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WordPress LiteSpeed Plugin Vulnerability Puts 5 Million Sites at Risk

WordPress LiteSpeed Plugin Vulnerability Puts 5 Million Sites at Risk
Feb 27, 2024 Vulnerability / Website Security
A security vulnerability has been disclosed in the LiteSpeed Cache plugin for WordPress that could enable unauthenticated users to escalate their privileges. Tracked as  CVE-2023-40000 , the vulnerability was addressed in October 2023 in version 5.7.0.1. "This plugin suffers from unauthenticated site-wide stored [cross-site scripting] vulnerability and could allow any unauthenticated user from stealing sensitive information to, in this case, privilege escalation on the WordPress site by performing a single HTTP request," Patchstack researcher Rafie Muhammad  said . LiteSpeed Cache , which is used to improve site performance, has more than five million installations. The latest version of the plugin in 6.1, which was released on February 5, 2024. The WordPress security company said CVE-2023-40000 is the result of a lack of user input sanitization and  escaping output . The vulnerability is rooted in a function named update_cdn_status() and can be reproduced in a default

Microsoft's Final 2023 Patch Tuesday: 34 Flaws Fixed, Including 4 Critical

Microsoft's Final 2023 Patch Tuesday: 34 Flaws Fixed, Including 4 Critical
Dec 13, 2023 Patch Tuesday / Windows Security
Microsoft released its final set of Patch Tuesday updates for 2023, closing out 34 flaws in its software, making it one of the lightest releases in recent years. Of the 34 shortcomings, four are rated Critical and 30 are rated Important in severity. The fixes are in addition to  18 flaws  Microsoft addressed in its Chromium-based Edge browser since the release of  Patch Tuesday updates for November 2023 . According to data from the  Zero Day Initiative , the software giant has patched more than 900 flaws this year, making it one of the busiest years for Microsoft patches. For comparison, Redmond resolved 917 CVEs in 2022. While none of the vulnerabilities are listed as publicly known or under active attack at the time of release, some of the notable ones are listed below - CVE-2023-35628  (CVSS score: 8.1) - Windows MSHTML Platform Remote Code Execution Vulnerability CVE-2023-35630  (CVSS score: 8.8) - Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) Remote Code Execution Vulnerability CVE-2

How Nation-State Actors Target Your Business: New Research Exposes Major SaaS Vulnerabilities

How Nation-State Actors Target Your Business: New Research Exposes Major SaaS Vulnerabilities
Feb 15, 2024SaaS Security / Risk Management
With many of the highly publicized 2023 cyber attacks revolving around one or more SaaS applications, SaaS has become a cause for genuine concern in many boardroom discussions. More so than ever, considering that GenAI applications are, in fact, SaaS applications. Wing Security (Wing), a SaaS security company, conducted an analysis of 493 SaaS-using companies in Q4 of 2023.  Their study reveals  how companies use SaaS today, and the wide variety of threats that result from that usage. This unique analysis provides rare and important insights into the breadth and depth of SaaS-related risks, but also provides practical tips to mitigate them and ensure SaaS can be widely used without compromising security posture.  The TL;DR Version Of SaaS Security 2023 brought some now infamous examples of malicious players leveraging or directly targeting SaaS, including the North Korean group UNC4899, 0ktapus ransomware group, and Russian Midnight Blizzard APT, which targeted well-known organizat

Researcher Demonstrates 4 New Variants of HTTP Request Smuggling Attack

Researcher Demonstrates 4 New Variants of HTTP Request Smuggling Attack
Aug 05, 2020
A new research has identified four new variants of HTTP request smuggling attacks that work against various commercial off-the-shelf web servers and HTTP proxy servers. Amit Klein, VP of Security Research at SafeBreach who presented the findings today at the Black Hat security conference, said that the attacks highlight how web servers and HTTP proxy servers are still susceptible to HTTP request smuggling even after 15 years since they were first documented. What is HTTP Request Smuggling? HTTP request smuggling (or HTTP Desyncing) is a technique employed to interfere with the way a website processes sequences of HTTP requests that are received from one or more users. Vulnerabilities related to HTTP request smuggling typically arise when the front-end (a load balancer or proxy) and the back-end servers interpret the boundary of an HTTP request differently, thereby allowing a bad actor to send (or "smuggle") an ambiguous request that gets prepended to the next le

Are You Vulnerable to Third-Party Breaches Through Interconnected SaaS Apps?

cyber security
websiteWing SecuritySaaS Security / Risk Management
Protect against cascading risks by identifying and mitigating app2app and third-party SaaS vulnerabilities.

