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Serious Bug Exposes Sensitive Data From Millions Sites Sitting Behind CloudFlare

Serious Bug Exposes Sensitive Data From Millions Sites Sitting Behind CloudFlare

February 24, 2017Swati Khandelwal
A severe security vulnerability has been discovered in the CloudFlare content delivery network that has caused big-name websites to expose private session keys and other sensitive data. CloudFlare, a content delivery network (CDN) and web security provider that helps optimize safety and performance of over 5.5 Million websites on the Internet, is warning its customers of the critical bug that could have exposed a range of sensitive information, including passwords, and cookies and tokens used to authenticate users. Dubbed Cloudbleed , the nasty flaw is named after the Heartbleed bug that was discovered in 2014, but believed to be worse than Heartbleed. The vulnerability is so severe that it not only affects websites on the CloudFlare network but affects mobile apps as well. What exactly is "Cloudbleed," how it works, how are you affected by this bug, and how you can protect yourself? Let's figure it out. What is Cloudbleed? Discovered by Google Project Ze
Over 199,500 Websites Are Still Vulnerable to Heartbleed OpenSSL Bug

Over 199,500 Websites Are Still Vulnerable to Heartbleed OpenSSL Bug

January 23, 2017Swati Khandelwal
It's more than two and half years since the discovery of the critical OpenSSL Heartbleed vulnerability , but the flaw is still alive as it appears that many organizations did not remediate properly to the serious security glitch. It was one of the biggest flaws in the Internet's history that affected the core security of as many as two-thirds of the world's servers i.e. half a million servers at the time of its discovery in April 2014. However, the critical bug still affects more than 199,500 systems even after 2 years and 9 months have already passed, according to a new report published today on Shodan, a search engine that scans for vulnerable devices. Over 199,500 Systems Still Vulnerable to Heartbleed Heartbleed (CVE-2014-0160) was a serious bug in the OpenSSL's implementation of the TLS/DTLS heartbeat extension that allowed attackers to read portions of the affected server’s memory, potentially revealing users data that the server isn't intended to re
Google to Disable Weak SSLv3 and RC4 Protocols to Boost Internet Security

Google to Disable Weak SSLv3 and RC4 Protocols to Boost Internet Security

September 19, 2015Swati Khandelwal
It is finally time to say GoodBye to the old and insecure Web security protocols. Citing the long history of weaknesses in the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) 3.0 cryptographic protocol and the RC4 Cipher Suite, Google plans to disable support for both SSLv3 as well as RC4 stream cipher in its front-end servers. While announcing on its official blog , the Search Engine giant said the company is looking to put away SSLv3 and RC4 in all of its front-end servers, and eventually, in all its software including Chrome, Android, Web crawlers, and email servers. The move by Google came as no surprise, considering the fact that both RC4 and SSLv3 have been deemed unsecure by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). What are the Problems? SSLv3, which was made outdated 16 years ago, has a long history of security problems like BEAST , out of them the most recent one was POODLE ( Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption ) attacks, which lead to the recovery of plaintext communication
OpenSSL to Patch Undisclosed High Severity Vulnerability this Thursday

OpenSSL to Patch Undisclosed High Severity Vulnerability this Thursday

July 07, 2015Mohit Kumar
Attention Please! System Administrator and anyone relying on OpenSSL should be prepared to switch to a new version of the open-source crypto library that will be released this Thursday 9th July. OpenSSL is a widely used open-source software library that provides encrypted Internet connections using SSL/TLS for majority of websites, as well as other secure services. The new versions of OpenSSL crypto library, versions 1.0.2d and 1.0.1p , address a single security vulnerability classified as "high severity," the OpenSSL Project Team announced on Monday. There isn't more details about the mystery security vulnerability available yet, except for the fact that the security vulnerability doesn't affect the 1.0.0 or 0.9.8 series. "The OpenSSL project team would like to announce the forthcoming release of OpenSSL versions 1.0.2d and 1.0.1p," developer Mark J Cox announced in a mailing list note published yesterday. "These releases will be
Venom Vulnerability Exposes Most Data Centers to Cyber Attacks

