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The Continuing Threat of Unpatched Security Vulnerabilities

The Continuing Threat of Unpatched Security Vulnerabilities

Mar 08, 2022
Unpatched software is a computer code containing known security weaknesses. Unpatched vulnerabilities refer to weaknesses that allow attackers to leverage a known security bug that has not been patched by running malicious code. Software vendors write additions to the codes, known as "patches," when they come to know about these application vulnerabilities to secure these weaknesses. Adversaries often probe into your software, looking for unpatched systems and attacking them directly or indirectly. It is risky to run unpatched software. This is because attackers get the time to become aware of the  software's unpatched vulnerabilities  before a patch emerges. A  report  found that unpatched vulnerabilities are the most consistent and primary ransomware attack vectors. It was recorded that in 2021,  65  new vulnerabilities arose that were connected to ransomware. This was observed to be a twenty-nine percent growth compared to the number of vulnerabilities in 2020.  Gr
Taking the Risk-Based Approach to Vulnerability Patching

Taking the Risk-Based Approach to Vulnerability Patching

Jul 27, 2022
Software vulnerabilities are a major threat to organizations today. The cost of these threats is significant, both financially and in terms of reputation. Vulnerability management and patching can easily get out of hand when the number of vulnerabilities in your organization is in the hundreds of thousands of vulnerabilities and tracked in inefficient ways, such as using Excel spreadsheets or multiple reports, especially when many teams are involved in the organization. Even when a process for patching is in place, organizations still struggle to effectively patch vulnerabilities in their assets. This is generally because teams look at the severity of vulnerabilities and tend to apply patches to vulnerabilities in the following severity order: critical > high > medium > low > info. The following sections explain why this approach is flawed and how it can be improved. Why is Patching Difficult? While it is well known that vulnerability patching is extremely important, it
SaaS Compliance through the NIST Cybersecurity Framework

SaaS Compliance through the NIST Cybersecurity Framework

Feb 20, 2024Cybersecurity Framework / SaaS Security
The US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) cybersecurity framework is one of the world's most important guidelines for securing networks. It can be applied to any number of applications, including SaaS.  One of the challenges facing those tasked with securing SaaS applications is the different settings found in each application. It makes it difficult to develop a configuration policy that will apply to an HR app that manages employees, a marketing app that manages content, and an R&D app that manages software versions, all while aligning with NIST compliance standards.  However, there are several settings that can be applied to nearly every app in the SaaS stack. In this article, we'll explore some universal configurations, explain why they are important, and guide you in setting them in a way that improves your SaaS apps' security posture.  Start with Admins Role-based access control (RBAC) is a key to NIST adherence and should be applied to every SaaS a
13 Critical Flaws Discovered in AMD Ryzen and EPYC Processors

13 Critical Flaws Discovered in AMD Ryzen and EPYC Processors

Mar 13, 2018
Security researchers claimed to have discovered 13 critical Spectre/Meltdown -like vulnerabilities throughout AMD's Ryzen and EPYC lines of processors that could allow attackers to access sensitive data, install persistent malware inside the chip, and gain full access to the compromised systems. All these vulnerabilities reside in the secure part of the AMD's Zen architecture processors and chipsets—typically where device stores sensitive information such as passwords and encryption keys and makes sure nothing malicious is running when you start your PC. The alleged vulnerabilities are categorized into four classes—RYZENFALL, FALLOUT, CHIMERA, and MASTERKEY—and threaten wide-range of servers, workstations, and laptops running vulnerable AMD Ryzen, Ryzen Pro, Ryzen Mobile or EPYC processors. Discovered by a team of researchers at Israel-based CTS-Labs, newly disclosed  unpatched vulnerabilities defeat AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) technology and could
cyber security

Are You Vulnerable to Third-Party Breaches Through Interconnected SaaS Apps?

websiteWing SecuritySaaS Security / Risk Management
Protect against cascading risks by identifying and mitigating app2app and third-party SaaS vulnerabilities.
Implementing Risk-Based Vulnerability Discovery and Remediation

Implementing Risk-Based Vulnerability Discovery and Remediation

May 30, 2023 Vulnerability Management
In this day and age, vulnerabilities in software and systems pose a considerable danger to businesses, which is why it is essential to have an efficient vulnerability management program in place. To stay one step ahead of possible breaches and reduce the damage they may cause, it is crucial to automate the process of finding and fixing vulnerabilities depending on the level of danger they pose. This post will discuss the fundamental approaches and tools to implement and automate risk-based vulnerability management. To make this process easier, consider using an  all-in-one cloud-based solution  right from the start. Implementing a risk-based vulnerability management program A risk-based vulnerability management program is a complex preventative approach used for swiftly detecting and ranking vulnerabilities based on their potential threat to a business. By implementing a risk-based vulnerability management approach, organizations can improve their security posture and reduce the lik
Why Everyone Needs to Take the Latest CISA Directive Seriously

Why Everyone Needs to Take the Latest CISA Directive Seriously

Dec 03, 2021
Government agencies publish notices and directives all the time. Usually, these are only relevant to government departments, which means that nobody else really pays attention. It's easy to see why you would assume that a directive from CISA just doesn't relate to your organization. But, in the instance of the latest CISA directive, that would be making a mistake. In this article, we explain why, even if you're in the private or non-government sector, you should nonetheless take a close look at CISA Binding Operational Directive 22-01. We outline why CISA was forced to issue this directive, and why that firm action has implications for all organizations – inside and outside of government. Acting on cybersecurity issues isn't as simple as flicking a switch, of course, so keep reading to find out how you can address the core issue behind the CISA directive. Okay, so what exactly is a CISA directive? Let's take a step back to gain some context. Just like any organ
Microsoft, Adobe and Mozilla issue Critical Security Patch Updates