New Ripple20 Flaws Put Billions of Internet-Connected Devices at Risk of Hacking

New Ripple20 Flaws Put Billions of Internet-Connected Devices at Risk of Hacking
Jun 16, 2020
The Department of Homeland Security and CISA ICS-CERT today issued a critical security advisory warning about over a dozen newly discovered vulnerabilities affecting billions of Internet-connected devices manufactured by many vendors across the globe. Dubbed " Ripple20 ," the set of 19 vulnerabilities resides in a low-level TCP/IP software library developed by Treck, which, if weaponized, could let remote attackers gain complete control over targeted devices—without requiring any user interaction. According to Israeli cybersecurity company JSOF—who discovered these flaws—the affected devices are in use across various industries, ranging from home/consumer devices to medical, healthcare, data centers, enterprises, telecom, oil, gas, nuclear, transportation, and many others across critical infrastructure. "Just a few examples: data could be stolen off of a printer, an infusion pump behavior changed, or industrial control devices could be made to malfunction. An

Kaspersky Antivirus Flaw Exposed Users to Cross-Site Tracking Online

Kaspersky Antivirus Flaw Exposed Users to Cross-Site Tracking Online
Aug 15, 2019
In this digital era, the success of almost every marketing, advertising, and analytics company drives through tracking users across the Internet to identify them and learn their interests to provide targeted ads. Most of these solutions rely on 3rd-party cookies, a cookie set on a domain other than the one you are browsing, which allows companies including Google and Facebook to fingerprint you in order to track your every move across multiple sites. However, if you're using Kaspersky Antivirus, a vulnerability in the security software had exposed a unique identifier associated with you to every website you visited in the past 4 years, which might have allowed those sites and other third-party services to track you across the web even if you have blocked or erased third-party cookies timely. The vulnerability, identified as CVE-2019-8286 and discovered by independent security researcher Ronald Eikenberg, resides in the way a URL scanning module integrated into the antivir

Facebook to Pay $5 Billion Fine to Settle FTC Privacy Investigation

Facebook to Pay $5 Billion Fine to Settle FTC Privacy Investigation
Jul 13, 2019
After months of negotiations, the United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has approved a record $5 billion settlement with Facebook over its privacy investigation into the Cambridge Analytica scandal . The settlement will put an end to a wide-ranging probe that began more than a year ago and centers around the violation of a 2011 agreement Facebook made with the FTC that required Facebook to gain explicit consent from users to share their personal data. The FTC launched an investigation into the social media giant last year after it was revealed that the company allowed Cambridge Analytica access to the personal data of around  87 million Facebook users without their explicit consent. Now, according to a new report published by the Wall Street Journal, the FTC commissioners this week finally voted to approve a $5 billion settlement, with three Republicans voting to approve the deal and two Democrats against it. Facebook anticipated the fine to between $3 billion and

Google DNS Service (8.8.8.8) Now Supports DNS-over-TLS Security

Google DNS Service (8.8.8.8) Now Supports DNS-over-TLS Security
Jan 10, 2019
Almost every activity on the Internet starts with a DNS query, a key function of the Internet that works as an Internet's directory where your device looks up for the server IP addresses after you enter a human-readable web address (e.g., thehackernews.com). Since DNS queries are sent in clear text over UDP or TCP without encryption, the information can reveal not only what websites an individual visits but is also vulnerable to spoofing attacks. To address these problems, Google announced Wednesday that its Public DNS (Domain Name System) service finally supports DNS-over-TLS security protocol, which means that the DNS queries and responses will be communicated over TLS-encrypted TCP connections. The DNS-over-TLS has been designed to make it harder for man-in-the-middle attackers to manipulate the DNS query or eavesdrop on your Internet connection. Launched over eight years ago, Google Public DNS, at IP addresses 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4, is world's largest public Domai

Robert W. Taylor, Who Helped Create the Internet, Dies at 85

Robert W. Taylor, Who Helped Create the Internet, Dies at 85
Apr 17, 2017
Image by New York Times The Internet just lost one of its most prominent innovators. Robert W Taylor, a computer scientist who was instrumental in creating the Internet as well as the modern personal computer, has died at the age of 85. Mr. Taylor, who is best known as the mastermind of ARPAnet (precursor of the Internet), had Parkinson's disease and died on Thursday at his home in Woodside, California, his son Kurt Kurt Taylor told US media . While the creation of the Internet was work of many hands, Mr. Taylor made many contributions. As a researcher for the US military's Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) in 1966, Taylor helped pioneer the concept of shared networks, as he was frustrated with constantly switching between 3 terminals to communicate with researchers across the country. His frustration led the creation of ARPAnet — a single computer network to link each project with the others — and this network then evolved into what we now know as the In

