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Meeting Patching-Related Compliance Requirements with TuxCare

Meeting Patching-Related Compliance Requirements with TuxCare

January 13, 2022The Hacker News
Cybersecurity teams have many demands competing for limited resources. Restricted budgets are a problem, and restricted staff resources are also a bottleneck. There is also the need to maintain business continuity at all times. It's a frustrating mix of challenges – with resources behind tasks such as patching rarely sufficient to meet security prerogatives or compliance deadlines. The multitude of different security-related standards have ever stringent deadlines, and it is often the case that business needs don't necessarily align with those requirements. At the core of what TuxCare does is automated live patching – a way to consistently keep critical services safe from security threats, without the need to expend significant resources in doing so, or the need to live with business disruption. In this article, we'll outline how  TuxCare  helps organizations such as yours deal better with security challenges including patching, and the support of end-of-life operating s
New SysJoker Espionage Malware Targeting Windows, macOS, and Linux Users

New SysJoker Espionage Malware Targeting Windows, macOS, and Linux Users

January 12, 2022Ravie Lakshmanan
A new  cross-platform backdoor  called " SysJoker " has been observed targeting machines running Windows, Linux, and macOS operating systems as part of an ongoing espionage campaign that's believed to have been initiated during the second half of 2021. "SysJoker masquerades as a system update and generates its [command-and-control server] by decoding a string retrieved from a text file hosted on Google Drive," Intezer researchers Avigayil Mechtinger, Ryan Robinson, and Nicole Fishbein  noted  in a technical write-up publicizing their findings. "Based on victimology and malware's behavior, we assess that SysJoker is after specific targets." The Israeli cybersecurity company, attributing the work to an advanced threat actor, said it first discovered evidence of the implant in December 2021 during an active attack against a Linux-based web server belonging to an unnamed educational institution. A C++-based malware, SysJoker is delivered via a dr
Why Everyone Needs to Take the Latest CISA Directive Seriously

Why Everyone Needs to Take the Latest CISA Directive Seriously

December 03, 2021The Hacker News
Government agencies publish notices and directives all the time. Usually, these are only relevant to government departments, which means that nobody else really pays attention. It's easy to see why you would assume that a directive from CISA just doesn't relate to your organization. But, in the instance of the latest CISA directive, that would be making a mistake. In this article, we explain why, even if you're in the private or non-government sector, you should nonetheless take a close look at CISA Binding Operational Directive 22-01. We outline why CISA was forced to issue this directive, and why that firm action has implications for all organizations – inside and outside of government. Acting on cybersecurity issues isn't as simple as flicking a switch, of course, so keep reading to find out how you can address the core issue behind the CISA directive. Okay, so what exactly is a CISA directive? Let's take a step back to gain some context. Just like any organ
New Payment Data Stealing Malware Hides in Nginx Process on Linux Servers

New Payment Data Stealing Malware Hides in Nginx Process on Linux Servers

December 03, 2021Ravie Lakshmanan
E-commerce platforms in the U.S., Germany, and France have come under attack from a new form of malware that targets Nginx servers in an attempt to masquerade its presence and slip past detection by security solutions. "This novel code injects itself into a host Nginx application and is nearly invisible," Sansec Threat Research team  said  in a new report. "The parasite is used to steal data from eCommerce servers, also known as 'server-side Magecart.'"  A free and open-source software, Nginx is a web server that can also be used as a reverse proxy, load balancer, mail proxy, and HTTP cache. NginRAT, as the advanced malware is called, works by hijacking a host Nginx application to embed itself into the webserver process. The remote access trojan itself is delivered via  CronRAT , another piece of malware the Dutch cybersecurity firm disclosed last week as hiding its malicious payloads in cron jobs scheduled to execute on February 31st, a non-existent ca
CronRAT: A New Linux Malware That’s Scheduled to Run on February 31st

CronRAT: A New Linux Malware That's Scheduled to Run on February 31st

November 26, 2021Ravie Lakshmanan
Researchers have unearthed a new remote access trojan (RAT) for Linux that employs a never-before-seen stealth technique that involves masking its malicious actions by scheduling them for execution on February 31st, a non-existent calendar day. Dubbed CronRAT, the sneaky malware "enables  server-side Magecart data theft  which bypasses browser-based security solutions," Sansec Threat Research said. The Dutch cybersecurity firm said it found samples of the RAT on several online stores, including an unnamed country's largest outlet. CronRAT's standout feature is its ability to leverage the  cron  job-scheduler utility for Unix to hide malicious payloads using task names programmed to execute on February 31st. Not only does this allow the malware to evade detection from security software, but it also enables it to launch an array of attack commands that could put Linux eCommerce servers at risk. "The CronRAT adds a number of tasks to crontab with a curious date
New Golang-based Linux Malware Targeting eCommerce Websites

