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The Hacker News - Cybersecurity News and Analysis: password security

A Successful Self-Service Password Reset (SSPR) Project Requires User Adoption

A Successful Self-Service Password Reset (SSPR) Project Requires User Adoption
September 10, 2020The Hacker News
IT help desks everywhere are having to adjust to the 'new normal' of supporting mainly remote workers. This is a major shift away from visiting desks across the office and helping ones with traditional IT support processes. Many reasons end-users may contact the helpdesk. However, password related issues are arguably the most common. Since the onset of the global pandemic that began earlier this year, help desks are now dealing with password resets of users who are working remotely. Servicing users who are working remotely and assisting with password resets can be cumbersome and expose organizations to potential security risks. Self-service password reset (SSPR) solutions can significantly assist in providing the tools that remote workers need to service their accounts. However, there can be challenges with enrollment and other issues. Let's take a look at SSPR and see how businesses can manage enrollment compliance. What is Self-Service Password Reset (SSPR)

Any Indian DigiLocker Account Could've Been Accessed Without Password

Any Indian DigiLocker Account Could've Been Accessed Without Password
June 08, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
The Indian Government said it has addressed a critical vulnerability in its secure document wallet service Digilocker that could have potentially let a remote attacker bypass mobile one-time passwords (OTP) and sign in as other users. Discovered separately by two independent bug bounty researchers, Mohesh Mohan and Ashish Gahlot , the vulnerability could have been exploited easily to unauthorisedly access sensitive documents uploaded by targeted users' on the Government-operated platform. "The OTP function lacks authorization which makes it possible to perform OTP validation with submitting any valid users details and then manipulation flow to sign in as a totally different user," Mohesh Mohan said in a disclosure shared with The Hacker News. With over 38 million registered users, Digilocker is a cloud-based repository that acts as a digital platform to facilitate online processing of documents and speedier delivery of various government-to-citizen services.

Why SaaS opens the door to so many cyber threats (and how to make it safer)

Why SaaS opens the door to so many cyber threats (and how to make it safer)
April 17, 2020The Hacker News
Cloud services have become increasingly important to many companies' daily operations, and the rapid adoption of web apps has allowed businesses to continue operating with limited productivity hiccups, even as global coronavirus restrictions have forced much of the world to work from home. But at the same time, even major corporations have fallen prey to hackers. How can you maintain the integrity of your IT resources and data while still taking advantage of the benefits of software as a service (SaaS)? While cybersecurity is a broad and complicated topic, let's consider a hypothetical SaaS scenario and examine some of the risks. Imagine that one of your employees is writing a sensitive report. It could have financial or medical data in it. It could have information on a revolutionary new design. Whatever it is, the report needs to be kept confidential. What would happen if your employee writes the report in Google Docs? Let's assume that this decision wasn&

Android Cookie-Stealing Malware Found Hijacking Facebook Accounts

Android Cookie-Stealing Malware Found Hijacking Facebook Accounts
March 13, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
A new simple but dangerous strain of Android malware has been found in the wild that steals users' authentication cookies from the web browsing and other apps, including Chrome and Facebook, installed on the compromised devices. Dubbed " Cookiethief " by Kaspersky researchers, the Trojan works by acquiring superuser root rights on the target device, and subsequently, transfer stolen cookies to a remote command-and-control (C2) server operated by attackers. "This abuse technique is possible not because of a vulnerability in the Facebook app or browser itself," Kaspersky researchers said. "Malware could steal cookie files of any website from other apps in the same way and achieve similar results." Cookiethief: Hijacking Accounts Without Requiring Passwords Cookies are small pieces of information that's often used by websites to differentiate one user from another, offer continuity around the web, track browsing sessions across different

