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Gazer: A New Backdoor Targets Ministries and Embassies Worldwide

Gazer: A New Backdoor Targets Ministries and Embassies Worldwide

Aug 30, 2017
Security researchers at ESET have discovered a new malware campaign targeting consulates, ministries and embassies worldwide to spy on governments and diplomats. Active since 2016, the malware campaign is leveraging a new backdoor, dubbed Gazer , and is believed to be carried out by Turla advanced persistent threat (APT) hacking group that's been previously linked to Russian intelligence. Gazer, written in C++, the backdoor delivers via spear phishing emails and hijacks targeted computers in two steps—first, the malware drops Skipper backdoor, which has previously been linked to Turla and then installs Gazer components. In previous cyber espionage campaigns, the Turla hacking group used Carbon and Kazuar backdoors as its second-stage malware, which also has many similarities with Gazer, according to research [ PDF ] published by ESET. Gazer receives encrypted commands from a remote command-and-control server and evades detection by using compromised, legitimate website
Russian Hackers Hijack Satellite To Steal Data from Thousands of Hacked Computers

Russian Hackers Hijack Satellite To Steal Data from Thousands of Hacked Computers

Sep 10, 2015
A group of Russian hackers, most notably the Turla APT (Advanced Persistent Threat) is hijacking commercial satellites to hide command-and-control operations, a security firm said today. Turla APT group, which was named after its notorious software Epic Turla , is abusing satellite-based Internet connections in order to: Siphon sensitive data from government, military, diplomatic, research and educational organisations in the United States and Europe. Hide their command-and-control servers from law enforcement agencies. Despite some of its operations were uncovered last year, Turla APT group has been active for close to a decade, while remaining invisible by cleverly hiding from law enforcement agencies and security firms. Now, security researchers from Moscow-based cyber security firm Kaspersky Lab claim to have identified the way Turla APT group succeeded in hiding itself. The researchers said the group disguised itself by using commercial satellite Internet
Cybersecurity Tactics FinServ Institutions Can Bank On in 2024

Cybersecurity Tactics FinServ Institutions Can Bank On in 2024

Feb 14, 2024Financial Security / Cyber Threats
The landscape of cybersecurity in financial services is undergoing a rapid transformation. Cybercriminals are exploiting advanced technologies and methodologies, making traditional security measures obsolete. The challenges are compounded for community banks that must safeguard sensitive financial data against the same level of sophisticated threats as larger institutions, but often with more limited resources. The FinServ Threat Landscape Recent trends show an alarming increase in sophisticated cyber-attacks. Cybercriminals now deploy advanced techniques like deep fake technology and AI-powered attacks, making it increasingly difficult for banks to differentiate between legitimate and malicious activities. These developments necessitate a shift towards more sophisticated and adaptive cybersecurity measures. Take these industry statistics, for example. Financial firms report 703 cyberattack attempts per week.1 On average, 270 attacks (entailing unauthorized access of data, appl
Powerful Linux Trojan 'Turla' Infected Large Number of Victims

Powerful Linux Trojan 'Turla' Infected Large Number of Victims

Dec 09, 2014
Security researchers have discovered a highly nasty Linux trojan that has been used by cybercriminals in state sponsored attack in order to steal personal, confidential information from government institutions, military and pharmaceutical companies around the world. A previously unknown piece of a larger puzzle called " Turla ," one of the most complex Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs) uncovered by researchers at Kaspersky Lab in August, remained hidden on some systems for at least four years. The malware was notable for its use of a rootkit that made it extremely hard to detect. The German security company G Data believed that Turla campaign is linked to Russia and has in the past exploited a variety of Windows vulnerabilities, at least two of which were zero-days, to infect government institutions, embassies, military, education, research, and pharmaceutical companies in more than 45 countries. Recently, security researchers from Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab
cyber security

The Critical State of AI in the Cloud

websiteWiz.ioArtificial Intelligence / Cloud Security
Wiz Research reveals the explosive growth of AI adoption and what 150,000+ cloud accounts revealed about the AI surge.
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