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New Terrapin Flaw Could Let Attackers Downgrade SSH Protocol Security

New Terrapin Flaw Could Let Attackers Downgrade SSH Protocol Security

Jan 01, 2024 Encryption / Network Security
Security researchers from Ruhr University Bochum have discovered a vulnerability in the Secure Shell ( SSH ) cryptographic network protocol that could allow an attacker to downgrade the connection's security by breaking the integrity of the secure channel. Called  Terrapin  ( CVE-2023-48795 , CVSS score: 5.9), the exploit has been described as the "first ever practically exploitable prefix truncation attack." "By carefully adjusting the sequence numbers during the handshake, an attacker can remove an arbitrary amount of messages sent by the client or server at the beginning of the secure channel without the client or server noticing it," researchers Fabian Bäumer, Marcus Brinkmann, and Jörg Schwenk  said . SSH is a  method  for securely sending commands to a computer over an unsecured network. It relies on cryptography to authenticate and encrypt connections between devices. This is accomplished by means of a handshake in which a client and server agree up
Warning: Poorly Secured Linux SSH Servers Under Attack for Cryptocurrency Mining

Warning: Poorly Secured Linux SSH Servers Under Attack for Cryptocurrency Mining

Dec 27, 2023 Malware / Server Security
Poorly secured Linux SSH servers are being targeted by bad actors to install port scanners and dictionary attack tools with the goal of targeting other vulnerable servers and co-opting them into a network to carry out cryptocurrency mining and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks. "Threat actors can also choose to install only scanners and sell the breached IP and account credentials on the dark web," the AhnLab Security Emergency Response Center (ASEC)  said  in a report on Tuesday. In these attacks, adversaries try to guess a server's SSH credentials by running through a list of commonly used combinations of usernames and passwords, a technique called dictionary attack. Should the brute-force attempt be successful, it's followed by the threat actor deploying other malware, including scanners, to scan for other susceptible systems on the internet. Specifically, the scanner is designed to look for systems where port 22 -- which is associated with the SSH
SaaS Compliance through the NIST Cybersecurity Framework

SaaS Compliance through the NIST Cybersecurity Framework

Feb 20, 2024Cybersecurity Framework / SaaS Security
The US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) cybersecurity framework is one of the world's most important guidelines for securing networks. It can be applied to any number of applications, including SaaS.  One of the challenges facing those tasked with securing SaaS applications is the different settings found in each application. It makes it difficult to develop a configuration policy that will apply to an HR app that manages employees, a marketing app that manages content, and an R&D app that manages software versions, all while aligning with NIST compliance standards.  However, there are several settings that can be applied to nearly every app in the SaaS stack. In this article, we'll explore some universal configurations, explain why they are important, and guide you in setting them in a way that improves your SaaS apps' security posture.  Start with Admins Role-based access control (RBAC) is a key to NIST adherence and should be applied to every SaaS a
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