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Hacker who reported flaw in Hungarian Telekom faces up to 8-years in prison

Hacker who reported flaw in Hungarian Telekom faces up to 8-years in prison

February 01, 2019Mohit Kumar
Many of you might have this question in your mind: "Is it illegal to test a website for vulnerability without permission from the owner?" Or… "Is it illegal to disclose a vulnerability publicly?" Well, the answer is YES, it's illegal most of the times and doing so could backfire even when you have good intentions. Last year, Hungarian police arrested a 20-year-old ethical hacker accused of finding and exploiting serious vulnerabilities in Magyar Telekom, the largest Hungarian telecommunication company, who is now facing up to 8 years in prison. According to local Hungarian media , the defender first discovered a severe vulnerability in Magyar Telekom systems in April 2018 and reported it to the company officials, who later invited him to a meeting. Reportedly, the hacker then traveled to Budapest for the meeting, which didn't go well as he expected, and apparently, the company did not permit him to test its systems further. However, the man conti
WhiteSource Bolt for GitHub: Free Open Source Vulnerability Management App for Developers

WhiteSource Bolt for GitHub: Free Open Source Vulnerability Management App for Developers

December 05, 2018Wang Wei
Developers around the world depend on open source components to build their software products. According to industry estimates, open source components account for 60-80% of the code base in modern applications. Collaboration on open source projects throughout the community produces stronger code, squashing the bugs and catching the vulnerabilities that impact the security of organizations who look to open source components as the key to their application building success. Thanks in part to the "thousand eyeballs" of the community, the number of reported vulnerabilities in open source projects is on the rise, spiking 51% in 2017 from the previous year. This is even more concerning since, as shown in the same study, most vulnerabilities are found in popular projects. Data shows that 32% of the top 100 open source projects have at least one vulnerability, meaning that developers have their work cut out for them, no matter which components they are using in their products.
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