LifeLabs Paid Hackers to Recover Stolen Medical Data of 15 Million Canadians

LifeLabs Paid Hackers to Recover Stolen Medical Data of 15 Million Canadians
December 18, 2019Mohit Kumar
LifeLabs, the largest provider of healthcare laboratory testing services in Canada, has suffered a massive data breach that exposed the personal and medical information of nearly 15 million Canadians customers. The company announced the breach in a press release posted on its website, revealing that an unknown attacker unauthorizedly accessed its computer systems last month and stole customers' information, including their: Names Addresses Email addresses Login information Passwords, for their LifeLabs account Dates of birth Health card numbers Lab test results The Toronto-based company discovered the data breach at the end of October, but the press release does not say anything about the identity of the attacker(s) and how they managed to infiltrate its systems. However, LifeLabs admitted it paid an undisclosed amount of ransom to the hackers to retrieve the stolen data, which indicates that the attack might have been carried out using a ransomware style malwa

UNIX Co-Founder Ken Thompson's BSD Password Has Finally Been Cracked

UNIX Co-Founder Ken Thompson's BSD Password Has Finally Been Cracked
October 11, 2019Mohit Kumar
A 39-year-old password of Ken Thompson , the co-creator of the UNIX operating system among, has finally been cracked that belongs to a BSD-based system, one of the original versions of UNIX, which was back then used by various computer science pioneers. In 2014, developer Leah Neukirchen spotted an interesting " /etc/passwd " file in a publicly available source tree of historian BSD version 3, which includes hashed passwords belonging to more than two dozens Unix luminaries who worked on UNIX development, including Dennis Ritchie, Stephen R. Bourne, Ken Thompson, Eric Schmidt, Stuart Feldman, and Brian W. Kernighan. Since all passwords in that list are protected using now-depreciated DES-based crypt(3) algorithm and limited to at most 8 characters, Neukirchen decided to brute-force them for fun and successfully cracked passwords (listed below) for almost everyone using password cracking tools like John the Ripper and hashcat. The ones that she wasn't able to crack

DoorDash Breach Exposes 4.9 Million Users' Personal Data

DoorDash Breach Exposes 4.9 Million Users' Personal Data
September 27, 2019Swati Khandelwal
Do you use DoorDash frequently to order your food online? If yes, you are highly recommended to change your account password right now . DoorDash—the popular on-demand food-delivery service—today confirmed a massive data breach that affects almost 5 million people using its platform, including its customers, delivery workers, and merchants as well. DoorDash is a San Francisco-based on-demand food delivery service (just like Zomato and Swiggy in India) that connects people with their local restaurants and get delivered food on their doorsteps with the help of contracted drivers, also known as "Dashers." The service operates in more than 4,000 cities across the United States and Canada. What happened? In a blog post published today, DoorDash said the company became aware of a security intrusion earlier this month after it noticed some "unusual activity" from a third-party service provider. Immediately after detecting the security intrusion, the comp

XKCD Forum Hacked – Over 562,000 Users' Account Details Leaked

XKCD Forum Hacked – Over 562,000 Users’ Account Details Leaked
September 03, 2019Mohit Kumar
XKCD —one of the most popular webcomic platforms known for its geeky tech humor and other science-laden comic strips on romance, sarcasm, math, and language—has suffered a data breach exposing data of its forum users. The security breach occurred two months ago, according to security researcher Troy Hunt who alerted the company of the incident, with unknown hackers stealing around 562,000 usernames, email and IP addresses, as well as hashed passwords. However, the leaked data was actually discovered by security researcher and data analyst Adam Davies, who shared a copy of it with Hunt. At the time of writing, XKCD has taken down its forum and posted a short notice on its homepage, as shared below, urging its users to change their passwords immediately. "The xkcd forums are currently offline. We've been alerted that portions of the PHPBB user table from our forums showed up in a leaked data collection. The data includes usernames, email addresses, salted, hashe