Venom Vulnerability Exposes Most Data Centers to Cyber Attacks

May 14, 2015Swati Khandelwal
Just after a new security vulnerability surfaced Wednesday, many tech outlets started comparing it with HeartBleed, the serious security glitch uncovered last year that rendered communications with many well-known web services insecure, potentially exposing Millions of plain-text passwords. But don’t panic. Though the recent vulnerability has a more terrific name than HeartBleed , it is not going to cause as much danger as HeartBleed did. Dubbed VENOM , stands for Virtualized Environment Neglected Operations Manipulation , is a virtual machine security flaw uncovered by security firm CrowdStrike that could expose most of the data centers to malware attacks, but in theory. Yes, the risk of Venom vulnerability is theoretical as there is no real-time exploitation seen yet, while, on the other hand, last year’s HeartBleed bug was practically exploited by hackers unknown number of times, leading to the theft of critical personal information. Now let’s know more about Ven
GnuPG Email Encryption Project Relies on 'Werner Koch', and He is Running Out of Funds

GnuPG Email Encryption Project Relies on 'Werner Koch', and He is Running Out of Funds

February 06, 2015Mohit Kumar
Werner Koch , the man who authored the free email encryption software , is running out of funding to continue the development of his crucial open-source GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG) encryption tools.The code works on plenty of operating systems from Linux and FreeBSD to Windows and OS X. The popular Gnu Privacy Guard (GnuPG or GPG) email encryption software is the same used by the former United States National Security Agency (NSA) contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden to keep his communication secure from law enforcement authorities. GPG uses the OpenPGP standard to safeguard the communications of millions of people, including journalists, dissidents and security-minded people, around the world from eavesdroppers and other miscreants. GPG EMAIL ENCRYPTION RELIES ON THIS GUY ONLY Werner Koch has been maintaining and improving the code of his own secure email software since its initial development in 1997, and since then he has worked at very low wages, but is now
Google Releases 'nogotofail' Network Traffic Security Testing Tool

Google Releases 'nogotofail' Network Traffic Security Testing Tool

November 05, 2014Wang Wei
Google introduced a new security tool to help developers detect bugs and security glitches in the network traffic security that may leave passwords and other sensitive information open to snooping. The open source tool, dubbed as Nogotofail , has been launched by the technology giant in sake of a number of vulnerabilities discovered in the implementation of the transport layer security, from the most critical Heartbleed bug in OpenSSL to the Apple's gotofail bug to the recent POODLE bug in SSL version 3. The company has made the Nogotofail tool available on GitHub, so that so anyone can test their applications, contribute new features to the project, provide support for more platforms, and help improve the security of the internet. Android security engineer Chad Brubaker said that the Nogotofail main purpose is to confirm that internet-connected devices and applications aren't vulnerable to transport layer security (TLS) and Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) encry
POODLE SSL 3.0 Attack Exploits Widely-used Web Encryption Standard

POODLE SSL 3.0 Attack Exploits Widely-used Web Encryption Standard

October 15, 2014Wang Wei
Another Heartbleed-like vulnerability has been discovered in the decade old but still widely used Secure Sockets Layer ( SSL ) 3.0 cryptographic protocol that could allow an attacker to decrypt contents of encrypted connections to websites. Google's Security Team revealed on Tuesday that the most widely used web encryption standard SSL 3.0 has a major security vulnerability that could be exploited to steal sensitive data. The flaw affects any product that follows the Secure layer version 3, including Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer. Researchers dubbed the attack as " POODLE ," stands for Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption , which allows an attacker to perform a man-in-the-middle attack in order to decrypt HTTP cookies. The POODLE attack can force a connection to “fallback” to SSL 3.0, where it is then possible to steal cookies, which are meant to store personal data, website preferences or even passwords. Three Google security engineers - Bodo Möll
Web-based DropCam Surveillance Systems Vulnerable to Hackers

Web-based DropCam Surveillance Systems Vulnerable to Hackers

July 15, 2014Wang Wei
The popular home surveillance webcam service DropCam that keep an eye on your house when you aren’t there, can be used as a weapon against you by the cybercriminals, claimed a pair of researchers. San Francisco-based DropCam, last month announced it would be acquired by Google’s Nest for $555 million in cash, makes home-monitoring cameras for the past five years, which allow users to keep track of what's going on inside their homes using a small surveillance camera. Two researchers named Patrick Wardle and Colby Moore of Synack who discovered the weakness in the Wi-Fi enabled video monitoring system, which they will demonstrate at the DEFCON 22 Hacker Conference in Las Vegas next month. This WiFi-enabled security camera, that comes for $149 or $199, depending on video quality, requires little-to-no-effort to maintain. You plug it in, get it up on your WiFi, and all is set. If you want to check in on your cameras remotely, it cost you nothing, and if you want DropCam
Android 4.3 and Earlier versions Vulnerable to Critical Code-Execution Flaw

