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The Hacker News - Cybersecurity News and Analysis: How to Hack Facebook

How to Hack Facebook Accounts? Just Ask Your Targets to Open a Link

How to Hack Facebook Accounts? Just Ask Your Targets to Open a Link
February 18, 2019Mohit Kumar
It's 2019, and just clicking on a specially crafted URL would have allowed an attacker to hack your Facebook account without any further interaction. A security researcher discovered a critical cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in the most popular social media platform that could have been allowed attackers to hijack Facebook accounts by simply tricking the targeted users into clicking on a link. The researcher, who goes by the online alias "Samm0uda," discovered the vulnerability after he spotted a flawed endpoint (facebook.com/comet/dialog_DONOTUSE/) that could have been exploited to bypass CSRF protections and takeover victim's account. "This is possible because of a vulnerable endpoint which takes another given Facebook endpoint selected by the attacker along with the parameters and makes a POST request to that endpoint after adding the fb_dtsg parameter," the researcher says on his blog . "Also this endpoint is located under t

New Facebook Bug Exposed 6.8 Million Users Photos to Third-Party Apps

New Facebook Bug Exposed 6.8 Million Users Photos to Third-Party Apps
December 14, 2018Mohit Kumar
Facebook's latest screw-up — a programming bug in Facebook website accidentally gave 1,500 third-party apps access to the unposted Facebook photos of as many as 6.8 million users. Facebook today quietly announced that it discovered a new API bug in its photo-sharing system that let 876 developers access users' private photos which they never shared on their timeline, including images uploaded to Marketplace or Facebook Stories. "When someone gives permission for an app to access their photos on Facebook, we usually only grant the app access to photos people share on their timeline. In this case, the bug potentially gave developers access to other photos, such as those shared on Marketplace or Facebook Stories," Facebook said. What's worse? The bug even exposed photos that people uploaded to Facebook but chose not to post or didn't finish posting it for some reason. The flaw left users' private data exposed for 12 days, between September 13th an

Get paid up to $40,000 for finding ways to hack Facebook or Instagram accounts

Get paid up to $40,000 for finding ways to hack Facebook or Instagram accounts
November 21, 2018Mohit Kumar
Here we have great news for all bug bounty hunters. Now you can get paid up to $40,000 for finding and responsibly reporting critical vulnerabilities in the websites and mobile applications owned by Facebook that could allow cyber attackers to take over user accounts. In the latest post published Tuesday on the Facebook page, the social networking giant announced that it has raised the monetary reward for account takeover vulnerabilities to encourage security researchers and bug bounty hunters in helping Facebook to fix high impact issues before nefarious hackers exploit them. The announcement says: Cybersecurity researchers who find security vulnerabilities in any products owned by Facebook , including Instagram , WhatsApp , and Oculus , that can lead to a full account takeover, including access tokens leakage or the ability to access users' valid sessions, will be rewarded an average bounty of: $40,000 reward—if user interaction is not required at all $25,000 reward—

30 Million Facebook Accounts Were Hacked: Check If You're One of Them

30 Million Facebook Accounts Were Hacked: Check If You're One of Them
October 13, 2018Swati Khandelwal
Late last month Facebook announced its worst-ever security breach that allowed an unknown group of hackers to steal secret access tokens for millions of accounts by taking advantage of a flaw in the 'View As' feature. At the time of the initial disclosure, Facebook estimated that the number of users affected by the breach could have been around 50 million, though a new update published today by the social media giant downgraded this number to 30 million. Out of those 30 million accounts, hackers successfully accessed personal information from 29 million Facebook users, though the company assured that the miscreants apparently didn't manage to access any third-party app data . Here's How Facebook Classified the Stolen Data: Facebook vice president of product management Guy Rosen published a new blog post  Friday morning to share further details on the massive security breach, informing that the hackers stole data from those affected accounts, as follows: For about 1

Facebook Hacked — 10 Important Updates You Need To Know About

Facebook Hacked — 10 Important Updates You Need To Know About
September 29, 2018Swati Khandelwal
If you also found yourself logged out of Facebook on Friday, you are not alone. Facebook forced more than 90 million users to log out and back into their accounts in response to a massive data breach. On Friday afternoon, the social media giant disclosed that some unknown hackers managed to exploit three vulnerabilities in its website and steal data from 50 million users and that as a precaution, the company reset access tokens for nearly 90 million Facebook users. We covered a story yesterday based upon the information available at that time. Facebook Hack: 10 Important Updates You Need To Know About However, in a conference call [ Transcript 1 , Transcript 2 ] with reporters, Facebook vice president of product Guy Rosen shared a few more details of the terrible breach, which is believed to be the most significant security blunder in Facebook's history. Here's below we have briefed the new developments in the Facebook data breach incident that you need to know abo