Tor Project Releases Sandboxed Tor Browser 0.0.2

Tor Project Releases Sandboxed Tor Browser 0.0.2
Dec 12, 2016
The non-profit organization behind TOR – the largest online anonymity network that allows people to hide their real identity online – has launched an early alpha version of Sandboxed Tor Browser 0.0.2 . Yes, the Tor Project is working on a sandboxed version of the Tor Browser that would isolate the Tor Browser from other processes of the operating system and limit its ability to interact or query low-level APIs that can lead to the exposure of real IP addresses, MAC addresses, computer name, and more. Sandboxing is a security mechanism for separating running programs. When an application is sandboxed, its process runs in a separate environment from the underlying operating system, so that errors or security issues in that application can not be leveraged to affect other parts of the OS. Sandbox applications are enabled in their own sequestered area and memory, where they can be worked on without posing any threat to other applications or the operating system. Major modern br

'Web Of Trust' Browser Add-On Caught Selling Users' Data — Uninstall It Now

'Web Of Trust' Browser Add-On Caught Selling Users' Data — Uninstall It Now
Nov 08, 2016
Browser extensions have become a standard part of the most popular browsers and essential part of our lives for surfing the Internet. But not all extensions can be trusted. One such innocent looking browser add-on has been caught collecting browsing history of millions of users and selling them to third-parties for making money. An investigation by German television channel NDR ( Norddeutscher Rundfunk ) has discovered a series of privacy breaches by Web Of Trust (WOT) – one of the top privacy and security browser extensions used by more than 140 Million online users to help keep them safe online. Web of Trust has been offering a " Safe Web Search & Browsing " service since 2007. The WOT browser extension, which is available for both Firefox and Chrome, uses crowdsourcing to rate websites based on trustworthiness and child safety. However, it turns out that the Web of Trust service collects extensive data about netizens' web browsing habits via its brows

New Privacy Rules require ISPs to must Ask you before Sharing your Sensitive Data

New Privacy Rules require ISPs to must Ask you before Sharing your Sensitive Data
Oct 28, 2016
Good News for privacy concerned people! Now, your online data will not be marketed for business; at least by your Internet Service Providers (ISPs). Yes, it's time for your ISPs to ask your permission in order to share your sensitive data for marketing or advertisement purposes, the FCC rules. On Thursday, the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has imposed new privacy rules on Internet Service Providers (ISPs) that restrict them from sharing your online history with third parties without your consent. In a 3-2 vote, the FCC approved the new rules by which many privacy advocates seem pleased, while some of them wanted the Commission to even apply the same rules to web-based services like Google and Facebook as well. Initially proposed earlier this year, the new rule says : "ISPs are required to obtain affirmative 'opt-in' consent from consumers to use and share sensitive information." What does 'sensitive' information mean h

An Army of Million Hacked IoT Devices Almost Broke the Internet Today

An Army of Million Hacked IoT Devices Almost Broke the Internet Today
Oct 22, 2016
A massive Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack against Dyn , a major domain name system (DNS) provider, broke large portions of the Internet on Friday, causing a significant outage to a ton of websites and services, including Twitter, GitHub, PayPal, Amazon, Reddit, Netflix, and Spotify. But how the attack happened? What's the cause behind the attack? Exact details of the attack remain vague, but Dyn reported a huge army of hijacked internet-connected devices could be responsible for the massive attack. Yes, the same method recently employed by hackers to carry out record-breaking DDoS attack of over 1 Tbps against France-based hosting provider OVH. According to security intelligence firm Flashpoint , Mirai bots were detected driving much, but not necessarily all, of the traffic in the DDoS attacks against DynDNS. Mirai is a piece of malware that targets Internet of Things (IoT) devices such as routers, and security cameras, DVRs, and enslaves vast numbers of