New Golang-based Linux Malware Targeting eCommerce Websites

November 22, 2021Ravie Lakshmanan
Weaknesses in e-commerce portals are being exploited to deploy a Linux backdoor as well as a credit card skimmer that's capable of stealing payment information from compromised websites. "The attacker started with automated e-commerce attack probes, testing for dozens of weaknesses in common online store platforms," researchers from Sansec Threat Research  said  in an analysis. "After a day and a half, the attacker found a file upload vulnerability in one of the store's plugins." The name of the affected vendor was not revealed. The initial foothold was then leveraged to upload a malicious web shell and alter the server code to siphon customer data. Additionally, the attacker delivered a Golang-based malware called " linux_avp " that serves as a backdoor to execute commands remotely sent from a command-and-control server hosted in Beijing. Upon execution, the program is designed to remove itself from the disk and camouflage as a " ps -ef
Abcbot — A New Evolving Wormable Botnet Malware Targeting Linux

Abcbot — A New Evolving Wormable Botnet Malware Targeting Linux

November 11, 2021Ravie Lakshmanan
Researchers from Qihoo 360's Netlab security team have released details of a new evolving botnet called " Abcbot " that has been observed in the wild with worm-like propagation features to infect Linux systems and launch distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks against targets. While the earliest version of the botnet dates back to July 2021, new variants observed as recently as October 30 have been equipped with additional updates to strike Linux web servers with weak passwords and are susceptible to N-day vulnerabilities, including a custom implementation of DDoS functionality, indicating that the malware is under continuous development. Netlab's findings also build on a report from Trend Micro early last month, which  publicized  attacks targeting Huawei Cloud with cryptocurrency-mining and cryptojacking malware. The intrusions were also notable for the fact that the malicious shell scripts specifically disabled a process designed to monitor and scan the ser
14 New Security Flaws Found in BusyBox Linux Utility for Embedded Devices

14 New Security Flaws Found in BusyBox Linux Utility for Embedded Devices

November 10, 2021Ravie Lakshmanan
Cybersecurity researchers on Tuesday disclosed 14 critical vulnerabilities in the BusyBox Linux utility that could be exploited to result in a denial-of-service (DoS) condition and, in select cases, even lead to information leaks and remote code execution. The security weaknesses, tracked from CVE-2021-42373 through CVE-2021-42386, affect multiple versions of the tool ranging from 1.16-1.33.1, DevOps company JFrog and industrial cybersecurity company Claroty  said  in a joint report. Dubbed "the Swiss Army Knife of Embedded Linux,"  BusyBox  is a widely used software suite combining a variety of common Unix utilities or applets (e.g.,  cp ,  ls ,  grep ) into a single executable file that can run on Linux systems such as programmable logic controllers (PLCs), human-machine interfaces (HMIs), and remote terminal units (RTUs). A quick list of the flaws and the applets they impact is below — man  - CVE-2021-42373 lzma/unlzma  - CVE-2021-42374 ash  - CVE-2021-42375 hus
Critical RCE Vulnerability Reported in Linux Kernel's TIPC Module

Critical RCE Vulnerability Reported in Linux Kernel's TIPC Module

November 04, 2021Ravie Lakshmanan
Cybersecurity researchers have disclosed a security flaw in the Linux Kernel's Transparent Inter Process Communication ( TIPC ) module that could potentially be leveraged both locally as well as remotely to execute arbitrary code within the kernel and take control of vulnerable machines. Tracked as CVE-2021-43267 (CVSS score: 9.8), the heap overflow vulnerability "can be exploited locally or remotely within a network to gain kernel privileges, and would allow an attacker to compromise the entire system," cybersecurity firm SentinelOne  said  in a report published today and shared with The Hacker News. TIPC is a transport layer  protocol   designed  for nodes running in dynamic cluster environments to reliably communicate with each other in a manner that's more efficient and fault-tolerant than other protocols such as TCP. The vulnerability identified by SentinelOne has to do with insufficient validation of user-supplied sizes for a new message type called "
Google to Pay Hackers $31,337 for Exploiting Patched Linux Kernel Flaws

Google to Pay Hackers $31,337 for Exploiting Patched Linux Kernel Flaws

November 02, 2021Ravie Lakshmanan
Google on Monday announced that it will pay security researchers to find exploits using vulnerabilities, previously remediated or otherwise, over the next three months as part of a new bug bounty program to improve the security of the Linux kernel. To that end, the company is expected to issue rewards worth $31,337 (a reference to Leet ) for exploiting privilege escalation in a lab environment for each patched vulnerability, an amount that can climb up to $50,337 for working exploits that take advantage of zero-day flaws in the kernel and other undocumented attack techniques. Specifically, the program aims to uncover attacks that could be launched against Kubernetes-based infrastructure to defeat process isolation barriers (via NSJail) and break out of the sandbox to leak secret information. The program is expected to last until January 31, 2022. "It is important to note, that the easiest exploitation primitives are not available in our lab environment due to the hardening
Winter is Coming for CentOS 8

