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Hackers Leaked 269 GB of U.S. Police and Fusion Centers Data Online

Hackers Leaked 269 GB of U.S. Police and Fusion Centers Data Online

Jun 22, 2020
A group of hacktivists and transparency advocates has published a massive 269 GB of data allegedly stolen from more than 200 police departments, fusion centers, and other law enforcement agencies across the United States. Dubbed BlueLeaks , the exposed data leaked by the DDoSecrets group contains hundreds of thousands of sensitive documents from the past ten years with official and personal information. DDoSecrets, or Distributed Denial of Secrets , is a transparency collective similar to WikiLeaks, which publicly publishes data and classified information submitted by leakers and hackers while claiming the organization itself never gets involved in the exfiltration of data. According to the hacktivist group, BlueLeaks dump includes "police and FBI reports, bulletins, guides and more," which "provides unique insights into law enforcement and a wide array of government activities, including thousands of documents mentioning COVID19. As you can see in the screens
Whistleblowers' Lawyer Finds Malware On Hard Disk Planted By Police

Whistleblowers' Lawyer Finds Malware On Hard Disk Planted By Police

Apr 16, 2015
An Arkansas lawyer representing three police whistleblowers has claimed that the law enforcement officials at the Fort Smith Police Department (FSPD) tried to infect his computer with Trojan viruses in order to spy on their legal opponents. What's the issue? A lawyer Matthew Campbell of the Pinnacle Law Firm in North Little Rock is representing Don Paul Bales, Rick Entmeier, and Wendall Sampson, current and former officers of the Fort Smith Police Department in the lawsuit since January 2014. The three whistleblowers exposed some frauds within the corrupt department, and, therefore, the police have illegally investigated them. " Since July 2013, the plaintiffs have been the target of nearly two dozen various investigations , Campbell told the Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette. " [This range] from accusations that they misspent FSPD funds to allegations that they were impugning the FSPD on Facebook. " What happened? Campbell provided a blank ha
How Nation-State Actors Target Your Business: New Research Exposes Major SaaS Vulnerabilities

How Nation-State Actors Target Your Business: New Research Exposes Major SaaS Vulnerabilities

Feb 15, 2024SaaS Security / Risk Management
With many of the highly publicized 2023 cyber attacks revolving around one or more SaaS applications, SaaS has become a cause for genuine concern in many boardroom discussions. More so than ever, considering that GenAI applications are, in fact, SaaS applications. Wing Security (Wing), a SaaS security company, conducted an analysis of 493 SaaS-using companies in Q4 of 2023.  Their study reveals  how companies use SaaS today, and the wide variety of threats that result from that usage. This unique analysis provides rare and important insights into the breadth and depth of SaaS-related risks, but also provides practical tips to mitigate them and ensure SaaS can be widely used without compromising security posture.  The TL;DR Version Of SaaS Security 2023 brought some now infamous examples of malicious players leveraging or directly targeting SaaS, including the North Korean group UNC4899, 0ktapus ransomware group, and Russian Midnight Blizzard APT, which targeted well-known organizat
17-Year-Old Hanged Himself After Receiving Police Ransomware Threat Email

17-Year-Old Hanged Himself After Receiving Police Ransomware Threat Email

Jan 23, 2015
Ransomware  malware threat has forced somebody for the terrible suicide and once again has marked its history by somebody's blood. Sad, but it's True! Joseph Edwards , a 17-year-old schoolboy from Windsor, Berkshire, hanged himself after receiving a bogus email appeared to be from police claiming that he'd been spotted browsing illegal websites and that a fine of 100 pound needed to be paid in order to stop the police from pursuing him. The scam email pushed the well-known Police Ransomware onto the boy's laptop and also downloaded malware that locked up his system once it was opened. Edwards was an A-level student with Autism, a developmental disability, that likely made him more susceptible to believing the Internet scam mail, supposedly sent from from Cheshire police, was genuine, a coroner heard on Thursday. Edwards was so upset and depressed by the accusation and the extortionate demand that he hanged himself hours after falling victim to the crucial threat. He was foun
cyber security

The Critical State of AI in the Cloud

websiteWiz.ioArtificial Intelligence / Cloud Security
Wiz Research reveals the explosive growth of AI adoption and what 150,000+ cloud accounts revealed about the AI surge.
Go Daddy Sites Serve Up Ransomware Malware

Go Daddy Sites Serve Up Ransomware Malware

Nov 27, 2012
Domain name registrar and website hosting provider Go Daddy is responding to a DNS attack targeting a "small number" of its hosted websites that one security firm said is enabling cyber criminals to spread ransomware.  The DNS (Domain Name System) is what transfers host-names into IP addresses, meaning computers can talk to each other and users can access them online. Godaddy said, " We suspect that the affected customers have been phished or their home machines have been affected by Cool Exploit as we have confirmed that this is not a vulnerability in the My Account or DNS management systems. " The Cool Exploit Kit targets a variety of vulnerabilities, including Java errors, and has been seen spreading via drive-by attack websites. The ransomware served depends on the country of origin. In the UK, it is malware posing as a legitimate message from the Met's Police e-Crime Unit (PCeU). It locks the computer, on the grounds that the computer was guilt
Latest Java vulnerability exploitation leads to ransomware

Latest Java vulnerability exploitation leads to ransomware

Nov 10, 2012
Imagine someone getting access to your computer, encrypting all your family photos and other priceless files, and then demanding a ransom for their safe return. That is what ransomware is all about. Symantec's latest research report suggests police-themed ransomware could be a replacement to the once-lucrative fake antivirus scareware trade. According to  report , Ransomware distributors are raking in around $5 million dollars a year and the spoils are being spread among just 16 crime groups. Symantec's estimates suggest a significant but not yet thriving crime business, which delivers each operation, on average, $300,000 a year. Reticently identified Oracle Java SE Remote Java Run time Environment vulnerability (  CVE-2012-5076 ) leads to  Geo located   Ransomware Malware . Java vulnerability actually can allows attacker to unauthorized disclosure of information, unauthorized modification and disruption of service. This Ransomware shows a bogus notification, that preten
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