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The Hacker News - Cybersecurity News and Analysis: Hack In the Box conference

Hackers Probably Can't Hijack an Airplane with Software

Hackers Probably Can't Hijack an Airplane with Software

April 12, 2013Wang Wei
An alarming dispatch from the Hack In The Box security conference in Amsterdam arrived on Wednesday: a hacker says he's found a way to take over airplane controls . That's probably not true. At least according to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the European Aviation Safety Administration (EASA) and Honeywell, the maker's of the cockpit software, it's not. The FAA, for one, says, " The described technique cannot engage or control the aircraft's autopilot system using the FMS or prevent a pilot from overriding the autopilot. " The agency assures America that this hack " does not pose a flight safety concern because it does not work on certified flight hardware. " So why did Hugo Teso, the German hacker in question, tell everybody at the conference as well as countless journalists who've latched on to the story that he could take over the software? Well, Teso says he's successfully taken over a plane's controls in a flight
‘Pinkie Pie’ discovered second Chrome exploit worth $60k at Pwnium 2

'Pinkie Pie' discovered second Chrome exploit worth $60k at Pwnium 2

October 10, 2012Mohit Kumar
Hacker known as " Pinkie Pie " produced the first Chrome vulnerability at the Hack In the Box conference on Wednesday, just ahead of the deadline for the competition this afternoon. The exploit, if later confirmed by Google's US headquarters, will have earned the teenage hacker known as Pinkie Pie the top US$60,000 cash reward. In March, Pinkie Pie and Sergey Glazunov both won $60,000 for their exploits at the first Pwnium competition. Google established the Pwnium competition as an alternative to the Pwn2own contest in order to add the requirement that participants provide details of their exploit. Google will give away up to a total of US$2 million during the event. $60,000 - "Full Chrome exploit": Chrome / Win7 local OS user account persistence using only bugs in Chrome itself. $40,000 - "Partial Chrome exploit": Chrome / Win7 local OS user account persistence using at least one bug in Chrome itself, plus other bugs. For example, a WebKit bug combined with a Windows
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