Hackers Stole 50 Million Facebook Users' Access Tokens Using Zero-Day Flaw

Hackers Stole 50 Million Facebook Users' Access Tokens Using Zero-Day Flaw
September 28, 2018Swati Khandelwal
Logged out from your Facebook account automatically? Well you're not alone… Facebook just admitted that an unknown hacker or a group of hackers exploited a zero-day vulnerability in its social media platform that allowed them to steal secret access tokens for more than 50 million accounts. UPDATE:  10 Important Updates You Need To Know About the Latest Facebook Hacking Incident . In a brief blog post published Friday, Facebook revealed that its security team discovered the attack three days ago (on 25 September) and they are still investigating the security incident. The vulnerability, whose technical details has yet not been disclosed and now patched by Facebook, resided in the "View As" feature—an option that allows users to find out what other Facebook users would see if they visit your profile. According to the social media giant, the vulnerability allowed hackers to steal secret access tokens that could then be used to directly access users' private in

Chrome Bug Allowed Hackers to Find Out Everything Facebook Knows About You

Chrome Bug Allowed Hackers to Find Out Everything Facebook Knows About You
August 16, 2018Mohit Kumar
With the release of Chrome 68, Google prominently marks all non-HTTPS websites as 'Not Secure' on its browser to make the web a more secure place for Internet users. If you haven't yet, there is another significant reason to immediately switch to the latest version of the Chrome web browser. Ron Masas, a security researcher from Imperva, has discovered a vulnerability in web browsers that could allow attackers to find everything other web platforms, like Facebook and Google, knows about you—and all they need is just trick you into visiting a website. The vulnerability, identified as CVE-2018-6177 , takes advantage of a weakness in audio/video HTML tags and affects all web browsers powered by "Blink Engine," including Google Chrome. To illustrate the attack scenario, the researcher took an example of Facebook, a popular social media platform that collects in-depth profiling information on its users, including their age, gender, where you have been (loca

A New Cryptocurrency Mining Virus is Spreading Through Facebook

A New Cryptocurrency Mining Virus is Spreading Through Facebook
May 01, 2018Swati Khandelwal
If you receive a link for a video, even if it looks exciting, sent by someone (or your friend) on Facebook messenger—just don't click on it without taking a second thought. Cybersecurity researchers from Trend Micro are warning users of a malicious Chrome extension which is spreading through Facebook Messenger and targeting users of cryptocurrency trading platforms to steal their accounts' credentials. Dubbed FacexWorm , the attack technique used by the malicious extension first emerged in August last year, but researchers noticed the malware re-packed a few new malicious capabilities earlier this month. New capabilities include stealing account credentials from websites, like Google and cryptocurrency sites, redirecting victims to cryptocurrency scams, injecting miners on the web page for mining cryptocurrency, and redirecting victims to the attacker's referral link for cryptocurrency-related referral programs. It is not the first malware to abuse Facebook Messenger

Facebook Password Stealing Apps Found on Android Play Store

Facebook Password Stealing Apps Found on Android Play Store
January 18, 2018Swati Khandelwal
Even after many efforts made by Google last year, malicious apps always somehow manage to make their ways into Google app store. Security researchers have now discovered a new piece of malware, dubbed GhostTeam , in at least 56 applications on Google Play Store that is designed to steal Facebook login credentials and aggressively display pop-up advertisements to users. Discovered independently by two cybersecurity firms, Trend Micro and Avast , the malicious apps disguise as various utility (such as the flashlight, QR code scanner, and compass), performance-boosting (like file-transfer and cleaner), entertainment, lifestyle and video downloader apps. Like most malware apps, these Android apps themselves don't contain any malicious code, which is why they managed to end up on Google's official Play Store. Once installed, it first confirms if the device is not an emulator or a virtual environment and then accordingly downloads the malware payload, which prompts the victim to