Android 4.3 and Earlier versions Vulnerable to Critical Code-Execution Flaw

June 27, 2014Swati Khandelwal
A critical code-execution vulnerability almost affecting everyone those are not running the most updated version of Google Android , i.e. Android version 4.4 also known as KitKat. After nine months of vulnerability disclosure to the Android security team, researchers of the Application Security team at IBM have finally revealed all the possible details of a serious code-execution vulnerability that still affects the Android devices running versions 4.3 and earlier, which could allow attackers to exfiltrate sensitive information from the vulnerable devices. “ Considering Android’s fragmented nature and the fact that this was a code-execution vulnerability, we decided to wait a bit with the public disclosure ,” said Roee Hay, a security research group leader at IBM. The researchers found the stack buffer overflow vulnerability that resides in the Android's KeyStore storage service, which according to the Android developers’ website is the service code running in Androi
Google Unveils BoringSSL, Another Flavor of OpenSSL

Google Unveils BoringSSL, Another Flavor of OpenSSL

June 21, 2014Mohit Kumar
The open source encryption protocol, OpenSSL, which is used by several social networks, search engines, banks and other websites to enable secure connections while transmitting data, came to everybody's attention following the Heartbleed vulnerability , a critical bug in the OpenSSL's implementation of the TLS/DTLS heartbeat extension that allows attackers to read portions of the affected server’s memory, potentially revealing users data, that the server did not intend to reveal. Now, the biggest Internet giant Google is launching a new fork of OpenSSL, which they dubbed as BoringSSL, developed by its own independent work with the code. " We have used a number of patches on top of OpenSSL for many years, " Adam Langley, a cryptography engineer and Google employee, wrote in a blog post introducing BoringSSL. " Some of them have been accepted into the main OpenSSL repository, but many of them don't mesh with OpenSSL's guarantee of API and ABI
OpenSSL Vulnerable to Man-in-the-Middle Attack and Several Other Bugs

OpenSSL Vulnerable to Man-in-the-Middle Attack and Several Other Bugs

June 05, 2014Mohit Kumar
Remember OpenSSL Heartbleed vulnerability ? Several weeks ago, the exposure of this security bug chilled the Internet, revealed that millions of websites were vulnerable to a flaw in the OpenSSL code which they used to encrypt their communications. Now once again the OpenSSL Foundation has issued software updates to patch six new vulnerabilities, and two of them are critical. MAN-IN-THE-MIDDLE ATTACK (CVE-2014-0224) First critical vulnerability (CVE-2014-0224) in OpenSSL is " CCS Injection " - resides in ChangeCipherSpec (CCS) request sent during the handshake that could allow an attacker to perform a man-in-the-middle attack against the encrypted connection servers and clients.  By exploiting this vulnerability an attacker could intercept an encrypted connection which allows him to decrypt, read or manipulate the data. But the reported flaw is exploitable only if both server and client are vulnerable to this issue. According to the OpenSSL advisory , " An attacker
Critical GnuTLS Flaw Leaves SSL Clients Vulnerable to Remote Code Execution

Critical GnuTLS Flaw Leaves SSL Clients Vulnerable to Remote Code Execution

June 04, 2014Mohit Kumar
GnuTLS, a widely used open source SSL/TLS cryptographic library is vulnerable to a buffer overflow vulnerability that could be exploited to crash TLS clients or potentially execute malicious code on underlying systems. The GnuTLS library implements secure sockets layer (SSL) and transport layer security (TLS) protocols on computers, servers, and softwares to provide encrypted communications over insecure channels. The bug ( CVE-2014-3466 ) was independently discovered by Joonas Kuorilehto of security firm Codenomicon, the same security firm who discovered the biggest Internet vulnerability, Heartbleed. Unlike Heartbleed, the GnuTLS library is not as widely deployed as OpenSSL. The GnuTLS Vulnerability resides in the way GnuTLS parses the session ID from the server response during a TLS handshake. It does not check the length of session ID value in the ServerHello message, which allows a malicious server to send an excessively long value in order to execute buffer overf
Beware Of Fake 'HeartBleed Bug Remover Tool', Hijacks System with Malware

