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BlueKeep Vulnerability | Breaking Cybersecurity News | The Hacker News

First Cyber Attack 'Mass Exploiting' BlueKeep RDP Flaw Spotted in the Wild

First Cyber Attack 'Mass Exploiting' BlueKeep RDP Flaw Spotted in the Wild

Nov 03, 2019
Cybersecurity researchers have spotted a new cyberattack that is believed to be the very first but an amateur attempt to weaponize the infamous BlueKeep RDP vulnerability in the wild to mass compromise vulnerable systems for cryptocurrency mining. In May this year, Microsoft released a patch for a highly-critical remote code execution flaw, dubbed  BlueKeep , in its Windows Remote Desktop Services that could be exploited remotely to take full control over vulnerable systems just by sending specially crafted requests over RDP. BlueKeep, tracked as CVE-2019-0708 , is a wormable vulnerability because it can be weaponized by potential malware to propagate itself from one vulnerable computer to another automatically without requiring victims' interaction. BlueKeep has been considered to be such a serious threat that since its discovery, Microsoft and even government agencies [ NSA and GCHQ ] had continuously been encouraging Windows users and admins to apply security patches bef
Linux Botnet Adding BlueKeep-Flawed Windows RDP Servers to Its Target List

Linux Botnet Adding BlueKeep-Flawed Windows RDP Servers to Its Target List

Jul 25, 2019
Cybersecurity researchers have discovered a new variant of WatchBog , a Linux-based cryptocurrency mining malware botnet, which now also includes a module to scan the Internet for Windows RDP servers vulnerable to the Bluekeep flaw . BlueKeep is a highly-critical, wormable, remote code execution vulnerability in the Windows Remote Desktop Services that could allow an unauthenticated remote attacker to take full control over vulnerable systems just by sending specially crafted requests over RDP protocol. Though the patches for the BlueKeep vulnerability (CVE–2019-0708) was already released by Microsoft in May this year, more than 800,000 Windows machines accessible over the Internet are still vulnerable to the critical flaw. Fortunately, even after many individuals in the security community developed working remote code exploits for BlueKeep, there is no public proof-of-concept (PoC) exploit available till the date, potentially preventing opportunistic hackers from wreaking h
Nearly 1 Million Computers Still Vulnerable to "Wormable" BlueKeep RDP Flaw

Nearly 1 Million Computers Still Vulnerable to "Wormable" BlueKeep RDP Flaw

May 28, 2019
Nearly 1 million Windows systems are still unpatched and have been found vulnerable to a recently disclosed critical, wormable, remote code execution vulnerability in the Windows Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP)—two weeks after Microsoft releases the security patch. If exploited, the vulnerability could allow an attacker to easily cause havoc around the world, potentially much worse than what WannaCry and NotPetya like wormable attacks did in 2017. Dubbed BlueKeep and tracked as CVE-2019-0708, the vulnerability affects Windows 2003, XP, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2 editions and could spread automatically on unprotected systems. The vulnerability could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to execute arbitrary code and take control of a targeted computer just by sending specially crafted requests to the device's Remote Desktop Service (RDS) via the RDP—without requiring any interaction from a user. Describing the BlueKeep vulnerability as being Wormable
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Guide: Secure Your Privileged Access with Our Expert-Approved Template

websiteDelineaIT Security / Access Control Security
Transform your Privileged Access Management with our Policy Template—over 40 expertly crafted statements to elevate compliance and streamline your security.
A SaaS Security Challenge: Getting Permissions All in One Place

A SaaS Security Challenge: Getting Permissions All in One Place 

May 08, 2024Attack Surface / SaaS Security
Permissions in SaaS platforms like Salesforce, Workday, and Microsoft 365 are remarkably precise. They spell out exactly which users have access to which data sets. The terminology differs between apps, but each user's base permission is determined by their role, while additional permissions may be granted based on tasks or projects they are involved with. Layered on top of that are custom permissions required by an individual user.  For example, look at a sales rep who is involved in a tiger team investigating churn while also training two new employees. The sales rep's role would grant her one set of permissions to access prospect data, while the tiger team project would grant access to existing customer data. Meanwhile, special permissions are set up, providing the sales rep with visibility into the accounts of the two new employees. While these permissions are precise, however, they are also very complex. Application admins don't have a single screen within these applications th
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