Beware of Cryptocurrency Mining Virus Spreading Through Facebook Messenger

Beware of Cryptocurrency Mining Virus Spreading Through Facebook Messenger
December 22, 2017Swati Khandelwal
If you receive a video file ( packed in zip archive ) sent by someone ( or your friends ) on your Facebook messenger — just don't click on it. Researchers from security firm Trend Micro are warning users of a new cryptocurrency mining bot which is spreading through Facebook Messenger and targeting Google Chrome desktop users to take advantage of the recent surge in cryptocurrency prices. Dubbed Digmine , the Monero-cryptocurrency mining bot disguises as a non-embedded video file, under the name "video_xxxx.zip" (as shown in the screenshot), but is actually contains an AutoIt executable script. Once clicked, the malware infects victim's computer and downloads its components and related configuration files from a remote command-and-control (C&C) server. Digimine primarily installs a cryptocurrency miner, i.e.  miner.exe—a modified version of an open-source Monero miner known as XMRig —which silently mines the Monero cryptocurrency in the background for h

Another Facebook Bug Allowed Anyone to Delete Your Photos

Another Facebook Bug Allowed Anyone to Delete Your Photos
November 27, 2017Swati Khandelwal
If you think a website whose value is more than $500 billion does not have any vulnerability in it, then you are wrong. Pouya Darabi, an Iranian web developer, discovered and reported a critical yet straightforward vulnerability in Facebook earlier this month that could have allowed anyone to delete any photo from the social media platform. The vulnerability resides in Facebook's new Poll feature, launched by the social media giant earlier this month, for posting polls that include images and GIF animations. Darabi analyzed the feature and found that when creating a new poll, anyone can easily replace the image ID (or gif URL) in the request sent to the Facebook server with the image ID of any photo on the social media network. Now, after sending the request with another user image ID (uploaded by someone else), that photo would appear in the poll. "Whenever a user tries to create a poll, a request containing gif URL or image id will be sent, poll_question_data[

Scam Alert: Your Trusted Friends Can Hack Your Facebook Account

Scam Alert: Your Trusted Friends Can Hack Your Facebook Account
October 13, 2017Mohit Kumar
If you receive a message from any of your Facebook Friends asking for urgent help to recover their Facebook account, since they've added you as one of their ' Trusted Contacts '—just don't blindly believe it. Researchers have detected a new Facebook phishing scam that can even trick an experienced technical user into falling victim to the scam, helping an attacker gain access to your Facebook account. This latest social media scam is abusing "Trusted Contact"—a Facebook account recovery feature that sends secret access codes to a few of your close friends in order to help you regain access to your Facebook account in case you forget your password or lost access to your account. According to a public security alert published by AccessNow, the attack initiates by an already compromised account of one of your friends, asking for urgent help to get back into his/her Facebook account. The attacker explains that you are listed as one of his/her Trusted Conta

Facebook Unveils 'Delegated Recovery' to Replace Traditional Password Recovery Methods

Facebook Unveils 'Delegated Recovery' to Replace Traditional Password Recovery Methods
January 31, 2017Mohit Kumar
How do you reset the password for your Facebook account if your primary email account also gets hacked? Using SMS-based security code or maybe answering the security questions? Well, it's 2017, and we are still forced to depend on insecure and unreliable password reset schemes like email-based or SMS code verification process. But these traditional access recovery mechanisms aren't safe enough to protect our all other online accounts linked to an email account. Yahoo Mail can be used as an excellent example. Once hackers have access to your Yahoo account, they can also get into any of your other online accounts linked to the same email just by clicking the link that says, "Forgot your password?" Fortunately, Facebook has a tool that aims to fix this process, helping you recover access to all your other online accounts securely. At the Enigma Conference in Oakland, California on Monday, Facebook launched an account recovery feature for other websites

Facebook Adds FIDO U2F Security Keys Feature For Secure Logins

Facebook Adds FIDO U2F Security Keys Feature For Secure Logins
January 27, 2017Mohit Kumar
Hacking password for a Facebook account is not easy, but also not impossible. We have always been advising you to enable two-factor authentication — or 2FA — to secure your online accounts, a process that requires users to manually enter, typically a six-digit secret code generated by an authenticator app or received via SMS or email. So even if somehow hackers steal your login credentials, they would not be able to access your account without one-time password sent to you. But, Are SMS-based one-time passwords Secure? US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is also no longer recommending SMS-based two-factor authentication systems , and it's not a reliable solution mainly because of two reasons: Users outside the network coverage can face issues Growing number of sophisticated attacks against OTP schemes So, to beef up the security of your account, Facebook now support Fido-compliant Universal 2nd Factor Authentication (U2F), allows users to log into

