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The Hacker News - Cybersecurity News and Analysis: EMOTET Malware

Japan, France, New Zealand Warn of Sudden Uptick in Emotet Trojan Attacks

Japan, France, New Zealand Warn of Sudden Uptick in Emotet Trojan Attacks

September 08, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
Cybersecurity agencies across Asia and Europe have issued multiple security alerts regarding the resurgence of email-based Emotet malware attacks targeting businesses in France, Japan, and New Zealand. "The emails contain malicious attachments or links that the receiver is encouraged to download," New Zealand's Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) said. "These links and attachments may look like genuine invoices, financial documents, shipping information, resumes, scanned documents, or information on COVID-19, but they are fake." Echoing similar concerns, Japan's CERT (JPCERT/CC) cautioned it found a rapid increase in the number of domestic domain (.jp) email addresses that have been infected with the malware and can be misused to send spam emails in an attempt to spread the infection further. First identified in 2014 and distributed by a threat group tracked as TA542 (or Mummy Spider), Emotet has since evolved from its original roots as a s
Researchers Exploited A Bug in Emotet to Stop the Spread of Malware

Researchers Exploited A Bug in Emotet to Stop the Spread of Malware

August 17, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
Emotet, a notorious email-based malware behind several botnet-driven spam campaigns and ransomware attacks, contained a flaw that allowed cybersecurity researchers to activate a kill-switch and prevent the malware from infecting systems for six months. "Most of the vulnerabilities and exploits that you read about are good news for attackers and bad news for the rest of us," Binary Defense's James Quinn said. "However, it's important to keep in mind that malware is software that can also have flaws. Just as attackers can exploit flaws in legitimate software to cause harm, defenders can also reverse-engineer malware to discover its vulnerabilities and then exploit those to defeat the malware." The kill-switch was alive between February 6, 2020, to August 6, 2020, for 182 days, before the malware authors patched their malware and closed the vulnerability. Since its first identification in 2014, Emotet has evolved from its initial roots as a banking
Emotet Malware Now Hacks Nearby Wi-Fi Networks to Infect New Victims

Emotet Malware Now Hacks Nearby Wi-Fi Networks to Infect New Victims

February 12, 2020Ravie Lakshmanan
Emotet, the notorious trojan behind a number of botnet-driven spam campaigns and ransomware attacks, has found a new attack vector: using already infected devices to identify new victims that are connected to nearby Wi-Fi networks. According to researchers at Binary Defense , the newly discovered Emotet sample leverages a "Wi-Fi spreader" module to scan Wi-Fi networks, and then attempts to infect devices that are connected to them. The cybersecurity firm said the Wi-Fi spreader has a timestamp of April 16, 2018, indicating the spreading behavior has been running "unnoticed" for close to two years until it was detected for the first time last month. The development marks an escalation of Emotet's capabilities, as networks in close physical proximity to the original victim are now susceptible to infection. How Does Emotet's Wi-Fi Spreader Module Work? The updated version of the malware works by leveraging an already compromised host to list all
New Banking Malware with Network Sniffer Spreading Rapidly Worldwide

New Banking Malware with Network Sniffer Spreading Rapidly Worldwide

June 28, 2014Swati Khandelwal
The hike in the banking malware this year is no doubt almost double compared to the previous one, and so in the techniques of malware authors. Until now, we have seen banking Trojans affecting devices and steal users' financial credentials in order to run them out of their money. But nowadays, malware authors are adopting more sophisticated techniques in an effort to target as many victims as possible. BANKING MALWARE WITH NETWORK SNIFFING Security researchers from the Anti-virus firm Trend Micro have discovered a new variant of banking malware that not only steals users' information from the device it has infected but, has ability to " sniff " network activity in an effort to compromise the devices of same network users as well. The banking malware, dubbed as EMOTET spreads rapidly through spammed emails that masquerade itself as a bank transfers and shipping invoices. The spammed email comes along with an attached link that users easily click, considering that t
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