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Microsoft set to deliver Patches for three Critical flaws, but no patch for Office Zero-day vulnerability

Microsoft set to deliver Patches for three Critical flaws, but no patch for Office Zero-day vulnerability

November 09, 2013Wang Wei
Microsoft has released advanced notification for the November 2013 security updates that are scheduled to be released on November 12, 2013. The company plans to deliver eight security bulletins for Windows 8.1, three of them are rated critical and five are important. But there's no relief in sight for a zero-day vulnerability ( CVE-2013-3906 ) in how Office handles .TIFF graphics files . The bulletins listed in Microsoft's advanced notification as critical are for remote code execution vulnerabilities in Windows operating system and the remaining vulnerabilities listed as important are said to be remote code execution, elevation of privilege, information disclosure and denial of service flaws affecting Windows operating system, as well as Microsoft Office. A malicious zero day attack capable of hijacking your PC via a vulnerability found in Windows, Office, and Lync is being exploited more widely than originally thought. Some new reports of the security resea
BlackBerry Enterprise Servers vulnerable to TIFF Image based Exploit

BlackBerry Enterprise Servers vulnerable to TIFF Image based Exploit

February 19, 2013Wang Wei
If you are a BlackBerry Enterprise Network user, here is something you need to be careful about. BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BES) users have been warned that an image-based exploit could allow hackers to access and execute code on the servers used to support corporate users of BlackBerry smartphones.  The flaw that been rated as high severity and actual vulnerability in BlackBerry Enterprise Servers resulted from how the server processes image files. Scenario to Exploit Vulnerability :  A malicious person writes a special code and then embeds it in a TIFF image file. The person then convinces a Blackberry smart phone user (whose phone is connected to a corporate BES) to view the TIFF file. As soon as the image file loads on the phone, the code runs on the Blackberry Enterprise server and either opens up a back door in the network or causes the network to crash altogether as instructed in the basic code. " RIM is not aware of any attacks on or specifically target
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