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The Hacker News - Cybersecurity News and Analysis: Smart Contract

SAILFISH System to Find State-Inconsistency Bugs in Smart Contracts

SAILFISH System to Find State-Inconsistency Bugs in Smart Contracts

January 04, 2022Ravie Lakshmanan
A group of academics from the University of California, Santa Barbara, has demonstrated what it calls a "scalable technique" to vet smart contracts and mitigate state-inconsistency bugs, discovering 47 zero-day vulnerabilities on the Ethereum blockchain in the process. Smart contracts are  programs  stored on the blockchain that are automatically executed when predetermined conditions are met based on the encoded terms of the agreement. They allow trusted transactions and agreements to be carried out between anonymous parties without the need for a central authority. In other words, the code itself is meant to be the final arbiter of "the deal" it represents, with the program controlling all aspects of the execution, and providing an immutable evidentiary audit trail of transactions that are both trackable and irreversible. This also means that vulnerabilities in the code could result in hefty losses, as evidenced by hacks aimed at  the DAO  and more recently, 
Critical RCE Flaw Discovered in Blockchain-Based EOS Smart Contract System

Critical RCE Flaw Discovered in Blockchain-Based EOS Smart Contract System

May 29, 2018Swati Khandelwal
Security researchers have discovered a series of new vulnerabilities in EOS blockchain platform, one of which could allow remote hackers to take complete control over the node servers running the critical blockchain-based applications. EOS is an open source smart contract platform, known as 'Blockchain 3.0,' that allows developers to build decentralized applications over blockchain infrastructure, just like Ethereum. Discovered by Chinese security researchers at Qihoo 360 —Yuki Chen of Vulcan team and Zhiniang Peng of Core security team—the vulnerability is a buffer out-of-bounds write issue which resides in the function used by nodes server to parse contracts. To achieve remote code execution on a targeted node, all an attacker needs to do is upload a maliciously crafted WASM file (a smart contract) written in WebAssembly to the server. As soon as the vulnerable process parser reads the WASM file, the malicious payload gets executed on the node, which could then al
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