Beware Of Fake 'HeartBleed Bug Remover Tool', Hijacks System with Malware

May 28, 2014Wang Wei
I am considering that you all must have read my last article on OpenSSL Heartbleed , a critical bug in the OpenSSL's implementation of the TLS/DTLS heartbeat extension that allows attackers to read portions of the affected server’s memory, potentially revealing users data, that the server did not intend to reveal. The Heartbleed vulnerability made headlines around the world and my last article explains everything about probably the biggest Internet vulnerability in recent history, but still some readers are not aware of its nature, otherwise they would not have been a victim of the spam campaigns. Spammers are very smart on gaining from every opportunity they get, so this time they are taking advantage of the infamous Heartbleed bug and frighten the users into installing Anti-Heartbleed Software onto their systems, which is obviously a malware. The researchers at Symantec have unearthed a spam campaign targeting people by sending spam emails that warns them their
300,000 Servers Still Vulnerable to Heartbleed Vulnerability After One Month

300,000 Servers Still Vulnerable to Heartbleed Vulnerability After One Month

May 09, 2014Swati Khandelwal
It’s more than a month since we all were warned of the critical OpenSSL Heartbleed vulnerability , but that doesn't mean it disappeared. The critical bug compromised many popular websites and after been discovered the problem was solved. But is that so? No, not at all! A recent finding from the security researcher Robert David Graham claims that there are still more than 300,000 servers apparently remain vulnerable to the most critical OpenSSL bug, Heartbleed, which is admittedly down in numbers from the previous which resulted in over 600,000 systems a month ago. Graham announced on the Errata Security blog that he arrived at the number through a recently done global internet scan (or at least the important bits: port 443 of IPv4 addresses), which reveals that exactly 318,239 systems are still vulnerable to the OpenSSL Heartbleed bug and over 1.5 million servers still support the vulnerable "heartbeat" feature of OpenSSL that allowed the critical bug. “
SRTT Vulnerability in BIND Software Puts DNS Protocol Security At Risk

SRTT Vulnerability in BIND Software Puts DNS Protocol Security At Risk

May 06, 2014Swati Khandelwal
After the Heartbleed bug that exposed half of the Internet vulnerable to hackers thereby marking as one of the largest Internet vulnerability in recent history, the critical flaw in the implementation of the DNS protocol could also represent a serious menace to the Internet security. A Serious security vulnerability has been discovered in the algorithms of DNS software – BIND by the two Israeli students ' Roee Hay ' and ' Jonathan Kalechstein ', who are working under a project out at the Laboratory of Computer Communication & Networking in the Faculty of Computer Science at the Technion , which was led by Dr. Gabi Nakibly from Rafael (Rafael Advanced Defense Systems Ltd.). Although, Technion students have not provided any detail explanation about the vulnerability , but indicated that by exploiting the DNS protocol flaw an attacker could redirect the users who are trying to visit a legitimate website to a fake and bogus website which the attacker con
Nasty Covert Redirect Vulnerability found in OAuth and OpenID

Nasty Covert Redirect Vulnerability found in OAuth and OpenID

May 03, 2014Swati Khandelwal
After Heartbleed bug , a security flaw in widely used open-source software OpenSSL that puts countless websites at risk, another vulnerability has been found in popular authentication software OpenID and authorization software OAuth. Wang Jing , a Chinese mathematics Ph.D student at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, found that the OAuth and OpenID open source login tools are vulnerable to the " Covert Redirect " exploit. The login tools ‘ OAuth ’ and ‘OpenID’ protocols are the commonly used open standard for authorization. OAuth designed as a way for users to sign in or sign up for other services using an existing identity of a site such as Google, Facebook, Microsoft or Twitter, whereas OpenID is a decentralized authentication system for the Internet that allows users to log in at websites across the internet with same digital identity. The Covert Redirect vulnerability could affect those who use ‘OAuth’ and ‘OpenID’ protocols to ‘login’ to the websites
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