in the way memory was being allocated on the stack for user space binaries. Exploiting Stack Clash Bug to Gain Root Access The explanation is simple: Each program uses a special memory region called the stack, which is used to store short-term data. It expands and contracts automatically during the execution of any program, depending upon the needs of that program. According to researchers at Qualys, who discovered and reported this bug, a malicious program can attempt to use more memory space than available on the stack,
11-Year Old Linux Kernel Local Privilege Escalation Flaw Discovered

11-Year Old Linux Kernel Local Privilege Escalation Flaw Discovered

February 22, 2017Swati Khandelwal
Another privilege-escalation vulnerability has been discovered in Linux kernel that dates back to 2005 and affects major distro of the Linux operating system, including Redhat, Debian, OpenSUSE, and Ubuntu. Over a decade old Linux Kernel bug ( CVE-2017-6074 ) has been discovered by security researcher Andrey Konovalov in the DCCP (Datagram Congestion Control Protocol) implementation using Syzkaller , a kernel fuzzing tool released by Google. The vulnerability is a use-after-free flaw in the way the Linux kernel's "DCCP protocol implementation freed SKB (socket buffer) resources for a DCCP_PKT_REQUEST packet when the IPV6_RECVPKTINFO option is set on the socket." The DCCP double-free vulnerability could allow a local unprivileged user to alter the Linux kernel memory, enabling them to cause a denial of service ( system crash ) or escalate privileges to gain administrative access on a system. "An attacker can control what object that would be and overwrite
Linux Kernel Vulnerable to Privilege Escalation and DoS Attack

Linux Kernel Vulnerable to Privilege Escalation and DoS Attack

June 07, 2014Swati Khandelwal
Multiple flaws have been identified in Linux Kernel and related software could allow hackers to hack your Linux machines, shared hosting and websites hosted on them. PRIVILEGE ESCALATION VULNERABILITY IN LINUX KERNEL A privilege escalation vulnerability has been identified in the widely used Linux kernel that could allow an attackers to take the control of users' system. On Thursday, the most popular distributor of open source Linux OS, Debian warned about this vulnerability (CVE-2014-3153) in a security update, along with some other vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel that may lead to a denial of service attack. The most critical one is the flaw (CVE-2014-3153) discovered by Pinkie Pie which resides in the futex subsystem call of Linux Kernel 2.6.32.62/3.2.59/3.4.91/3.10.41/3.12.21/3.14.5 versions , leaving a queued kernel waiter on the stack, which can be exploited to potentially execute arbitrary code with kernel mode privileges. " Pinkie Pie discovered an
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