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The Pirate Bay loses its Main Domain Name in Court Battle

The Pirate Bay loses its Main Domain Name in Court Battle

May 13, 2016Swati Khandelwal
The Pirate Bay has fought many legal battles since its launch in 2003 to keep the website operational for the last 13 years. However, this time The Pirate Bay is suffering a major blow after the Swedish Court ruled Thursday that it will take away the domain names 'ThePirateBay.se' and 'PirateBay.se' of the world's most popular torrent website and will hand over them to the state. As its name suggests, The Pirate Bay is one of the most popular file-sharing torrent site predominantly used for downloading pirated or copyrighted media and programs free of charge. Despite the criminal convictions, the torrent site remains functioning although it has moved to different Web domains several times. However, this time, The Pirate Bay loses its main .SE domain, the world's 225th most popular website according to the Alexa ranking, according to Swedish newspaper DN . "In common with the District Court ruling the Court of Appeal finds that there is a b
ISPs will warn you about pirate content with Copyright Alert System

ISPs will warn you about pirate content with Copyright Alert System

October 21, 2012Mohit Kumar
According to the Center for Copyright Information, the controversial " Copyright Alert System " will hit the U.S. within weeks. A blog post by Jill Lesser, executive director of the Center for Copyright Information, revealed the long-awaited Copyright Alert System (CAS) will begin "in the coming weeks" and provided some details about the partnership with ISPs to deter subscribers from infringement over peer-to-peer networks. AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Verizon are all participating, and will roll out their responses over the next two months. The so-called Copyright Alert System varies by ISP, but calls for gradually more severe responses to each infringement, starting with emailed warnings and escalating to throttled data speeds or temporary suspension of service. However, offenders can request a review of their network activity by paying a $35 billing fee. If the offender is found not guilty, the $35 will be refunded. The Cop
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