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Google Settles $5 Billion Privacy Lawsuit Over Tracking Users in 'Incognito Mode'

Google Settles $5 Billion Privacy Lawsuit Over Tracking Users in 'Incognito Mode'
Jan 02, 2024 Data Privacy / Online Tracking
Google has agreed to settle a lawsuit  filed in June 2020  that alleged that the company misled users by tracking their surfing activity who thought that their internet use remained private when using the "incognito" or "private" mode on web browsers. The  class-action lawsuit  sought at least $5 billion in damages. The settlement terms were not disclosed. The plaintiffs had alleged that Google violated federal wiretap laws and  tracked users' activity  using Google Analytics to collect information when in private mode. They said this allowed the company to collect an "unaccountable trove of information" about users who assumed they had taken adequate steps to protect their privacy online. Google subsequently attempted to get the lawsuit dismissed, pointing out the message it displayed when users turned on Chrome's incognito mode, which  informs users  that their activity might still be visible to websites they visit, employer or school, or their internet service provider. It's

United States Sues Edward Snowden and You'd be Surprised to Know Why

United States Sues Edward Snowden and You'd be Surprised to Know Why
Sep 17, 2019
The United States government today filed a lawsuit against Edward Snowden , a former contractor for the CIA and NSA government agencies who made headlines worldwide in 2013 when he fled the country and leaked top-secret information about NSA's global and domestic surveillance activities. And you would be more surprised to know the reason for this lawsuit—No, Snowden has not been sued for leaking NSA secrets, instead for publishing a book without submitting it to the agencies for pre-publication review. In his latest book, titled " Permanent Record " and released today on September 17th, Edward Snowden for the first time revealed the story of his life, including how he helped the agency to built that surveillance system. Permanent Record also details about the aftermath of Snowden decision to disclose hundreds of thousands of sensitive documents exposing the United States mass surveillance programs to the world. According to a press release U.S. Department of J

Code Keepers: Mastering Non-Human Identity Management

Code Keepers: Mastering Non-Human Identity Management
Apr 12, 2024DevSecOps / Identity Management
Identities now transcend human boundaries. Within each line of code and every API call lies a non-human identity. These entities act as programmatic access keys, enabling authentication and facilitating interactions among systems and services, which are essential for every API call, database query, or storage account access. As we depend on multi-factor authentication and passwords to safeguard human identities, a pressing question arises: How do we guarantee the security and integrity of these non-human counterparts? How do we authenticate, authorize, and regulate access for entities devoid of life but crucial for the functioning of critical systems? Let's break it down. The challenge Imagine a cloud-native application as a bustling metropolis of tiny neighborhoods known as microservices, all neatly packed into containers. These microservices function akin to diligent worker bees, each diligently performing its designated task, be it processing data, verifying credentials, or

The Pirate Bay Founder Ordered to Pay $395,000 Fine in Lawsuit he didn't even know about

The Pirate Bay Founder Ordered to Pay $395,000 Fine in Lawsuit he didn't even know about
Jun 17, 2016
One of the founders of notorious file-sharing website The Pirate Bay has been ordered to pay a fine worth nearly US$400,000 to several major record labels after their content was shared illegally via the platform. The penalty has been imposed on The Pirate Bay co-founder Peter Sunde by a court in Helsinki, Finland. Interestingly, Sunde, who already left the notorious file sharing site in 2009, said on Twitter that he lost the court case he did not even know about. The court case was brought by the Finnish divisions of Sony Music, Universal Music, Warner Music and EMI, accusing the Pirate Bay of illegally sharing the music of 60 of their artists through its service. The artists mentioned in the brief included " Juha Tapio, Teräsniska, Chisu, Deniece Williams, Suvi Vesa-Matti Loiri, Michael Monroe, Anna Abreau, Antti Tuisku, and Children of Bodom, " according to the local outlet Digitoday . However, the recording division did not accuse Sunde of direct infringeme

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