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TeamViewer Flaw Could Let Hackers Steal System Password Remotely

TeamViewer Flaw Could Let Hackers Steal System Password Remotely

Aug 10, 2020
If you are using TeamViewer, then beware and make sure you're running the latest version of the popular remote desktop connection software for Windows. TeamViewer team recently released a new version of its software that includes a patch for a severe vulnerability ( CVE 2020-13699 ), which, if exploited, could let remote attackers steal your system password and eventually compromise it. What's more worrisome is that the attack can be executed almost automatically without requiring much interaction of the victims and just by convincing them to visit a malicious web page once. For those unaware, TeamViewer is a popular remote-support software that allows users to securely share their desktop or take full control of other's PC over the Internet from anywhere in the world. The remote access software is available for desktop and mobile operating systems, including Windows, macOS, Linux, Chrome OS, iOS, Android, Windows RT Windows Phone 8, and BlackBerry. Discovered b
Report Reveals TeamViewer Was Breached By Chinese Hackers In 2016

Report Reveals TeamViewer Was Breached By Chinese Hackers In 2016

May 17, 2019
The German software company behind TeamViewer, one of the most popular software in the world that allows users to access and share their desktops remotely, was reportedly compromised in 2016, the German newspaper Der Spiegel revealed today. TeamViewer is popular remote-support software that allows you to securely share your desktop or take full control of other's PC over the Internet from anywhere in the world. With millions of users making use of its service, TeamViewer has always been a target of interest for attackers. According to the publication , the cyber attack was launched by hackers with Chinese origin who used Winnti trojan malware, activities of which have previously been found linked to the Chinese state intelligence system. Active since at least 2010, Winnti advanced persistent threat (APT) group has previously launched a series of financial attacks against software and gaming organizations primarily in the United States, Japan, and South Korea. The group i
New TeamViewer Hack Could Allow Clients to Hijack Viewers' Computer

New TeamViewer Hack Could Allow Clients to Hijack Viewers' Computer

Dec 06, 2017
Do you have remote support software TeamViewer installed on your desktop? If yes, then you should pay attention to a critical vulnerability discovered in the software that could allow users sharing a desktop session to gain complete control of the other's PC without permission. TeamViewer is a popular remote-support software that lets you securely share your desktop or take full control of other's PC over the Internet from anywhere in the world. For a remote session to work both computers—the client (presenter) and the server (viewer)—must have the software installed, and the client has to share a secret authentication code with the person he wants to share his desktop. However, a GitHub user named "Gellin" has disclosed a vulnerability in TeamViewer that could allow the client (sharing its desktop session) to gain control of the viewer's computer without permission. TeamViewer Hack Could Be Used By Anyone—Server Or Client Gellin has also publishe
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Defending Your Commits From Known CVEs With GitGuardian SCA And Git Hooks

Defending Your Commits From Known CVEs With GitGuardian SCA And Git Hooks

May 20, 2024Software Security / Vulnerability
All developers want to create secure and dependable software. They should feel proud to release their code with the full confidence they did not introduce any weaknesses or anti-patterns into their applications. Unfortunately, developers are not writing their own code for the most part these days. 96% of all software contains some open-source components, and open-source components make up between  70% and 90% of any given piece of modern software . Unfortunately for our security-minded developers, most modern vulnerabilities come from those software components.  As new vulnerabilities emerge and are publicly reported as  Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures  (CVEs), security teams have little choice but to ask the developer to refactor the code to include different versions of the dependencies. Nobody is happy in this situation, as it blocks new features and can be maddening to roll back component versions and hope that nothing breaks. Developers need a way to  quickly  determine if
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