The Hacker News Logo
Subscribe to Newsletter

The Hacker News - Cybersecurity News and Analysis: how to hack gmail

Over 12,000 Google Users Hit by Government Hackers in 3rd Quarter of 2019

Over 12,000 Google Users Hit by Government Hackers in 3rd Quarter of 2019

November 27, 2019Wang Wei
As part of its active efforts to protect billions of online users, Google identified and warned over 12,000 of its users who were targeted by a government-backed hacking attempt in the third quarter of this year. According to a report published by Google's Threat Analysis Group (TAG), more than 90 percent of the targeted users were hit with " credential phishing emails " that tried to trick victims into handing over access to their Google account. Google's TAG tracks over 270 government-backed hacking groups from over 50 countries that are involved in intelligence collection, stealing intellectual property, destructive cyber attacks, targeting dissidents, journalists, and activists, or spreading coordinated disinformation. The alerts were sent to targeted users between July and September 2019, which is consistent within a +/-10 percent range of the number of phishing email warnings sent in the same period of 2018 and 2017, the company said. These warnings u
Reminder—Third Party Gmail Apps Can Read Your Emails, "Allow" Carefully!

Reminder—Third Party Gmail Apps Can Read Your Emails, "Allow" Carefully!

July 03, 2018Mohit Kumar
Reminder—If you've forgotten about any Google app after using it once a few years ago, be careful, it may still have access to your private emails. When it comes to privacy on social media, we usually point fingers at Facebook for enabling third-party app developers to access users personal information—even with users' consent. But Facebook is not alone. Google also has a ton of information about you and this massive pool of data can be accessed by third-party apps you connect to, using its single sign-on service. Though Google has much stricter privacy policies about what developers can do with your data, the company still enables them to ask for complete access of your Google account, including the content of your emails and contacts. The entire Facebook's  Cambridge Analytica privacy saga highlights how crucial it is to keep track of the apps you have connected to your social media accounts and permitted to access your data. Last year, Google itself prom
Google Redesigns Gmail – Here's a List of Amazing New Features

Google Redesigns Gmail – Here's a List of Amazing New Features

April 25, 2018Swati Khandelwal
Google has finally been rolling out its new massively redesigned Gmail  for desktop and mobile to 1.4 billion of users worldwide, which might be the most significant single upgrade in Gmail's history. This huge revamped version of the email service now offers plenty of new features such as confidential mode, offline support, email snoozing and more, to make Gmail more smarter, secure, and easier to use. In this article, I have listed details of the most significant changes that you need to know and how to use them. Give it a quick read. New 'Confidential Mode' Features For Security & Privacy Are you afraid of sending sensitive documents in an email due to fear of hacking or being forwarded? Well, now you can simply click the lock icon at the bottom of an email to enable the new Confidential Mode, which lets you add a bunch of extra layers of security (as mentioned below) to the emails of your choice. 1) Self-Destructing Emails:  This feature lets you se
Enable Google's New "Advanced Protection" If You Don't Want to Get Hacked

Enable Google's New "Advanced Protection" If You Don't Want to Get Hacked

October 18, 2017Swati Khandelwal
It is good to be paranoid when it comes to cybersecurity. Google already provides various advanced features such as login alerts and two-factor authentication to keep your Google account secure. However, if you are extra paranoid, Google has just introduced its strongest ever security feature, called " Advanced Protection ," which makes it easier for users, who are usually at high risk of targeted online attacks, to lock down their Google accounts like never before. "We took this unusual step because there is an overlooked minority of our users that are at particularly high risk of targeted online attacks," the company said in a blog post announcing the program on Tuesday.  "For example, these might be campaign staffers preparing for an upcoming election, journalists who need to protect the confidentiality of their sources, or people in abusive relationships seeking safety." Even if a hacker somehow gets your password—using advanced phishing a
Gmail for iOS Adds Anti-Phishing Feature that Warns of Suspicious Links

Gmail for iOS Adds Anti-Phishing Feature that Warns of Suspicious Links

August 14, 2017Mohit Kumar
Phishing — is an older style of cyber-attack but remains one of the most common and efficient attack vectors for attackers, as a majority of banking malware and various ransomware attacks begin with a user clicking on a malicious link or opening a dangerous attachment in an email. Phishing has evolved than ever before in the past few years – which is why it remains one of those threats that we have been combating for many years. We have seen phishing campaigns that are so convincing and effective that even tech-savvy people can be tricked into giving away their credentials to hackers. And some that are " almost impossible to detect " and used to trick even the most careful users on the Internet. To help combat this issue, Google has introduced a security defence for it's over a billion users that will help users weed out phishing emails from their Gmail inbox. Google has rolled out new anti-phishing security checks for its Gmail app for iPhone users that will
Warning! Don't Click that Google Docs Link You Just Received in Your Email

