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Facebook to Pay $5 Billion Fine to Settle FTC Privacy Investigation

Facebook to Pay $5 Billion Fine to Settle FTC Privacy Investigation
Jul 13, 2019
After months of negotiations, the United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has approved a record $5 billion settlement with Facebook over its privacy investigation into the Cambridge Analytica scandal . The settlement will put an end to a wide-ranging probe that began more than a year ago and centers around the violation of a 2011 agreement Facebook made with the FTC that required Facebook to gain explicit consent from users to share their personal data. The FTC launched an investigation into the social media giant last year after it was revealed that the company allowed Cambridge Analytica access to the personal data of around  87 million Facebook users without their explicit consent. Now, according to a new report published by the Wall Street Journal, the FTC commissioners this week finally voted to approve a $5 billion settlement, with three Republicans voting to approve the deal and two Democrats against it. Facebook anticipated the fine to between $3 billion and

Facebook Mistakenly Stored Millions of Users' Passwords in Plaintext

Facebook Mistakenly Stored Millions of Users' Passwords in Plaintext
Mar 21, 2019
Holy moly, Facebook is again at the center of a new privacy controversy after revealing today that its platform mistakenly kept a copy of passwords for "hundreds of millions" users in plaintext. What's more? Not just Facebook, Instagram users are also affected by the latest security incident. So, if you are one of the affected users, your Facebook or Instagram password was readable to some of the Facebook engineers who have internal access to the servers and the database. Though the social media company did not mention exactly what component or application on its website had the programmatic error that caused the issue, it did reveal that the company discovered the security blunder in January this year during a routine security check. In a blog post published today, Facebook's vice president of engineering Pedro Canahuati said an internal investigation of the incident found no evidence of any Facebook employee abusing those passwords. "To be clear, t

How to Hack Facebook Accounts? Just Ask Your Targets to Open a Link

How to Hack Facebook Accounts? Just Ask Your Targets to Open a Link
Feb 18, 2019
It's 2019, and just clicking on a specially crafted URL would have allowed an attacker to hack your Facebook account without any further interaction. A security researcher discovered a critical cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in the most popular social media platform that could have been allowed attackers to hijack Facebook accounts by simply tricking the targeted users into clicking on a link. The researcher, who goes by the online alias "Samm0uda," discovered the vulnerability after he spotted a flawed endpoint (facebook.com/comet/dialog_DONOTUSE/) that could have been exploited to bypass CSRF protections and takeover victim's account. "This is possible because of a vulnerable endpoint which takes another given Facebook endpoint selected by the attacker along with the parameters and makes a POST request to that endpoint after adding the fb_dtsg parameter," the researcher says on his blog . "Also this endpoint is located under t

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SHQ Response Platform and Risk Centre to Enable Management and Analysts Alike

SHQ Response Platform and Risk Centre to Enable Management and Analysts Alike
May 13, 2024Threat Detection / SoC / SIEM
In the last decade, there has been a growing disconnect between front-line analysts and senior management in IT and Cybersecurity. Well-documented challenges facing modern analysts revolve around a high volume of alerts, false positives, poor visibility of technical environments, and analysts spending too much time on manual tasks. The Impact of Alert Fatigue and False Positives  Analysts are overwhelmed with alerts. The knock-on effect of this is that fatigued analysts are at risk of missing key details in incidents, and often conduct time-consuming triaging tasks manually only to end up copying and pasting a generic closing comment into a false positive alert.  It is likely that there will always be false positives. And many would argue that a false positive is better than a false negative. But for proactive actions to be made, we must move closer to the heart of an incident. That requires diving into how analysts conduct the triage and investigation process. SHQ Response Platfo

Get paid up to $40,000 for finding ways to hack Facebook or Instagram accounts

Get paid up to $40,000 for finding ways to hack Facebook or Instagram accounts
Nov 21, 2018
Here we have great news for all bug bounty hunters. Now you can get paid up to $40,000 for finding and responsibly reporting critical vulnerabilities in the websites and mobile applications owned by Facebook that could allow cyber attackers to take over user accounts. In the latest post published Tuesday on the Facebook page, the social networking giant announced that it has raised the monetary reward for account takeover vulnerabilities to encourage security researchers and bug bounty hunters in helping Facebook to fix high impact issues before nefarious hackers exploit them. The announcement says: Cybersecurity researchers who find security vulnerabilities in any products owned by Facebook , including Instagram , WhatsApp , and Oculus , that can lead to a full account takeover, including access tokens leakage or the ability to access users' valid sessions, will be rewarded an average bounty of: $40,000 reward—if user interaction is not required at all $25,000 reward—

Facebook Password Stealing Apps Found on Android Play Store

Facebook Password Stealing Apps Found on Android Play Store
Jan 18, 2018
Even after many efforts made by Google last year, malicious apps always somehow manage to make their ways into Google app store. Security researchers have now discovered a new piece of malware, dubbed GhostTeam , in at least 56 applications on Google Play Store that is designed to steal Facebook login credentials and aggressively display pop-up advertisements to users. Discovered independently by two cybersecurity firms, Trend Micro and Avast , the malicious apps disguise as various utility (such as the flashlight, QR code scanner, and compass), performance-boosting (like file-transfer and cleaner), entertainment, lifestyle and video downloader apps. Like most malware apps, these Android apps themselves don't contain any malicious code, which is why they managed to end up on Google's official Play Store. Once installed, it first confirms if the device is not an emulator or a virtual environment and then accordingly downloads the malware payload, which prompts the victim to
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