Foxit PDF Software Company Suffers Data Breach—Asks Users to Reset Password

Foxit PDF Software Company Suffers Data Breach—Asks Users to Reset Password
August 30, 2019Swati Khandelwal
If you have an online account with Foxit Software, you need to reset your account password immediately—as an unknown attacker has compromised your personal data and log-in credentials. Foxit Software, a company known for its popular lightweight Foxit PDF Reader and PhantomPDF applications being used by over 525 million users, today announced a data breach exposing the personal information of 'My Account' service users. Though for using free versions of any Foxit PDF software doesn't require users to sign up with an account, the membership is mandatory for customers who want to access "software trial downloads, order histories, product registration information, and troubleshooting and support information." According to a blog post published today by Foxit, unknown third-parties gained unauthorized access to its data systems recently and accessed its "My Account" registered users' data, including their email addresses, passwords, users' n

Android Users Can Now Log in to Google Services Using Fingerprint

Android Users Can Now Log in to Google Services Using Fingerprint
August 12, 2019Swati Khandelwal
If you're using Chrome on Android, you can now sign-in to your Google account and some of the other Google services by simply using your fingerprint, instead of typing in your password every time. Google is rolling out a new feature, called " local user verification ," that allows you to log in to both native applications and web services by registering your fingerprint or any other method you've set up to unlock your Android device, including pins, pattern or password. The newly introduced mechanism, which has also been named "verify it's you," takes advantage of Android's built-in FIDO2 certified security key feature that Google rolled out earlier this year to all devices running Android version 7.0 Nougat or later. Besides FIDO2 protocol, the feature also relies on W3C WebAuthn (Web Authentication API) and FIDO Client to Authenticator Protocol (CTAP), which are designed to provide simpler and more secure authentication mechanism that sit

Slack Resets Passwords For Users Who Hadn't Changed It Since 2015 Breach

Slack Resets Passwords For Users Who Hadn't Changed It Since 2015 Breach
July 18, 2019Swati Khandelwal
If you use Slack, a popular cloud-based team collaboration server, and recently received an email from the company about a security incident, don't panic and read this article before taking any action. Slack has been sending a "password reset" notification email to all those users who had not yet changed passwords for their Slack accounts since 2015 when the company suffered a massive data breach. For those unaware, in 2015, hackers unauthorisedly gained access to one of the company's databases that stored user profile information, including their usernames, email addresses, and hashed passwords. At that time, attackers also secretly inserted code, probably on the login page, which allowed them to capture plaintext passwords entered by some Slack users during that time. However, immediately following the security incident, the company automatically reset passwords for those small number of Slack users whose plaintext passwords were exposed, but asked other aff

A New Ransomware Is Targeting Network Attached Storage (NAS) Devices

A New Ransomware Is Targeting Network Attached Storage (NAS) Devices
July 10, 2019Mohit Kumar
A new ransomware family has been found targeting Linux-based Network Attached Storage (NAS) devices made by Taiwan-based QNAP Systems and holding users' important data hostage until a ransom is paid, researchers told The Hacker News. Ideal for home and small business, NAS devices are dedicated file storage units connected to a network or through the Internet, which allow users to store and share their data and backups with multiple computers. Independently discovered by researchers at two separate security firms, Intezer and Anomali, the new ransomware family targets poorly protected or vulnerable QNAP NAS servers either by brute forcing weak SSH credentials or exploiting known vulnerabilities. Dubbed " QNAPCrypt " by Intezer and " eCh0raix " by Anomali, the new ransomware is written in the Go programming language and encrypts files with targeted extensions using AES encryption and appends .encrypt extension to each. However, if a compromised NAS devic

Google Stored G Suite Users' Passwords in Plain-Text for 14 Years

Google Stored G Suite Users' Passwords in Plain-Text for 14 Years
May 22, 2019Swati Khandelwal
After Facebook and Twitter, Google becomes the latest technology giant to have accidentally stored its users' passwords unprotected in plaintext on its servers—meaning any Google employee who has access to the servers could have read them. In a blog post published Tuesday, Google revealed that its G Suite platform mistakenly stored unhashed passwords of some of its enterprise users on internal servers in plaintext for 14 years because of a bug in the password recovery feature. G Suite, formerly known as Google Apps, is a collection of cloud computing, productivity, and collaboration tools that have been designed for corporate users with email hosting for their businesses. It's basically a business version of everything Google offers. The flaw, which has now been patched, resided in the password recovery mechanism for G Suite customers that allows enterprise administrators to upload or manually set passwords for any user of their domain without actually knowing their