Warning! Don't Click that Google Docs Link You Just Received in Your Email

May 03, 2017Swati Khandelwal
Did someone just share a random Google Doc with you? First of all — Do not click on that Google Doc link you might have just received in your email and delete it immediately — even if it's from someone you know. I, my colleagues at The Hacker News, and even people all around the Internet, especially journalists, are receiving a very convincing OAuth phishing email, which says that the person [sender] " has shared a document on Google Docs with you. " Once you clicked the link, you will be redirected to a page which says, " Google Docs would like to read, send and delete emails, as well access to your contacts, " asking your permission to "allow" access. If you allow the access, the hackers would immediately get permission to manage your Gmail account with access to all your emails and contacts, without requiring your Gmail password. Beware! New GoogleDocs Phishing Email Scam Spreading Across the World — Here's Everything You Need to K
Don't Fall For This Dangerously Convincing Ongoing Phishing Attack

Don't Fall For This Dangerously Convincing Ongoing Phishing Attack

January 16, 2017Mohit Kumar
Security researchers have discovered a new phishing campaign targeting Gmail users, which is so convincing and highly effective that even tech-savvy people can be tricked into giving away their Google credentials to hackers. The attackers first compromise a victim's Gmail account, and once they are in, they start rifling through inboxes to launch secondary attacks in order to pass on the attack. The hackers first look for an attachment that victims have previously sent to their contacts and a relevant subject from an actual sent email. Then the criminals will start gathering up contact email addresses, who become the new targets of the attackers. After finding one, the hackers create an image (screenshot) of that attachment and include it in reply to the sender with the same or similar subject for the email, invoking recognition and automatic trust. What makes this attack so effective is that the phishing emails come from someone the victim knows. This new Gmail phishi
Over 1 Million Google Accounts Hacked by 'Gooligan' Android Malware

Over 1 Million Google Accounts Hacked by 'Gooligan' Android Malware

November 30, 2016Mohit Kumar
If you own an Android smartphone, Beware! A new Android malware that has already breached more than 1 Million Google accounts is infecting around 13,000 devices every day. Dubbed Gooligan , the malware roots vulnerable Android devices to steal email addresses and authentication tokens stored on them. With this information in hands, the attackers are able to hijack your Google account and access your sensitive information from Google apps including Gmail, Google Photos, Google Docs, Google Play, Google Drive, and G Suite. Researchers found traces of Gooligan code in dozens of legitimate-looking Android apps on 3rd-party app stores, which if downloaded and installed by an Android user, malware starts sending your device's information and stolen data to its Command and Control (C&C) server. "Gooligan then downloads a rootkit from the C&C server that takes advantage of multiple Android 4 and 5 exploits including the well-known VROOT (CVE-2013-6282) and Towelroot (CV
Android Will Alert You When A New Device Logs-in Your Google Account

Android Will Alert You When A New Device Logs-in Your Google Account

August 02, 2016Mohit Kumar
Google has rolled out a new feature for Android users to keep its users account more secure: Native Android Push Notification when a new device accesses your Google account. Google has already been offering email notification for newly added devices, but since people usually ignore emails, the tech giant will now send a push notification to your device screen, giving you a chance to change your password immediately before an intruder gets in. Although it's a little change, the company believes people pay four times more attention on push notifications on their devices compared to email notification. The new feature " increases transparency to the user of what actions they've performed and allows them to flag any suspicious activity they may be seeing on the device, " the company says in its official blog post . So, from now on, when a new device is added to your Google account, or, in other words, when a new device accesses your account, you will receive a
This Simple Trick Requires Only Your Phone Number to Hack your Email Account

This Simple Trick Requires Only Your Phone Number to Hack your Email Account

June 20, 2015Wang Wei
We all have been receiving spam phone calls and messages on almost daily basis from scammers who want to pilfer your money and personal information, but a new type of social engineering hack that makes use of just your mobile number to trick you is a little scarier. Security firm Symantec is warning people about a new password recovery scam that tricks users into handing over their webmail account access to the attackers. In order to get into your email account, an attacker does not need any coding or technical skills. All an attacker needs your email address in question and your cell phone number. Since the process to reset the password is almost similar to all mail services, this new password recovery scam affects all popular webmail services including Gmail, Yahoo, and Outlook among others. Symantec has provided a video explanation of how this new hack attack works. The trick is as simple as it sounds: if you want to reset someone's email account password, all y
Bypassing Google Two Factor Authentication

Bypassing Google Two Factor Authentication

February 26, 2013Mohit Kumar
Duo Security found a loophole in Google's authentication system that allowed them to Google's two factor authentication and gain full control over a user's Gmail account by abusing the unique passwords used to connect individual applications to Google accounts. Duo Security itself a two-factor authentication provider and the flaw is located in the auto-login mechanism implemented in Chrome in the latest versions of Android, that allowed them to use an ASP to gain access to a Google account's recovery and 2-step verification settings.  Auto-login allowed users who linked their mobile devices or Chromebooks to their Google accounts to automatically access all Google-related pages over the Web without ever seeing another login page. " Generally, once you turn on 2-step verification, Google asks you to create a separate Application-Specific Password for each application you use (hence "Application-Specific") that doesn't support logins using 2-step verif
Online Courses and Software

Sign up for cybersecurity newsletter and get latest news updates delivered straight to your inbox daily.