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The Hacker News - Cybersecurity News and Analysis: Apple Airdrop

Apple AirDrop Bug Could Leak Your Personal Info to Anyone Nearby

Apple AirDrop Bug Could Leak Your Personal Info to Anyone Nearby

April 26, 2021Ravie Lakshmanan
New research has uncovered privacy weaknesses in Apple's wireless file-sharing protocol that could result in the exposure of a user's contact information such as email addresses and phone numbers. "As an attacker, it is possible to learn the phone numbers and email addresses of AirDrop users – even as a complete stranger,"  said  a team of academics from the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany. "All they require is a Wi-Fi-capable device and physical proximity to a target that initiates the discovery process by opening the sharing pane on an iOS or macOS device." AirDrop  is a proprietary ad hoc service present in Apple's iOS and macOS operating systems, allowing users to transfer files between devices by making use of close-range wireless communication. While this feature shows only receiver devices that are in users' contact lists by an authentication mechanism that compares an individual's phone number and email address with entrie
AirDrop Bug in Apple iOS and OSX allows Hackers to Install Malware Silently

AirDrop Bug in Apple iOS and OSX allows Hackers to Install Malware Silently

September 16, 2015Swati Khandelwal
With the launch of iOS 9, Apple gave us an ultimate reason to upgrade our Apple devices to its new operating system. The latest iOS 9 includes a security update for a nasty bug that could be exploited to take full control of your iPhone or Macs, forcing most of the Apple users to download the latest update. Australian security researcher Mark Dowd has disclosed a serious vulnerability in AirDrop , Apple's over-the-air file sharing service built into iOS and Mac OS X. How the Attack Works? The vulnerability allows anyone within the range of an AirDrop user to silently install a malicious app on a target Apple device by sending an AirDrop file which involves rebooting of the target device. An attacker can exploit this critical bug even if the victim rejects the incoming file sent over AirDrop. After rebooting takes place, the malicious app gains access to Springboard, Apple's software to manage iOS home screen, allowing the app to fool the victim's iP
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