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Telegram Calling Feature Leaks Your IP Addresses—Patch Released

Telegram Calling Feature Leaks Your IP Addresses—Patch Released

October 01, 2018Swati Khandelwal
The desktop version of the security and privacy-focused, end-to-end encrypted messaging app, Telegram , has been found leaking both users' private and public IP addresses by default during voice calls. With 200 million monthly active users as of March 2018, Telegram promotes itself as an ultra-secure instant messaging service that lets its users make end-to-end encrypted chat and voice call with other users over the Internet. Security researcher Dhiraj Mishra uncovered a vulnerability (CVE-2018-17780) in the official Desktop version of Telegram (tdesktop) for Windows, Mac, and Linux, and Telegram Messenger for Windows apps that was leaking users' IP addresses by default during voice calls due to its peer-to-peer (P2P) framework. To improve voice quality, Telegram by default uses a P2P framework for establishing a direct connection between the two users while initiating a voice call, exposing the IP addresses of the two participants. Telegram Calls Could Leak Your
How One Photo Could Have Hacked Your WhatsApp and Telegram Accounts

How One Photo Could Have Hacked Your WhatsApp and Telegram Accounts

March 15, 2017Swati Khandelwal
Next time when someone sends you a photo of a cute cat or a hot chick on WhatsApp or Telegram then be careful before you click on the image to view — it might hack your account within seconds. A new security vulnerability has recently been patched by two popular end-to-end encrypted messaging services — WhatsApp and Telegram — that could have allowed hackers to completely take over user account just by having a user simply click on a picture. The hack only affected the browser-based versions of WhatsApp and Telegram, so users relying on the mobile apps are not vulnerable to the attack. According to Checkpoint security researchers, the vulnerability resided in the way both messaging services process images and multimedia files without verifying that they might have hidden malicious code inside. For exploiting the flaw, all an attacker needed to do was sending the malicious code hidden within an innocent-looking image. Once the victim clicked on the picture, the attacker coul
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