France warns Microsoft to Stop Collecting Windows 10 Users' Personal Data

France warns Microsoft to Stop Collecting Windows 10 Users' Personal Data
Jul 21, 2016
We have heard a lot about privacy concerns surrounding Windows 10 and accusations on Microsoft of collecting too much data about users without their consent. Now, the French data protection authority has ordered Microsoft to stop it. France's National Data Protection Commission (CNIL) issued a formal notice on Wednesday, asking Microsoft to "stop collecting excessive data" as well as "tracking browsing by users without their consent." The CNIL, Commission Nationale de l'Informatique et des Libertés, ordered Microsoft to comply with the French Data Protection Act within 3 months, and if fails, the commission will issue a sanction against the company. Moreover, the CNIL notified Microsoft that the company must also take "satisfactory measures to ensure the security and confidentiality" of its users' personal data. The notice comes after a series of investigations between April and June 2016 by French authorities, revealing that Mic

Core Tor Contributor Leaves Project; Shutting Down Important Tor Nodes

Core Tor Contributor Leaves Project; Shutting Down Important Tor Nodes
Jul 19, 2016
Another blow to the Tor Project : One of the Tor Project's earliest contributors has decided to quit the project and shut down all of the important Tor nodes under his administration. Lucky Green was part of the Tor Project before the anonymity network was known as TOR. He probably ran one of the first 5 nodes in the TOR network at its inception and managed special nodes inside the anonymity network. However, Green announced last weekend that "it is no longer appropriate" for him to be part of the Tor Project, whether it is financially or by providing computing resources. TOR, also known as The Onion Router , is an anonymity network that makes use of a series of nodes and relays to mask its users' traffic and hide their identity by disguising IP addresses and origins. The TOR network is used by privacy-conscious people, activists, journalists and users from countries with strict censorship rules. Crucial and Fast TOR Nodes to be Shut Down Soon Alongs

Microsoft Wins! Govt Can't Force Tech Companies to Hand Over Data Stored Overseas

Microsoft Wins! Govt Can't Force Tech Companies to Hand Over Data Stored Overseas
Jul 15, 2016
Especially after the Snowden revelations of global  mass surveillance by US intelligence agencies at home and abroad, various countries demanded tech companies including Google, Apple, and Microsoft to set-up and maintain their servers in respective countries in order to keep their citizen data within boundaries. The US government has powers to comply US-based tech companies with the court orders to hand over their customers' data stored on servers, even if the data centers are beyond US borders. Now, the recent court decision has proven that the data centers and servers located outside the US boundaries are safe haven. The Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York ruled Thursday that the United States government cannot force tech companies to give the FBI or other federal authorities access to their non-US customers' data stored on servers located in other countries. US Government Can't go Beyond its Boundaries to Collect Data Yes, the Stored Communicatio

WebUSB API — Connect Your USB Devices Securely to the Internet

WebUSB API — Connect Your USB Devices Securely to the Internet
Apr 12, 2016
Two Google engineers have developed a draft version of an API called WebUSB that would allow you to connect your USB devices to the Web safely and securely, bypassing the need for native drivers. WebUSB – developed by Reilly Grant and Ken Rockot – has been introduced to the World Wide Web Consortium's Web Incubator Community Group (W3C WICG), is build to offer a universal platform that could be adopted by browser makers in future versions of their software. Connecting USB Devices to the Web WebUSB API allows USB-connected devices, from keyboards, mice, 3D printers and hard drives to complex Internet of Things (IoTs) appliances, to be addressed by Web pages. The aim is to help hardware manufacturers have their USB devices work on any platform, including Web, without having any need to write native drivers or SDKs for a dedicated platform. Besides controlling the hardware, a Web page could also install firmware updates as well as perform other essential tasks. Howev

Password Security — Who's to Blame for Weak Passwords? Users, Really?

Password Security — Who's to Blame for Weak Passwords? Users, Really?
Jan 26, 2016
The majority of Internet users are vulnerable to cyber threats because of their own weaknesses in setting up a strong password. But, are end-users completely responsible for choosing weak passwords? Give a thought. Recently we wrote an article revealing the list of Worst Passwords of 2015 that proved most of us are still using bad passwords, like ' 123456 ' or ' password ,' to secure our online accounts that when breached could result in critical information loss. If the end-user is to blame for weak password security, then the solution is to educate each and every Internet user to follow the best password security practice. But is that really possible? Practically, No. Even after being aware of best password security measures, do we really set strong passwords for every website? I mean EVERY. Ask yourself. Who's Responsible for allowing Users to Set a Weak Password? It's the websites and their developers, who didn't enforce a
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