#1 Trusted Cybersecurity News Platform Followed by 4.50+ million
The Hacker News Logo
Get the Free Newsletter
SaaS Security

apple iwatch | Breaking Cybersecurity News | The Hacker News

Apple Opens Its Invite-Only Bug Bounty Program to All Researchers

Apple Opens Its Invite-Only Bug Bounty Program to All Researchers

Dec 20, 2019
As promised by Apple in August this year, the company today finally opened its bug bounty program to all security researchers, offering monetary rewards to anyone for reporting vulnerabilities in the iOS, macOS, watchOS, tvOS, iPadOS, and iCloud to the company. Since its launch three years ago, Apple's bug bounty program was open only for selected security researchers based on invitation and was only rewarded for reporting vulnerabilities in the iOS mobile operating system. However, speaking at a hacking conference in August this year, Ivan Krstić, head of Apple Security Engineering and Architecture at Apple, announced the company's upcoming extended bug bounty program which included three main highlights: an enormous increase in the maximum reward from $200,000 to $1.5 million, accepting bug reports for all of its operating systems and latest hardware, opening the program for all researchers. Now starting from today, all security researchers and hackers are
£300 Apple Watch might not Work If You've Got Wrist Tattoos

£300 Apple Watch might not Work If You've Got Wrist Tattoos

Apr 30, 2015
Credit: mirror.co.uk If you love wearing tattoos and have one on your wrist, then the Apple Watch won't work for you. Yes, you heard that right. Apple watch is unable to figure out your blood pressure or even sense your skin contact if you wear the watch on a tattooed wrist. Generally, the Apple Watch automatically detects your wrist by your measuring your heart's pulse rate. So, you don't need to enter a password every time you put the watch on your wrist. The issue with the Apple Watch: However, the infrared sensors of the Apple Watch that enable wrist detection often fail when encountered by dark ink tattoos or scars. Many users on Twitter and Reddit have complained online that their Apple watches doesn't play nice when worn on a tattooed wrist. The watch's heart rate sensor loses the connection and gives inaccurate readings, even the device fails to detect direct contact with the user's skin, causing apps to shut down and repeatedly as
SaaS Compliance through the NIST Cybersecurity Framework

SaaS Compliance through the NIST Cybersecurity Framework

Feb 20, 2024Cybersecurity Framework / SaaS Security
The US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) cybersecurity framework is one of the world's most important guidelines for securing networks. It can be applied to any number of applications, including SaaS.  One of the challenges facing those tasked with securing SaaS applications is the different settings found in each application. It makes it difficult to develop a configuration policy that will apply to an HR app that manages employees, a marketing app that manages content, and an R&D app that manages software versions, all while aligning with NIST compliance standards.  However, there are several settings that can be applied to nearly every app in the SaaS stack. In this article, we'll explore some universal configurations, explain why they are important, and guide you in setting them in a way that improves your SaaS apps' security posture.  Start with Admins Role-based access control (RBAC) is a key to NIST adherence and should be applied to every SaaS a
Cybersecurity Resources