Winter is Coming for CentOS 8

October 29, 2021The Hacker News
Winter is Coming for CentOS 8—but here is how you can enjoy your holidays after all. The server environment is complex and if you're managing thousands of Linux servers, the last thing you want is for an operating system vendor to do something completely unexpected. That is exactly what Red Hat, the parent company of the CentOS Project, did when it suddenly announced a  curtailment of support for CentOS 8  – sending thousands of organizations scrambling for an alternative. In this article, we'll review what happened with CentOS 8 and what it means for users who have already upgraded from CentOS release 7 to release 8. We'll also look at your alternatives for replacing CentOS 8. Finally, we'll do a review of your other option: choosing extended support. Extended lifecycle support (ELS) can reduce the pressure to decide on alternative distribution and it may well be the most practical route for many CentOS 8 users. Official support is critical The difficulties arou
Why Database Patching Best Practice Just Doesn't Work and How to Fix It

Why Database Patching Best Practice Just Doesn't Work and How to Fix It

October 18, 2021The Hacker News
Patching really, really matters – patching is what keeps technology solutions from becoming like big blocks of Swiss cheese, with endless security vulnerabilities punching hole after hole into critical solutions. But anyone who's spent any amount of time maintaining systems will know that patching is often easier said than done. Yes, in some instances, you can just run a command line to install that patch, and that's it. These instances are increasingly rare though – given the complexity of the technology environment, you're more likely faced with a complex process to achieve patching best practice. In this article, we'll outline why database patching matters (yes, databases are vulnerable too!), explain what the problem is with patching databases, and point to a novel solution that takes the pain out of database patching. Watch out – your database services are vulnerable too We know that database services are critical – databases underpin IT operations in countle
Windows 10, Linux, iOS, Chrome and Many Others at Hacked Tianfu Cup 2021

Windows 10, Linux, iOS, Chrome and Many Others at Hacked Tianfu Cup 2021

October 17, 2021Ravie Lakshmanan
Windows 10, iOS 15, Google Chrome, Apple Safari, Microsoft Exchange Server, and Ubuntu 20 were successfully broken into using original, never-before-seen exploits at the Tianfu Cup 2021, the fourth edition of the international cybersecurity contest held in the city of Chengdu, China. Targets this year  included  Google Chrome running on Windows 10 21H1, Apple Safari running on Macbook Pro, Adobe PDF Reader, Docker CE, Ubuntu 20/CentOS 8, Microsoft Exchange Server 2019, Windows 10, VMware Workstation, VMware ESXi, Parallels Desktop, iPhone 13 Pro running iOS 15, domestic mobile phones running Android, QEMU VM, Synology DS220j DiskStation, and ASUS RT-AX56U router. The Chinese version of Pwn2Own was  started  in 2018 in the wake of government regulation in the country that barred security researchers from participating in international hacking competitions because of national security concerns. With the exception of Synology DS220j NAS, Xiaomi Mi 11 smartphone, and an unnamed Chine
Researchers Warn of FontOnLake Rootkit Malware Targeting Linux Systems

Researchers Warn of FontOnLake Rootkit Malware Targeting Linux Systems

October 08, 2021Ravie Lakshmanan
Cybersecurity researchers have detailed a new campaign that likely targets entities in Southeast Asia with a previously unrecognized Linux malware that's engineered to enable remote access to its operators, in addition to amassing credentials and function as a proxy server. The malware family, dubbed " FontOnLake " by Slovak cybersecurity firm ESET, is said to feature "well-designed modules" that are continuously being upgraded with a broad range of abilities, indicating an active development phase. Samples uploaded to VirusTotal point to the possibility that the very first intrusions utilizing this threat have been happening as early as May 2020. Avast  and  Lacework Labs  are tracking the same malware under the moniker HCRootkit. "The sneaky nature of FontOnLake's tools in combination with advanced design and low prevalence suggest that they are used in targeted attacks," ESET researcher Vladislav Hrčka  said . "To collect data or condu
Why You Should Consider QEMU Live Patching

Why You Should Consider QEMU Live Patching

September 23, 2021The Hacker News
Sysadmins know what the risks are of running unpatched services. Given the choice, and unlimited resources, most hardworking administrators will ensure that all systems and services are patched consistently. But things are rarely that simple. Technical resources are limited, and patching can often be more complicated than it appears at first glance. Worse, some services are so hidden in the background, that they just don't make it onto the list of things to be patched. QEMU is one of those services that tend to create difficulties with patching. It works away in the background and is easy to take for granted. Plus, patching QEMU involves significant technical and practical challenges – while requiring enormous resources. In this article, we'll address some of the difficulties around patching QEMU, and point to a solution that takes the toughest bits out of QEMU patching. Ignoring QEMU patching is a big risk You'll probably know about it if you're using QEMU – shor
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