Microsoft, Adobe and Mozilla issue Critical Security Patch Updates

May 13, 2015
This week you have quite a long list of updates to follow from Microsoft, Adobe as well as Firefox. Despite announcing plans to kill its monthly patch notification for Windows 10, the tech giant has issued its May 2015 Patch Tuesday , releasing 13 security bulletins that addresses a total of 48 security vulnerabilities in many of their products. Separately, Adobe has also pushed a massive security update to fix a total of 52 vulnerabilities in its Flash Player, Reader, AIR and Acrobat software. Moreover, Mozilla has fixed 13 security flaws in its latest stable release of Firefox web browser, Firefox 38, including five critical flaws. First from the Microsoft's side: MICROSOFT PATCH TUESDAY Three out of 13 security bulletins issued by the company are rated as 'critical', while the rest are 'important' in severity, with none of these vulnerabilities are actively exploited at this time. The affected products include Internet Explorer (IE),
Thousands of High-Risk Vulnerabilities Found in NOAA Satellite System

Thousands of High-Risk Vulnerabilities Found in NOAA Satellite System

Sep 10, 2014
The informational systems that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) run are loaded with several critical vulnerabilities that could leave it vulnerable to cyber attacks. According to the findings of an audit recently conducted by the Department of Commerce's Office of the Inspector General (OIG), the Joint Polar Satellite System's (JPSS) ground system is vulnerable to a large number of high-risk vulnerabilities. The JPSS ground system is used to collect data from several polar-orbiting weather satellites, and distribute the information to users worldwide. This system also provides command, control and data processing for current and future weather satellites. But, the vulnerabilities identified in the system could impair technology controlling the United States' next generation of polar-orbiting environmental satellites. " Our analysis of the JPSS program's assessments of system vulnerabilities found that, since FY 2012, the number of high-ris
A Comprehensive Guide On How to Protect Your Websites From Hackers

A Comprehensive Guide On How to Protect Your Websites From Hackers

Oct 17, 2019
Humankind had come a long way from the time when the Internet became mainstream. What started as a research project ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network) funded by DARPA has grown exponentially and has single-handedly revolutionized human behavior. When WWW (world wide web) came into existence, it was meant to share information over the Internet, from there part through natural evolution and part through webonomics driving innovations, Internet & www has metamorphosized into the lifeblood of the world. It is hard to imagine now how the world functioned before the time of the Internet. It has touched each aspect of human life and is now critical for day to day existence. No business today can exist without an online presence. It is no more just a medium to share information, but world economics runs over the web nowadays. Organizations, governments, and people all depend on this. New warfares will not happen in the real world but would be fought over the cyber
Last Years Open Source - Tomorrow's Vulnerabilities

Last Years Open Source - Tomorrow's Vulnerabilities

Nov 01, 2022
Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux and Git, has his own law in software development, and it goes like this: " given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow ." This phrase puts the finger on the very principle of open source: the more, the merrier - if the code is easily available for anyone and everyone to fix bugs, it's pretty safe. But is it? Or is the saying "all bugs are shallow" only true for  shallow  bugs and not ones that lie deeper? It turns out that security flaws in open source can be harder to find than we thought. Emil W√•reus, Head of R&D at  Debricked , took it upon himself to look deeper into the community's performance. As the data scientist he is, he, of course, asked the data:  how good is the open source community at finding vulnerabilities in a timely manner ? The thrill of the (vulnerability) hunt Finding open source vulnerabilities is typically done by the maintainers of the open source project, users, auditors, or external secur
U.S. Federal Agencies Ordered to Patch Hundreds of Actively Exploited Flaws

U.S. Federal Agencies Ordered to Patch Hundreds of Actively Exploited Flaws

Nov 05, 2021
The U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has  published  a  catalog  of vulnerabilities, including from Apple, Cisco, Microsoft, and Google, that have known exploits and are being actively exploited by malicious cyber actors, in addition to requiring federal agencies to prioritize applying patches for those security flaws within "aggressive" timeframes. "These vulnerabilities pose significant risk to agencies and the federal enterprise," the agency  said  in a binding operational directive (BOD) issued Wednesday. "It is essential to aggressively remediate known exploited vulnerabilities to protect federal information systems and reduce cyber incidents." About 176 vulnerabilities identified between 2017 and 2020, and 100 flaws from 2021 have made their way to the initial list, which is expected to be updated with additional actively exploited vulnerabilities as and when they become known provided they have been assigned Common Vu
OWASP's 2021 List Shuffle: A New Battle Plan and Primary Foe

OWASP's 2021 List Shuffle: A New Battle Plan and Primary Foe

Oct 20, 2021
Code injection attacks, the infamous king of vulnerabilities, have lost the top spot to broken access control as the worst of the worst, and developers need to take notice. In this increasingly chaotic world, there have always been a few constants that people could reliably count on: The sun will rise in the morning and set again at night, Mario will always be cooler than Sonic the Hedgehog, and code injection attacks will always occupy the top spot on the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) list of the  top ten most common  and dangerous vulnerabilities that attackers are actively exploiting. Well, the sun will rise tomorrow, and Mario still has "one-up" on Sonic, but code injection attacks have fallen out of the number one spot on the infamous OWASP list, refreshed in 2021. One of the oldest forms of attacks,  code injection vulnerabilities  have been around almost as long as computer networking. The blanket vulnerability is responsible for a wide range of attacks, inclu
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