This Bug Could Allow Hackers to Delete Any Video On Facebook

This Bug Could Allow Hackers to Delete Any Video On Facebook
January 23, 2017Mohit Kumar
A security researcher has discovered a critical vulnerability in Facebook that could allow attackers to delete any video of the social networking site shared by anyone on their wall. The flaw has been discovered by security researcher Dan Melamed in June 2016, allowing him not only to remotely delete any video on Facebook shared by anyone without having any permission or authentication but also to disable commenting on the video of your choice. Here's how to exploit this flaw: In order to exploit this vulnerability, Melamed first created a public event on the Facebook page and uploaded a video on the Discussion part of the event. While uploading the video, the researcher tampered the POST request using Fiddler and then replace the Video ID value of his video with Video ID value of any other video on the social media platform. Although Facebook responded to this issue with a server error, i.e. " This content is no longer available, " but the new video was s

Simple Bug allows Hackers to Read all your Private Facebook Messenger Chats

Simple Bug allows Hackers to Read all your Private Facebook Messenger Chats
December 14, 2016Mohit Kumar
A security researcher has discovered a critical vulnerability in Facebook Messenger that could allow an attacker to read all your private conversation, affecting the privacy of around 1 Billion Messenger users. Ysrael Gurt, the security researcher at BugSec and Cynet, reported a cross-origin bypass-attack against Facebook Messenger which allows an attacker to access your private messages, photos as well as attachments sent on the Facebook chat. To exploit this vulnerability, all an attacker need is to trick a victim into visiting a malicious website; that's all. Once clicked, all private conversations by the victim, whether from a Facebook's mobile app or a web browser, would be accessible to the attacker, because the flaw affected both the web chat as well as the mobile application. Dubbed " Originull ," the vulnerability actually lies in the fact that Facebook chats are managed from a server located at {number}-edge-chat.facebook.com, which is separate from

Beware! Malicious JPG Images on Facebook Messenger Spreading Locky Ransomware

Beware! Malicious JPG Images on Facebook Messenger Spreading Locky Ransomware
November 25, 2016Swati Khandelwal
If you receive an image file sent by someone, even your friend, on your Facebook Messenger, LinkedIn or any other social media platform, just DO NOT CLICK ON IT. Even JPG image file could eventually infect your computer with the infamous Locky Ransomware . Earlier this week, we reported a new attack campaign that used Facebook Messenger to spread Locky Ransomware via .SVG image files, although Facebook denied this was the case. Now, researchers have discovered that the ongoing spam campaign is also using boobytrapped .JPG image files in order to download and infect users with the Locky Ransomware via Facebook, LinkedIn, and other social networking platforms. Security researchers from Israeli security firm Check Point have reportedly discovered how cyber criminals are hiding malware in image files, and how they are executing the malware code within these images to infect social media users with Locky variants. According to researchers, malware authors have discovered secu

Facebook Buys Leaked Passwords From Black Market, But Do You Know Why?

Facebook Buys Leaked Passwords From Black Market, But Do You Know Why?
November 10, 2016Mohit Kumar
Facebook is reportedly buying stolen passwords that hackers are selling on the underground black market in an effort to keep its users' accounts safe. On the one hand, we just came to know that Yahoo did not inform its users of the recently disclosed major 2014 hacking incident that exposed half a billion user accounts even after being aware of the hack in 2014. On the other hand, Facebook takes every single measure to protect its users' security even after the company managed to avoid any kind of security scandal, data breach or hacks that have recently affected top notch companies. Speaking at the Web Summit 2016 technology conference in Portugal, Facebook CSO Alex Stamos said that over 1.3 Billion people use Facebook every day, and keeping them secure is building attack-proof software to keep out hackers, but keeping them safe is actually a huge task. Stamos said there is a difference between 'security' and 'safety,' as he believes that his team

Hacker reveals How He Could have Hacked Multiple Facebook Accounts

Hacker reveals How He Could have Hacked Multiple Facebook Accounts
August 27, 2016Swati Khandelwal
How to Hack a Facebook Account? That's possibly the most frequently asked question on the Internet today. Though the solution is hard to find, a white hat hacker has just proven how easy it is to hack multiple Facebook accounts with some basic computer skills. Your Facebook account can be hacked, no matter how strong your password is or how much extra security measures you have taken. No joke! Gurkirat Singh from California recently discovered a loophole in Facebook's password reset mechanism that could have given hackers complete access to the victim's Facebook account, allowing them to view message conversations and payment card details, post anything and do whatever the real account holder can. The attack vector is simple, though the execution is quite difficult. The issue, Gurkirat ( @GurkiratSpeca ) says, actually resides in the way Facebook allows you to reset your password. The social network uses an algorithm that generates a random 6-digit passcode ‒
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