Bluetooth Flaw Found in Google Titan Security Keys; Get Free Replacement

Bluetooth Flaw Found in Google Titan Security Keys; Get Free Replacement
May 16, 2019Swati Khandelwal
A team of security researchers at Microsoft discovered a potentially serious vulnerability in the Bluetooth-supported version of Google's Titan Security Keys that could not be patched with a software update. However, users do not need to worry as Google has announced to offer a free replacement for the affected Titan Security Key dongles. In a security advisory published Wednesday, Google said a "misconfiguration in the Titan Security Keys Bluetooth pairing protocols" could allow an attacker who is physically close to your Security Key (~within 30 feet) to communicate with it or the device to which your key is paired. Launched by Google in August last year, Titan Security Key is a tiny low-cost USB device that offers hardware-based two-factor authentication (2FA) for online accounts with the highest level of protection against phishing attacks. Titan Security Key, which sells for $50 in the Google Store, includes two keys—a USB-A security key with NFC, and a

New York, Canada, Ireland Launch New Investigations Into Facebook Privacy Breaches

New York, Canada, Ireland Launch New Investigations Into Facebook Privacy Breaches
April 27, 2019Swati Khandelwal
Facebook has a lot of problems, then there are a lot of problems for Facebook—and both are not going to end anytime sooner. Though Facebook has already set aside $5 billion from its revenue to cover a possible fine the company is expecting as a result of an FTC investigation over privacy violations, it seems to be just first installment of what Facebook has to pay for continuously ignoring users' privacy. This week, Facebook has been hit with three new separate investigations from various governmental authorities—both in the United States and abroad—over the company's mishandling of its users' data . New York Attorney General to Investigate Facebook Email Collection Scandal New York Attorney General is opening an investigation into Facebook's unauthorized collection of the email contacts of more than 1.5 million users during site registration without their permission. Earlier this month, Facebook was caught practicing the worst ever user-verification mechanism

Facebook Mistakenly Stored Millions of Users' Passwords in Plaintext

Facebook Mistakenly Stored Millions of Users' Passwords in Plaintext
March 21, 2019Mohit Kumar
Holy moly, Facebook is again at the center of a new privacy controversy after revealing today that its platform mistakenly kept a copy of passwords for "hundreds of millions" users in plaintext. What's more? Not just Facebook, Instagram users are also affected by the latest security incident. So, if you are one of the affected users, your Facebook or Instagram password was readable to some of the Facebook engineers who have internal access to the servers and the database. Though the social media company did not mention exactly what component or application on its website had the programmatic error that caused the issue, it did reveal that the company discovered the security blunder in January this year during a routine security check. In a blog post published today, Facebook's vice president of engineering Pedro Canahuati said an internal investigation of the incident found no evidence of any Facebook employee abusing those passwords. "To be clear, t

Android Gets FIDO2 Certification—Now Supports Secure Passwordless Logins

Android Gets FIDO2 Certification—Now Supports Secure Passwordless Logins
February 25, 2019Swati Khandelwal
Great news. If you have already installed the latest update of Google Play Services released earlier today, and your Android device is running Android version 7.0 Nougat or above—Congratulations! Your device is now FIDO2 Certified. Are you thinking… what the heck that actually means? It means, instead of remembering complex passwords for your online accounts, you can now actually use your Android's built-in fingerprint sensor or FIDO security keys for secure password-less access to log into apps and websites that support the FIDO2 protocols, Google and the FIDO Alliance—a consortium that develops open source authentication standards—announced Monday. FIDO2 (Fast Identity Online) protocol offers strong passwordless authentication based on standard public key cryptography using hardware FIDO authenticators like security keys, mobile phones, and other built-in devices. FIDO2 protocol is a combination of W3C's WebAuthn API that allows developers to integrate FIDO aut
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